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id title slug biography
2Wally Lambwally-lamb<p>Wally Lamb's books are neither short nor simple; but like a James Patterson of emotions, he pulls readers in and doesn't let go. His affecting novels are marvels of imagination and empathy.</p>
3Joyce Carol Oatesjoyce-carol-oates<p>In a prolific and varied oeuvre that ranges over essays, plays, criticism, and several genres of fiction, Joyce Carol Oates has proved herself one of the most influential and important storytellers in the literary world.</p>
4Bill McKibbenbill-mckibben<p><B>Bill McKibben</B> is the author of ten books, including <I>The End of Nature</I>, <I>The Age of Missing Information</I>, and <I>Enough&#58; Staying Human in an Engineered Age</I>. A former staff writer for <I>The New Yorker</I>, he writes regularly for <I>Harper&#8217;s</I>, <I>The Atlantic Monthly</I>, and <I>The New York Review of Books</I>, among other publications. He is a scholar in residence at Middlebury College and lives in Vermont with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern, and their daughter.</p>
5Harold Bloomharold-bloom<p>One of our most popular, respected, and controversial literary critics, Yale University professor Harold Bloom s books about, variously, Shakespeare, the Bible, and the classic literature are as erudite as they are accessible.</p>
6Nikki Giovanninikki-giovanni<p><P> Poet, activist, mother, and professor, Nikki Giovanni is a three-time NAACP Image Award winner and the first recipient of the Rosa Parks Woman of Courage Award, and holds the Langston Hughes Medal for Outstanding Poetry. The author of twenty-seven books and a Grammy nominee for <i>The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection</i>, she is the University Distinguished Professor/English at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, and an Oprah Living Legend.<P></i></p>
7Paul Austerpaul-auster<p>Paul Auster's unique novels are often like Chinese boxes, continually opening further to reveal new layers. He approaches his writing as he has approached his life, to an extent: as something of a nomad in a perpetually changing, mysterious landscape.</p>
8Peter Straubpeter-straub<p><P>PETER STRAUB is the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of more than a dozen novels. Two of his most recent, <i>Lost Boy Lost Girl</i> and <i>In the Night Room,</i> are winners of the Bram Stoker Award. He lives in New York City.</p>
9Phillip Lopatephillip-lopate<p>Philip Lopate is the author of <i>Against Joie de Vivre</i>, <i>Bachelorhood</i>, <i>The Rug Merchant</i>, <i>Being with Children</i>, and <i>Confessions of Summer</i>. A recipient of Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, his works have appeared in <i>Best American Essays</i>, <i>The Paris Review</i>, Pushcart Prize annuals, and many other publications. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, and is Adams Professor of English at Hofstra University.</p>
10Ann Chartersann-charters<p>Scholar, editor, and biographer of Beat generation writer Jack Kerouac -- she even penned the preface to his groundbreaking <I>On the Road</I> -- Ann Charters captures the passion and promise of one of the most culturally influential decades of the century.</p>
11Walter Mosleywalter-mosley<p>A genre-bending author who can move from science-fiction to mysteries, Walter Mosley is perhaps best-known -- and loved -- for his 1940s and 50s noir crime novels starring the cool, complex detective Easy Rawlins.</p>
12David Remnickdavid-remnick<p><P>David Remnick has been the editor of <i>The New Yorker</i> since 1998. A staff writer for the magazine from 1992 to 1998, he was previously <i>The Washington Post's</i> correspondent in the Soviet Union. The author of several books, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the George Polk Award for his 1994 book <i>Lenin's Tomb</i>. He lives in New York with his wife and children.</p>
13Sapphiresapphire<p><P>Sapphire is the author of <b>American Dreams</b>, a collection of poetry which was cited by <i>Publishers Weekly</i> as, "One of the strongest debut collections of the nineties." <b>Push</b>, her novel, won the Book-of-the-Month Club Stephen Crane award for First Fiction, the Black Caucus of the American Library Association's First Novelist Award, and, in Great Britain, the Mind Book of the Year Award. <b>Push</b> was named by the <i>Village Voice</i> and <i>Time Out New York</i> as one of the top ten books of 1996. <b>Push</b> was nominated for an NAACP Image Award in the category of Outstanding Literary Work of Fiction. About her most recent book of poetry <i>Poet's and Writer's Magazine</i> wrote, "With her soul on the line in each verse, her latest collection, <b>Black Wings & Blind Angels</b>, retains Sapphire's incendiary power to win hearts and singe minds."<br>&#160;<br>Sapphire's work has appeared in <i>The New Yorker</i>, <i>The New York Times Magazine</i>, <i>The New York Times Book Review</i>, <i>The Black Scholar</i>, <i>Spin</i>, and <i>Bomb</i>. In February of 2007 Arizona State University presented <i>PUSHing Boundaries, PUSHing Art&#58; A Symposium on the Works of Sapphire</i>. Sapphire's work has been translated into eleven languages and has been adapted for stage in the United States and Europe. <i>Precious</i>, the film adaption of her novel, recently won the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Awards in the U.S. dramatic competition at Sundance (2009).</p>
14Lorrie Moorelorrie-moore<p><br>Lorrie Moore is the author of the story collections Like Life and Self-Help, and the novels Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? and Anagrams. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories&#58; The O. Henry Awards. She is a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. <br></p>
15Cristina Garciacristina-garcia<p><P>Cristina Garc&#237;a was born in Havana and grew up in New York City. Her first novel, <b>Dreaming in Cuban,</b> was nominated for a National Book Award and has been widely translated. Ms. Garc&#237;a has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Hodder Fellow at Princeton University, and the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award. She lives in Los Angeles with her daughter, Pilar.</p>
16Ilan Stavansilan-stavans<p>Ilan Stavans, editor, is the Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College. His books include <I>The Hispanic Condition</I> and <I>On Borrowed Words&#58; A Memoir of Language.</I> He edited <I>Isaac Bashevis Singer&#58; Collected Stories</I>, volumes #149, #150, and #151 of The Library of America.</p>
17Michael Chabonmichael-chabon<p>Although his novels and short stories have varied in setting -- from the 1940s New York of the Pulitzer Prize-winning <I>The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay</I> to the contemporary Pittsburgh of <I>The Mysteries of Pittsburgh</I> -- all of Michael Chabon s witty and understated books feature memorable, deftly-drawn characters trying to find their place in the world.</p>
18Edwidge Danticatedwidge-danticatEdwidge Danticat was nominated for the National Book Award in 1995 for her story collection, <i>Krik? Krak!</i> Her first novel, <i>Breath, Eyes, Memory</i>, was published to acclaim when she was twenty-five.
19Adam Gopnikadam-gopnik<p><P>ROBERT ATWAN has been the series editor of <i>The Best American Essays</i> since its inception in 1986. He has edited numerous literary anthologies and written essays and reviews for periodicals nationwide.</p>
20Honor Moorehonor-moore<p>Honor Moore is a poet and the author of The Bishop's Daughter. She lives in New York City and teaches at the New School and Columbia University.<br /></p>
21Madeleine L'Englemadeleine-l-engle<p>Best known as the writer of YA classics like <i>A Wrinkle in Time</i>, the prolific and eclectic Madeleine L'Engle penned adult fiction, poems, plays, memoirs, and religious meditations -- all infused with her trademark eloquence, imagination, and intellectual curiosity.</p>
22Larry McMurtrylarry-mcmurtry<p>Larry McMurtry worked as a cowhand on his father's Texas cattle ranch until he was 22, but never aspired to be a rancher. Instead, he published his first novel, <i>Horseman, Pass By</i>, when he was just 25. More than two dozen novels later, there's still more to McMurtry than a typical western.</p>
23Stewart O'Nanstewart-o-nan<p>In 1996, the literary magazine <i>Granta</I> named Stewart O'Nan one of America's best young novelists -- an honor he has continued to justify in an impressive body of complex and stylistically diverse fiction.</p>
24Barbara Kingsolverbarbara-kingsolver<p>Equally at home with poetry, novels, and nonfiction narratives, Barbara Kingsolver credits her careers in scientific writing and journalism with instilling in her a love of nature, a writer's discipline, and a strong sense of social justice.</p>
25Caroline Kennedycaroline-kennedy<strong>Caroline Kennedy</strong> is the editor of the <i class="null1">New York Times</i> bestselling <em>A Patriot's Handbook, Profiles in Courage for Our Time, The Best-Loved Poems of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, A Family of Poems,</em> <em>A Family Christmas</em>, and the coauthor of <em>The Right to Privacy</em> and <em>In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action</em>. She serves as the Vice Chair of the Fund for Public Schools in New York City and President of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. She lives in New York City.
26Richard Wrightrichard-wright<p>A trailblazing African-American novelist, playwright, and memoirist, Richard A. Wright brought the experiences of the twentieth-century ghetto into the realm of high art with his blockbuster 1940 novel <i>Native Son</i>. He went on to mix autobiography and fiction, and to become one of the most celebrated writers -- black or white -- of his era.</p>
27Carmela Ciurarucarmela-ciuraru<p><P>Carmela Ciuraru is the editor of the anthology <i>First Loves&#58; Poets Introduce the Essential Poems That Captivated and Inspired Them,</i> and the former editor of the<i> Journal of the Poetry Society of America</i>. A graduate of Columbia University's School of Journalism, she lives in New York City.</p>
28Tony Hillermantony-hillerman<p>Tony Hillerman's experience as a journalist and a lover of Native American culture lent an unmistakable authenticity to his mysteries. In addition to his popular series starring Navajo Tribal Police detectives Chee and Leaphorn, he wrote standalone novels, essays about the Southwest, and a warmly reviewed autobiography (<i>Seldom Disappointed</i>) that revealed not only his talent, but his bravery as a soldier in World War II. He died in 2008 at the age of 83.</p>
29Sue Millersue-miller<p>Sue Miller is an expert in limning the pain of endings, but if this were the extent of her talents, she probably would not be as successful as she is. In Miller's books, one broken relationship often leads to the development of another. Her stories may not offer pat answers and perfect love stories, but readers find something more rewarding in the end.</p>
30Jay Atkinsonjay-atkinson<p><P>Jay Atkinson is the author of two novels, three narrative nonfiction books, and a collection of stories. His work has appeared in the <i>New York Times, Men's Health,</i> the Boston Globe, and elsewhere. He teaches journalism at Boston University.</p>
31E. Lynn Harrise-lynn-harris<p>How to categorize E. Lynn Harris? An African-American novelist? A gay novelist? A literary romance writer? Nothing quite fits, but to Harris s fans, his bestselling novels belong in a genre of their own: one in which the characters are as difficult and complex as their problems, and the solutions as bittersweet and resonant as they often are in life.</p>
32Laura Furmanlaura-furman<p>Laura Furman's work has appeared in <i>The New Yorker</i>, <i>Vanity Fair</i>, <i>Ploughshares</i>, <i>The Yale Review</i>, and other magazines. She is the founding editor of the highly regarded <i>American Short Fiction</i> (three-time finalist for the American Magazine Award). A professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin, she teaches in the graduate James A. Michener Center for writers. She lives in Austin.</p>
33Barbara Smithbarbara-smith<p><P>Barbara Smith is the host of a syndicated television series and appears regularly on NBC's <I>Today</I> show. She owns three B. Smith's restaurants in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Sag Harbor, New York, and is the editor in chief of the newly launched magazine <I>B. Smith Style</I>. She lives in New York City and Sag Harbor.</p>
34Mark Twainmark-twain<p>Riverboat pilot, journalist, failed businessman (several times over): Samuel Clemens -- the man behind the figure of Mark Twain -- led many lives. But it was in his novels and short stories that he created a voice and an outlook on life that will be forever identified with the American character.</p>
35Susan Wittig Albertsusan-wittig-albert<p>One of the book world's most respected authorities on herbs and their uses, Susan Wittig Albert is beloved by fans the world over for her mystery series starring herb-growing sleuth China Bayles -- as well as the Victorian Mysteries series she coauthors with husband Bill, under the pen name Robin Paige.</p>
36Billy Collinsbilly-collins<p>Enjoying a popularity unheard of for most poets, Billy Collins has had a remarkable late-life surge, aided by NPR exposure and his 2001 and 2002 appointments as the U.S. poet laureate. His style is engaging, conversational, funny, and surprising.</p>
37Thomas Wolfethomas-wolfe<p>A larger than life figure -- like his contemporary, Ernest Hemingway -- Thomas Wolfe embodied a particularly American vision of the restless and eager writer, taking in the totality of his life experience and turning it into a gigantic, unwieldy vision in prose. With the publication of his semiautobiographical <i>Look Homeward, Angel</i> in 1929, Wolfe announced his dramatic entrance on the stage of modern fiction; but an early death made his exit sadly premature.</p>
38Diane Fanningdiane-fanning<p><B>DIANE FANNING</B> is the author of <I>Written in Blood&#58;</I> <I>A True Story of Murder and a Deadly 16 Year-Old Secret that Tore a Family Apart</I>, <I>Through the Window&#58; The Terrifying True Story of Cross Country Killer Tommy Lynn Sells,</I> <I>Into the Water</I>&#58; <I>An Astonishing True Story of Abduction, Murder, and the Nice Guy Next Door,</I> and the co-editor of <I>Red Boots &amp; Attitude</I>. Fanning lives in New Braunfels, Texas.<BR><BR>Vist her Web site at&#58; www.dianefanning.com</p>
39Salman Rushdiesalman-rushdie<p>One of the most celebrated writers of our time, SALMAN RUSHDIE is the author of ten previous novels&#151; <i>Grimus, Midnight's Children</i> (for which he won the Booker Prize in 1981, the Booker of Bookers in 1993, and, in 2008, the Best of the Booker), <i>Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, Shalimar the Clown</i>, and <i>The Enchantress of Florence</i>. He has also published four works of non-fiction, a collection of short stories, and edited two fiction anthologies. In June 2007, Rushdie was appointed a Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II for services to literature. He holds the rank Commandeur in the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France and began a five-year term as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emory University in 2007. In May 2008, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and also in 2008, the London Times ranked Rushdie thirteenth on their list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". For two years he served as president of The PEN American Center, the world's oldest human rights organization, and is the chair of PEN's World Voices Festival of International Literature, an annual literary festival he began in New York in 2001. Rushdie is currently working on the film version of <i>Midnight's Children</i>.</p>
40Oscar Wildeoscar-wilde<p>The ever-quotable Oscar Wilde once said, "Anybody can make history. Only a great man can write it." From his outsize celebrity in Victorian London to his authorship of fiction, drama, and poetry that uniquely captured his era, it's fair to say that Wilde succeeded on both counts.</p>
41J. R. R. Tolkienj-r-r-tolkien<p>It seems an unlikely formula for success: an Oxford professor of Anglo-Saxon, and a book that begins with a little man who lives in a hole in the ground. But <I>The Hobbit</I>, followed by <I>The Lord of the Rings</I>, created the modern genre of heroic fantasy and made J.R.R. Tolkien one of the most widely-read authors in the world.</p>
42Maeve Binchymaeve-binchy<p>As an author, Binchy's goal is simple: to let the story shine through. She told Oprah Winfrey, "I do not have a particular literary style, I am not experimental ... I tell a story and I want to share it with my readers." As a result, with her Ireland-set stories featuring strong heroines, friendship and romance, Binchy has gained quite a following since she became a bestselling author at age 43.</p>
43Virginia Woolfvirginia-woolf<p>The early decades of the 20th century saw the rise of the experimental novel, and few writers had more success with their experiments than Virginia Woolf. Her innovative approach as a novelist, critic, and biographer made her an author who is even more widely read today than she was in her own time.</p>
44John Careyjohn-carey<p><P><b>John Carey</b> is Merton Professor of English at Oxford University, a distinguished critic, reviewer and broadcaster, and the author of several books, including <i>The Intellectuals and the Masses</i>.</p>
45John Updikejohn-updike<p>Best known for a series of novels featuring Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, John Updike was one of the 20th century's most distinguished American authors. Over the course of his long, prolific career, he garnered numerous literary awards, including two coveted Pulitzer Prizes!</p>
46Christopher Hitchenschristopher-hitchens<p>Chistopher Hitchens is a widely published polemicist and frequent radio and TV commentator. He is a contributing editor to <EM>Vanity Fair</EM> and a visiting professor of liberal studies at the New School in New York.</p>
47Jack Canfieldjack-canfield<p>Motivational speaker Jack Canfield is the co-creator of the <I>Chicken Soup for the Soul</I> series. With over 65 books to his credit, Canfield has taken the inspirational advice he delivered in his speeches and forged one of the most popular book series in print.</p>
48Otto Penzlerotto-penzler<p><P>Otto Penzler is the proprietor of The Mysterious Bookshop in New York City. He was publisher of <i>The Armchair Detective</i>, the founder of the Mysterious Press and the Armchair Detective Library, and created the publishing firm Otto Penzler Books. He is a recipient of an Edgar Award for <i>The Encyclopedia of Mystery</i> <i>and Detection</i> and the Ellery Queen Award by the Mystery Writers of America for his many contributions to the field. He is the editor of <i>The Vampire Archives</i> and <i>The Black Lizard Big Book of Pulps</i>, which was a <i>New York Times</i> bestseller.</p>
49Marlo Thomasmarlo-thomas<p><P>Marlo Thomas graduated from the University of Southern California with a teaching degree. She is the author of five bestselling books, "Free to Be ...You and Me, Free to Be...a Family, The Right Words at the Right Time, Thanks and Giving&#58; All Year Long, " and "The Right Words at the Right Time Volume 2&#58; Your Turn!" Ms. Thomas has won four Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe, a Grammy, the Peabody Award, and has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame for her work in television, including her starring role in the landmark series "That Girl, " which she also conceived and produced.</p>
50Cathi Hanauercathi-hanauer<p><P>Cathi Hanauer, the author of the novel My Sister's Bones, has written articles, essays, reviews, and fiction for <i>Elle, Mirabella, Self, Glamour, Mademoiselle,</i> and many other magazines. She has been the monthly books columnist for both <i>Glamour</i> and <i>Mademoiselle,</i> and was the relationship-advice columnist for <i>Seventeen</i> for seven years. She lives in western Massachusetts with her husband, writer Daniel Jones, and their daughter and son.</p>
51Victor Hugovictor-hugo<p>"If a writer wrote merely for his time, I would have to break my pen and throw it away," the larger-than-life Victor Hugo once confessed. Indeed, this 19th-century French master's works -- from the epic drama <I>Les Misérables</I> to the classic unrequited love story <I>The Hunchback of Notre Dame</i> -- have spanned the ages, their themes of morality and redemption ever applicable to our times.</p>
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id title author author_id author_bio authors title_slug author_slug isbn13 isbn10 price format publisher pubdate edition subjects lexile pages dimensions overview excerpt synopsis toc editorial_reviews
1Opening Spaces: An Anthology of Contemporary African Women's WritingYvonne Vera0<p><P>EDITOR<p>Yvonne Vera was born and raised in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, gained her Ph.D. from York University in Canada, and was the Director of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo. Yvonne Vera died at age 40 in 2005<p>Yvonne Vera&rsquo;s Without a Name and Under the Tongue both won first prize in the Zimbabwe Publishers Literary Awards of 1995 and 1997 respectively. Under the Tongue won the 1997 Commonwealth Writers Prize (Africa Region). Yvonne Vera won the Swedish literary award The Voice of Africa 1999.</p>Yvonne Vera (Editor), Yvonne Veraopening-spacesyvonne-vera97804359101050435910108$14.52PaperbackHeinemannSeptember 19991st EditionGeneral & Miscellaneous Literature Anthologies, Anthologies1865.07 (w) x 7.78 (h) x 0.42 (d)In this anthology the award-winning author Yvonne Vera brings together the stories of many talented writers from different parts of Africa.<p><p>African women are seldom given the space to express their concerns, their ideas and their reflections about the societies in which they live. In situations where a good woman is expected to remain silent, literature can provide an important medium for the expression of deeply-felt and sometimes shocking views. In this anthology the award-winning author Yvonne Vera brings together the stories of many talented writers from different parts of Africa. The act as witnesses to the dramas of private and public life. Their stories challenge contemporary attitudes and behaviour, leaving no room for complacency.<p></p><P>Preface<p>The Girl Who Can - Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana)<p>Deciduous Gazettes - Melissa Tandiwe Myambo (Zimbabwe)<p>The Enigma - Lindsey Collen (Mauritius)<p>The Red Velvet Dress - Farida Karodia (South Africa)<p>Uncle Bunty - Norma Kitson (South Africa)<p>The Betrayal - Veronique Tadjo (Cote D&#39;Ivoire)<p>The Museum - Leila Aboulela (Sudan)<p>The Power of a Plate of Rice - Ifeoma Okoye (Nigeria)<p>Stress - Lilia Momple (Mozambique)<p>A State of Outrage - Sindiwe Magona (South Africa)<p>Crocodile Tails - Chiedze Musengezi (Zimbabwe)<p>Night Thoughts - Monde Sifuniso (Zambia)<p>The Barrel of a Pen - Gugu Ndlovu (Zimbabwe)<p>A Perfect Wife - Anna Doa (Mali)<p>The Home-Coming - Milly Jafta (Namibia)<p>Notes on Contributors Acknowledgements
2The Caine Prize for African Writing 2010: 11th Annual CollectionThe Caine Prize for African Writing0The Caine Prize for African Writingthe-caine-prize-for-african-writing-2010the-caine-prize-for-african-writing97819065233741906523371$13.46PaperbackNew InternationalistAugust 2010Short Story Anthologies, African Fiction, African Literature Anthologies2085.00 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.70 (d)<p>The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa's leading literary prize. For the past ten years it has supported and promoted contemporary African writing. Previous winners and entrants include Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, EC Osondu, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Henrietta Rose-Innes, Mary Watson, and Binyavanga Wainaina.</p> <p>The 2010 collection will include the shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers' Workshop. It will be published in time for the announcement of the award in July 2010.</p><p><p>The best in new short story fiction from Africa's leading literary award.<p></p><P>Introduction 6<P>Caine Prize 2010 Shortlisted Stories<P>The Life of Worm Ken Barris (South Africa) 9<P>How Shall We Kill the Bishop? Lily Mabura (Kenya) 20<P>Muzungu Namwali Serpell (Zambia) 31<P>Soulmates Alex Smith (South Africa) 48<P>Stickfighting Days Olufemi Terry (Sierra Leone) 59<P>The CDC Caine Prize African Writers' Workshop Stories 2010<P>The Plantation Ovo Adagha (Nigeria) 76<P>Soul Safari Alnoor Amlani (Kenya) 86<P>A Life in Full Jude Dibia (Nigeria) 96<P>Mr Oliver Mamle Kabu (Ghana) 108<P>Happy Ending Stanley Onjezani Kenani (Malawi) 122<P>The David Thuo Show Samuel Munene (Kenya) 137<P>Set Me Free Clifford Chianga Oluoch (Kenya) 147<P>Invocations to the Dead Gill Schierhout (South Africa) 163<P>Almost Cured of Sadness Vuyo Seripe (South Africa) 176<P>The Journey Valerie Tagwira (Zimbabwe) 187<P>The King and I Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (Zimbabwe) 200<P>Indigo Molara Wood (Nigeria) 212<P>Rules 224
3African FolktalesRoger D. Abrahams0Roger D. Abrahams, Dan Frankafrican-folktalesroger-d-abrahams97803947211700394721179$18.95PaperbackKnopf Doubleday Publishing GroupAugust 1983Travel, Africa<p><P>Nearly 100 stories from over 40 tribe-related myths of creation, tales of epic deeds, ghost stories and tales set in both the animal and human realms.</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>This volume sports a hefty 95 stories gleaned from the notes of the earliest missionaries on up to recent anthropological studies. Abrahams admits that reading the stories lacks the full impact of hearing them told aloud but contends that they can nonetheless still be enjoyed. The stories feature numerous illustrations. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.</p>
4Unchained Voices: An Anthology of Black Authors in the English-Speaking World of the Eighteenth CenturyVincent Carretta0Vincent Carrettaunchained-voicesvincent-carretta97808131907610813190762$30.00PaperbackUniversity Press of KentuckyDecember 2003ExpandedUnited States History - African American History, African American History, African Diaspora History, American Literature Anthologies, Anthologies, Ethnic & Minority Studies, United States History - 18th Century - General & Miscellaneous, Africana - Afric4166.10 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)Vincent Carretta has assembled the most comprehensive anthology ever published of writings by eighteenth-century people of African descent, capturing the surprisingly diverse experiences of blacks on both sides of the Atlantic--America, Britain, the West Indies, and Africa--between 1760 and 1798.<p><P>Vincent Carretta has assembled the most comprehensive anthology ever published of writings by eighteenth-century people of African descent, capturing the surprisingly diverse experiences of blacks on both sides of the Atlantic&#151;America, Britain, the West Indies, and Africa&#151;between 1760 and 1798.</p><h3>African American Review</h3><p>This excellent anthology meets a longstanding need for a scholarly collection of early Anglo African and African American writers.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Note on the Texts and Editorial Policy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">17</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Note on Money</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">18</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Notes on the Illustrations</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Narrative of the Uncommon Sufferings, and Surprizing Deliverance of Briton Hammon, A Negro Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">20</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Poems: An Evening Thought</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">26</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Address to Miss Phillis Wheatly, Ethiopian Poetess</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">26</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Narrative of the Most Remarkable Particulars in the Life of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, An African Prince, As related by Himself</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">32</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Poems: An Elegiac Poem, on the Death of ... George Whitefield</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"To His Excellency General Washington"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"An Ode"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">72</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, an African, in Two Volumes. To Which are Prefixed, Memoirs of his Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">77</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Narrative of the Lord's wonderful Dealings with John Marrant, a Black</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">110</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Life and Confession of Johnson Green, Who Is to Be Executed this day, August 17th, 1786, for the Atrocious Crime of Burglary; Together with his Last and Dying Words</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">134</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Petition of an African Slave, to the Legislature of Massachusetts" (1782), from The American Museum, or Repository of Ancient and Modern Fugitive Pieces, Prose and Poetical. For June 1787</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">142</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil and Wicked Traffic of The Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Humbly Submitted to the Inhabitants of Great-Britain, By Ottobah Cugoano, a Native of Africa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">145</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">185</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Copy of a Letter from Benjamin Banneker to the Secretary of State with his Answer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">319</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"An Account of several Baptist Churches, consisting chiefly of Negro Slaves: particularly of one of Kingston, in Jamaica; and another at Savannah in Georgia"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">325</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"An Account of the Life of Mr. David George, from Sierra Leone in Africa; given by himself in a Conversation with Brother Rippon of London, and Brother Pearce of Birmingham"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">333</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Memoirs of the Life of Boston King, a Black Preacher. Written by Himself, during his Residence at Kingswood-School"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">351</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa: But resident above sixty years in the United States of America. Related By Himself</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">369</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">App: Biographical Sketches</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">389</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>African American Review</h4>This excellent anthology meets a longstanding need for a scholarly collection of early Anglo African and African American writers. </article> <article> <h4>From the Publisher</h4><p>"An important work for gaining an understanding of a heretofore little examined aspect of the eighteenth century." -- Bloomsbury Review</p> <p>"The selection of texts is diverse and wide-ranging.... The most comprehensive anthology on the subject and deserves to become the standard text for students in eighteenth-century studies and American studies." -- British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies</p> <p>"Establishes the canon of Black diasporic authors writing in English in the 18th century and makes the texts accessible to scholars and students." -- East-Central Intelligencer</p> <p>"Carretta has done eighteenth-century studies an immeasurable service.... The definitive anthology of black writing of the eighteenth-century African diaspora, serving the purpose of both introduction to and contestation of the overlapping fields of American, British, religious, and African studies." -- Eighteenth-Century Fiction</p> <p>"Most challenging and exhaustive, both in quality and quantity of research, presentation, scope, and premise. Carretta seeks to validate what for him is an unbroken link of unshackled black literary voices." -- Eighteenth-Century Studies</p> <p>"This is the most comprehensive collection of writings by people of African descent on both sides of the Atlantic more than 200 years ago." -- Lexington Herald-Leader</p> <p>"An excellent anthology." -- Times Literary Supplement</p> <p>"Cause for celebration.... Will no doubt contribute to the ongoing rethinking of the eighteenth-century canon." -- Year's Work in English Studies</p> </article>
5Women Writing Africa: West Africa and the SahelEsi Sutherland-Addy0<p><P>Esi Sutherland-Addy (Ph.D. Hon, Hon FCP) is senior research fellow, head of the Language, Literature, and Drama Section, Institute of African Studies, and associate director of the African Humanties Institue Program at the University of Ghana. Aminata Diaw teaches in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar, S&#233;n&#233;gal, where she is currently the public affairs director of the Centre for Cultural and Scientific Programs. She is also Secretary General of the S&#233;n&#233;galese Council of Women and Chair for the subcommittee on Humanities and Social Sciences of the National Commission of UNESCO.</p>Esi Sutherland-Addy (Editor), Abena P. A. Busia (Editor), Aminata Diawwomen-writing-africaesi-sutherland-addy97815586150071558615008$29.95PaperbackFeminist Press at CUNY, TheAugust 2005Literary Criticism - General & Miscellaneous, Oral Tradition & Storytelling, African Literature Anthologies5606.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.30 (d)<p>The acclaimed Women Writing Africa project “opens up worlds too often excluded from the history books” (<i>Booklist</i>) and is an “essential resource for scholars and general readers alike” (<i>Library Journal</i>). It reveals the cultural legacy of African women in their own words, in never-before- published texts that include communal songs and lullabies, letters and speeches, poetry and fiction.</p> <p>Representing 20 languages and 12 countries, volume 2 covers western Africa, where most African Americans find their roots. The collection presents an epic history of the region through the eyes of its women, from the age of African kings through colonialism and independence.</p> <p>Volume 1 of the series, <i>Women Writing Africa: The Southern Region</i>, is also available; volumes 3 and 4 will be published in 2006.</p><p><P>A major literary and scholarly work that transforms perceptions of West African women's history and culture.</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>This second of four volumes representing the literary expression of African women focuses on 12 West African nations, documenting the history of this expression since upward of six centuries before colonialism and 20th-century independence. Editors Sutherland-Addy (language, literature, & drama, Inst. for African Studies, Univ. of Ghana) and Diaw (philosophy, Univ. Cheikh Anta Kiop in Dakar, Senegal) have compiled 132 texts accompanied by head notes by eminent authors (e.g., Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, and Bernadette Dao Sanou) to explain their cultural and historical contexts. These texts showcase not just the written word-in the form of letters, diaries, historical documents-but the spoken word as well, in lullabies, songs, and other oral traditions. Some of these texts are full of celebration and some of powerful emotions; all evoke powerful imagery. Both the texts and the head notes are fascinating to read, and the reader is truly gripped by the passion and emotion of the writers. This anthology provides an epic tale of African history while highlighting African women's valuable contributions to their culture and bringing their voices to life for readers everywhere. Highly recommended.-Susan McClellan, Avalon P.L., Pittsburgh Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.</p><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>This second of four volumes representing the literary expression of African women focuses on 12 West African nations, documenting the history of this expression since upward of six centuries before colonialism and 20th-century independence. Editors Sutherland-Addy (language, literature, &amp; drama, Inst. for African Studies, Univ. of Ghana) and Diaw (philosophy, Univ. Cheikh Anta Kiop in Dakar, Senegal) have compiled 132 texts accompanied by head notes by eminent authors (e.g., Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, and Bernadette Dao Sanou) to explain their cultural and historical contexts. These texts showcase not just the written word-in the form of letters, diaries, historical documents-but the spoken word as well, in lullabies, songs, and other oral traditions. Some of these texts are full of celebration and some of powerful emotions; all evoke powerful imagery. Both the texts and the head notes are fascinating to read, and the reader is truly gripped by the passion and emotion of the writers. This anthology provides an epic tale of African history while highlighting African women's valuable contributions to their culture and bringing their voices to life for readers everywhere. Highly recommended.-Susan McClellan, Avalon P.L., Pittsburgh Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information. </article>
610 Years of the Caine Prize for African Writing: Plus Coetzee, Gordimer, Achebe, OkriThe Caine The Caine Prize for African Writing0The Caine The Caine Prize for African Writing10-years-of-the-caine-prize-for-african-writingthe-caine-the-caine-prize-for-african-writing9781906523244190652324X$18.95HardcoverNew InternationalistSeptember 2009Literary Collections<p><p>The 10 winning stories accompanied by stories from the former African Booker prizewinners.<p></p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>Starred Review. <P>As exhibited in this collection, the Caine Prize, founded in 1999 in honor of the late Sir Michael Caine's work to popularize African writing in English, has spotlighted some exceptional writing; each prize-winning short story included here (the Caine is also known as the African Booker; as such, African winners of the Booker prize also appear) examines and explodes stereotypes about Africa and its literature. Characters reveal dignity and doubt in extraordinary situations, including a grandmother who abandons her frail husband in order to carry her grandchildren to safety in Nadine Gordimer's powerful "The Ultimate Safari." J. M. Coetzee's "Nietverloren" examines the changing face of Africa through the demise of a small family farm. Binyavanga Wainaina's "Discovering Home," meanwhile, contrasts a young man's year at home in Kenya after several years of cosmopolitan Cape Town life. Despite a rich diversity of style and subject matter, each story, as described in Ben Okri's introduction, "reveals what hides in people," offering intimate glimpses into an array of African lives. Anyone who enjoys realistic literary fiction will treasure this collection. <BR>Copyright &copy; Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p>
7Introduction to African Oral Literature and PerformanceBayo Ogunjimi0<p>Abdul-Rasheed Na'Allah, Ph.D., has taught African performance, African and African Diaspora literature, folklore and comparative poetics in Nigeria, Canada and the United States. Among his books are Ogoni's Agonies, Almajiri, and The People's Poet: Emerging Perspectives on Niyi Osundare. <p></p> Bayo Ogunjimi, Ph.D., deceased in 1996, was a professor of African oral literature and English at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His critical essays have appeared in journals around the world.</p>Bayo Ogunjimi, Abdul Rasheed Na'allahintroduction-to-african-oral-literature-and-performancebayo-ogunjimi97815922115171592211518$23.95HardcoverAfrica World PressFebruary 2006New EditionAfrica - Anthropology & Sociology, African Folklore & Mythology, Oral Tradition & Storytelling, General & Miscellaneous African Literature - Literary Criticism, African Literature Anthologies, Fables, Fairy Tales, & Folk Tales - Literary Criticism1468.30 (w) x 5.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)This new book puts together in a single cover, two earlier volumes by the authors, now revised to meet the challenges of a twenty-first century scholarship in African performance and cultural studies. Topics covered range from sources of African oral traditions, relevance of cosmology to African oral performance, fieldwork practice and research methodology, archetypes, folktales, myths and legends, performance and stylistic features, to various areas of poetic performances like praise poetry, religious poetry, topical, occupational and heroic poetry, their performances and more. The central theme of the book is performance, and students, scholars and readers are provided with projects and exercises intended to keep them involved in research and performance experience of the oral forms. Teaching and curriculum development suggestions are given to teachers of African oral performances. Important information is provided to guide researchers into a continued exciting experience in the study of and research into African oral traditions. Materials are included from a good number of languages and cultures of Africa including Yoruba, Hausa, Nupe, among others, so that students would be able to explore these important examples as testimony of the richness of the scholarly and cultural resources in African oral traditions.<p>This new book puts together in a single cover, two earlier volumes by the authors, now revised to meet the challenges of a twenty-first century scholarship in African performance and cultural studies. Topics covered range from sources of African oral traditions, relevance of cosmology to African oral performance, fieldwork practice and research methodology, archetypes, folktales, myths and legends, performance and stylistic features, to various areas of poetic performances like praise poetry, religious poetry, topical, occupational and heroic poetry, their performances and more. <p></p> The central theme of the book is performance, and students, scholars and readers are provided with projects and exercises intended to keep them involved in research and performance experience of the oral forms. Teaching and curriculum development suggestions are given to teachers of African oral performances. Important information is provided to guide researchers into a continued exciting experience in the study of and research into African oral traditions. <p></p>Materials are included from a good number of languages and cultures of Africa including Yoruba, Hausa, Nupe, among others, so that students would be able to explore these important examples as testimony of the richness of the scholarly and cultural resources in African oral traditions.</p>
8Violence in Francophone African and Caribbean Women's LiteratureMarie-Chantal Kalisa0<p><p>Chantal Kalisa is an associate professor of francophone studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and in the Women&#8217;s and Gender Studies Program at the University of Nebraska&#150;Lincoln. She is a coeditor of a book in French on the Rwandan genocide.<p></p>Marie-Chantal Kalisaviolence-in-francophone-african-and-caribbean-womens-literaturemarie-chantal-kalisa97808032110250803211023$45.00HardcoverUNP - NebraskaDecember 2009Literary Criticism - General & Miscellaneous, Caribbean Fiction & Prose Literature - Literary Criticism, African Literature Anthologies2365.80 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)African and Caribbean peoples share a history dominated by the violent disruptions of slavery and colonialism. While much has been said about these “geographies of pain,” violence in the private sphere, particularly gendered violence, receives little attention. This book fills that void. It is a critical addition to the study of African and Caribbean women’s literatures at a time when women from these regions are actively engaged in articulating the ways in which colonial and postcolonial violence impact women.&nbsp;Chantal Kalisa examines the ways in which women writers lift taboos imposed on them by their society and culture and challenge readers with their unique perspectives on violence. Comparing women from different places and times, Kalisa treats types of violence such as colonial, familial, linguistic, and war-related, specifically linked to dictatorship and genocide. She examines Caribbean writers Michele Lacrosil, Simone Schwartz-Bart, Gisèle Pineau, and Edwidge Danticat, and Africans Ken Begul, Calixthe Beyala, Nadine Bar, and Monique Ilboudo. She also includes Sembène Ousmane and Frantz Fanon for their unique contributions to the questions of violence and gender. This study advances our understanding of the attempts of African and Caribbean women writers to resolve the tension between external forms of violence and internal forms resulting from skewed cultural, social, and political rules based on gender.<p><p>African and Caribbean peoples share a history dominated by the violent disruptions of slavery and colonialism. While much has been said about these &#147;geographies of pain,&#8221; violence in the private sphere, particularly gendered violence, receives little attention. This book fills that void. It is a critical addition to the study of African and Caribbean women&#8217;s literatures at a time when women from these regions are actively engaged in articulating the ways in which colonial and postcolonial violence impact women.<p>&#160;<p>Chantal Kalisa examines the ways in which women writers lift taboos imposed on them by their society and culture and challenge readers with their unique perspectives on violence. Comparing women from different places and times, Kalisa treats types of violence such as colonial, familial, linguistic, and war-related, specifically linked to dictatorship and genocide. She examines Caribbean writers Michele Lacrosil, Simone Schwartz-Bart, Gis&#232;le Pineau, and Edwidge Danticat, and Africans Ken Begul, Calixthe Beyala, Nadine Bar, and Monique Ilboudo. She also includes Semb&#232;ne Ousmane and Frantz Fanon for their unique contributions to the questions of violence and gender. This study advances our understanding of the attempts of African and Caribbean women writers to resolve the tension between external forms of violence and internal forms resulting from skewed cultural, social, and political rules based on gender.<p></p><h3>African Affairs</h3><p><p>"This study advances our understanding of the attempts of African and Caribbean women writers to resolve the tension between external forms of violence and internal forms resulting from skewed cultural, social, and political rules based on gender."&#8212;<i>African Affairs</i><p></p><article> <h4>African Affairs</h4>"This study advances our understanding of the attempts of African and Caribbean women writers to resolve the tension between external forms of violence and internal forms resulting from skewed cultural, social, and political rules based on gender."—<i>African Affairs</i> </article> <article> <h4>Choice</h4><p>"Including an excellent bibliography, this is an important work in literary and gender studies."—A. J. Guillaume&nbsp;Jr., <i>Choice</i></p> <p>— A. J. Guillaume</p> </article><article> <h4>Research in African Literatures</h4><p>"Kalisa’s analysis of gendered violence is a persuasive and timely study of violence in francophone African and Caribbean literature. It is a significant contribution to the field of women studies and is of interest to any gender theorist, postcolonial specialist, and Africana scholar."—Cheikh Thiam, <i>Research in African Literatures</i></p> <p>— Cheikh Thiam</p> </article> <article> <h4>Choice</h4>"Including an excellent bibliography, this is an important work in literary and gender studies."—A. J. Guillaume&nbsp;Jr., <i>Choice</i> </article> <article> <h4>Research in African Literatures</h4>"Kalisa's analysis of gendered violence is a persuasive and timely study of violence in francophone African and Caribbean literature. It is a significant contribution to the field of women studies and is of interest to any gender theorist, postcolonial specialist, and Africana scholar."—Cheikh Thiam, <i>Research in African Literatures</i> </article>
9Oral Epics from AfricaJohn William Johnson0John William Johnson, Thomas A. Hale, Stephen (Eds.) Belcher, Thomas A. Hale (Editor), Stephen Belcheroral-epics-from-africajohn-william-johnson97802532111010253211107$24.95PaperbackIndiana University PressMarch 20081st EditionLiterary Criticism, African<p><P>"The editors... must be congratulated... Long live the African storytellers!" &#151; Africa Today<P>"It is difficult to imagine a more practical introduction to contemporary African epic than this anthology... no other single volume comprehends the full scope of African epic (as opposed to praise poetry) the way this one does.... The stories are engaging, and the free-verse translations are surprisingly readable.... Recommended for all academic collections." &#151; Choice<P>Western culture traces its literary heritage to such well-known epics as the Iliad and the Odyssey and Gilgamesh. But it is only recently that scholars have turned their attention toward capturing the rich oral tradition that is still alive in Africa today. These 25 selections introduce English-speaking readers to the extensive epic traditions in Africa.</p><table><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction: The Oral Epic in Africa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Soninke Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">3</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Wagadu</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">4</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mande Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">8</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Son-Jara (Maninka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">11</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Fa-Jigi (Wasulunka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Bamana Segu (Bamana)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">34</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Sonsan of Kaarta (Bamana)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">50</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Almami Samori Toure (Bamana)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">68</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Musadu (Maninka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">80</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">8</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Kelefa Saane (Mandinka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">92</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">9</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Kambili (Wasulunka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">100</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">10</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Sara (Maninka)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">114</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Songhay and Zarma Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">124</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">11</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Askia Mohammed</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">126</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">12</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Mali Bero</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">133</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">13</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Issa Korombe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">140</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fulbe Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">147</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">14</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Hambodedio and Saigalare</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">149</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">15</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Silamaka and Poullori</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">162</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">16</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Silamaka and Hambodedio</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">172</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">17</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Samba Gueladio Diegui</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">185</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Wolof Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">200</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">18</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Njaajaan Njaay</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">201</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">19</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Lat Dior</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">211</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Egyptian Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">227</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">20</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of the Bani Hilal: The Birth of the Horo Abu Zayd. I. (Northern Egypt)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">228</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">21</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Bani Hilal: The Birth of Abu Zayd. II (Southern Egypt)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">240</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Central African Epics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">255</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">22</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Mvet Moneblum, or The Blue Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">257</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">23</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Jeki la Njambe Inono</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">274</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">baNyanga Epics of Zaire</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">285</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">24</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Mwindo Epic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">286</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">25</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Epic of Kahindo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">294</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bibliography</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">303</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">315</TD></table>
10African Fundamentalism: A Literary and Cultural Anthology of Garvey's Harlem RenaissanceTony Martin0Tony Martinafrican-fundamentalismtony-martin97809124690960912469099$14.95HardcoverMajority Press, Incorporated, TheOctober 1991Literary Criticism, General3635.31 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.85 (d)
11Land Apart: A South African ReaderVarious0Various, Andre Brink, J. M. Coetzeeland-apartvarious97801401000440140100040$12.71PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)June 1987African Literature Anthologies2565.08 (w) x 7.74 (h) x 0.56 (d)
12Women Writing Africa: The Eastern RegionAmandina Lihamba0<p><P>Amandina Lihamba is Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Dar Es Salaam University, in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. She holds a degree in film studies from UCLA. Fulata L. Moyo has been Coordinator of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Malawi, in Zomba, Malawi. She is now working on a doctorate in religious studies at Lutheran Theological Institute in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Mugyabuso M. Mulokozi is Director of the Institute of Kiswahili Research at Dar Es Salaam University in Tanzania. He is a scholar, a well-known poet, and translator. Naomi L. Shitemi, was a coordinator of the Department of Kiswahili and other African Languages at Moi University, in Eldoret, Kenya. She is now Dean of a division in that university.</p>Amandina Lihamba (Editor), Fulata L. Moyo (Editor), Mugaybuso M. Mulokoziwomen-writing-africaamandina-lihamba97815586153421558615342$29.95PaperbackFeminist Press at CUNY, TheFebruary 2007Social Sciences, Women's Studies<p><P>Third installment of major literary and scholarly project exposes East African women's history and culture.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p><P>The third volume from the Women Writing Africa Project makes a significant contribution to the study of African literature and offers a textured portrait of women's lives in Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. These pieces span the centuries from 1711 to 2003, address topics ranging from religion to HIV and represent prose and poetry, fiction and nonfiction, lullabies and protest songs. Marriage is a theme that runs throughout: "A Mother's Advice and Prayer" from 1858 is a nuptial manual in verse, and "I Want a Divorce," taken from a 1922 court record, gives a valuable glimpse of the power struggles between husband and wife. On a lighter note, a collection of recent song lyrics complains about useless husbands and lovers. Many 20th-century writers address colonialism and independence: Penina Muhando Mlama's "Creating in the Mother-Tongue" looks at the linguistic, literary and socioeconomic obstacles to writing in indigenous languages. The editors' lucid introduction usefully contextualizes these wonderful writings, and this volume will be especially welcome in college classrooms. General readers who want to be entertained, educated and chastened about women's struggles and triumphs in east Africa will delight in this literary feast. <I>(July)</I></P>Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information</p>
13Nobody Ever Said AIDS: Poems and Stories from Southern AfricaNobantu Rasebotsa0<p>Nobantu Rasebotsa is the dean of the faculty of humanities and lectures in the department of English at the University of Botswana. <p>Meg Samuelson is completing her doctoral dissertation at the University of Cape Town and has been involved with HIV/AIDS projects. She is the coordinator of the "Share Your Story about HIV/AIDS" creative writing competition.</p>Nobantu Rasebotsa (Editor), Kylie Thomas (Editor), Meg Samuelson (Editor), Njabulo S. Ndebelenobody-ever-said-aidsnobantu-rasebotsa97807957018490795701845$22.13PaperbackNB PublishersMarch 2010New EditionPlaces - Literary Anthologies, African Literature Anthologies1925.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)While numerous texts have dealt with the AIDS pandemic in Africa from the clinical, economic, and sociological to the academic and technical this anthology of poems and short stories connects on a human level and reflects an entire society dealing with the challenges of overcoming AIDS and HIV. Well-known writers such as Achmat Dangor, Dambudzo Marechera, and Sindiwe Magona join 16 new writers selected from the "Share Your Story about HIV/AIDS" creative writing competition funded by the Swedish donor foundation, SIDA, and conducted in collaboration with the University of Cape Town. Their intimate stories and poems explore love, sexuality, stigma, and loss, bearing witness to the disease and responding to its silent taboo.<p>While numerous texts have dealt with the AIDS pandemic in Africa from the clinical, economic, and sociological to the academic and technical this anthology of poems and short stories connects on a human level and reflects an entire society dealing with the challenges of overcoming AIDS and HIV. Well-known writers such as Achmat Dangor, Dambudzo Marechera, and Sindiwe Magona join 16 new writers selected from the "Share Your Story about HIV/AIDS" creative writing competition funded by the Swedish donor foundation, SIDA, and conducted in collaboration with the University of Cape Town. Their intimate stories and poems explore love, sexuality, stigma, and loss, bearing witness to the disease and responding to its silent taboo.</p>
14Step into a World: A Global Anthology of the New Black LiteratureKevin Powell0<p><P>KEVIN POWELL is a critically acclaimed poet, journalist, essayist, and public speaker. A former senior writer for Vibe, he has been published in dozens of periodicals, including the Washington Post, Essence, Code, Rolling Stone, the New York Times, George, Ms., and voter.com.</p>Kevin Powell (Editor), Powellstep-into-a-worldkevin-powell97804713806030471380601$26.31HardcoverWiley, John & Sons, IncorporatedOctober 20001Peoples & Cultures - American Anthologies, Literature Anthologies - General & Miscellaneous, African Literature Anthologies, African Diaspora (outside U.S.) - General & Miscellaneous, English & Irish Literature Anthologies4966.48 (w) x 9.55 (h) x 1.48 (d)<p>Step Into A World</p> <p>"Kevin Powell is pushing to bring, as he has so brilliantly done before, the voices of his generation: the concerns, the cares, the fears, and the fearlessness. Step into a World is a kaleidoscope into the world not bound by artificial constructs like nation. John Coltrane recorded ‘Giant Steps,’ which is a riff on the sight and sounds in his muse. Powell plays the computer with equal astuteness." –Nikki Giovanni</p> <p>"Those of us who pay attention were aware that the younger generation of black writers was being smothered by the anointment of talented tenth Divas and Divuses, and their commercial accommodationist ‘Fourth Renaissance. ’This anthology is indeed a breakthrough! It combines the boldness and daring of hip-hop with the intellectual keenness of a Michele Wallace or a Clyde Taylor." –Ishmael Reed</p> <p>"In a culture where videos, the Internet, and other high-tech communication is being consumed like the latest mind-altering drug, how does great literature grow and survive? These writers will answer that all-important question. This anthology provides a clue, a hint, as to where we might be going. They are resisting all this vacant, empty-minded nothingness. Read them. Listen to them. If you don’t, you do so at your peril." –Quincy Troupe</p><p><P>Step Into A World<br> <br> "Kevin Powell is pushing to bring, as he has so brilliantly done before, the voices of his generation&#58; the concerns, the cares, the fears, and the fearlessness. Step into a World is a kaleidoscope into the world not bound by artificial constructs like nation. John Coltrane recorded 'Giant Steps,' which is a riff on the sight and sounds in his muse. Powell plays the computer with equal astuteness." -Nikki Giovanni<br> <br> "Those of us who pay attention were aware that the younger generation of black writers was being smothered by the anointment of talented tenth Divas and Divuses, and their commercial accommodationist 'Fourth Renaissance. 'This anthology is indeed a breakthrough! It combines the boldness and daring of hip-hop with the intellectual keenness of a Michele Wallace or a Clyde Taylor." -Ishmael Reed<br> <br> "In a culture where videos, the Internet, and other high-tech communication is being consumed like the latest mind-altering drug, how does great literature grow and survive? These writers will answer that all-important question. This anthology provides a clue, a hint, as to where we might be going. They are resisting all this vacant, empty-minded nothingness. Read them. Listen to them. If you don't, you do so at your peril." -Quincy Troupe</p><h3>Essence - Patrick Henry Bass</h3><p>Cultural critic Kevin Powell's <i>Step into a World</i> is a watershed moment in hip-hop writing, a thought-provoking book with a broad range of voices, from Ben Okri to Junot Didaz. </p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Word Movement</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Are Black People Cooler than White People?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">15</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">GWTW</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Race Natters - The Chattering Classes Convene on Martha's Vineyard</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In Search of Alice Walker</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">26</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mama's Girl</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">32</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Visible Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">37</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Return to the Planet of the Apes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">40</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Sports Taboo: Why blacks are like boys and whites are like girls</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">42</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Are We Tiger Woods Yet?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">49</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">On the Disappearance of Joe Wood Jr.</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">51</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">She and I</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">53</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">White Girl?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What Happens When Your 'Hood Is the Last Stop on the White Flight Express?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">68</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Texaco</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">78</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Speaking in Tongues</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">80</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Your Friendly Neighborhood Jungle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">82</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hip-Hop Hi-Tech</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">91</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Homophobia: Hip-Hop's Black Eye</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">95</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Death of Rock n' Roll</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">101</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Confessions of a Hip-Hop Critic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">105</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">hip-hop feminist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">107</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">This Is Not a Puff Piece</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">113</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Live from Death Row</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">124</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hit 'Em Up: On the Life and Death of Tupac Shakur</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">133</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Angles of Vision</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">143</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Soul of Black Talk</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">152</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Do Books Matter?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">159</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Other Side of Paradise - Feminist Pedagogy, Toni Morrison Iconography, and Oprah's Book Club Phenomenon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">163</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">She's Gotta Have It</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">172</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">No Entry</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">174</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What About Black Romance?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">177</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"It be's that way sometimes 'cause I can't control the rhyme." - Notes from the Post-Soul Intelligentsia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">183</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Facing Unknown Possibilities: Lance Jeffers and the Black Aesthetic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">195</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The White Boy Shuffle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">203</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Interpolation: Peace to My Nine</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">207</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Epilogue: Women Like Us</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">211</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Sun, the Moon, the Stars</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">213</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Prologue, 1963</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">223</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Emperor's Babe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">227</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">the missionary position</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">229</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Son, My Heart, My Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">238</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Last Integrationist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">252</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">slave</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">256</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Famished Road</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">262</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Stigmata</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">265</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Pagoda</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">269</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">face</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">273</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Peculiar Second Marriage of Archie Jones</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">281</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Baker</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">282</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rika</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Butterfly Burning</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">296</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Intuitionist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">299</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Safari</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Rumor</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fugue</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">308</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Clearing</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">311</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Dream of Jesus</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">311</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">personal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">312</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tat Tvam Asi (You Are the One)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">316</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">One Irony of the Caribbean</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">318</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Legba, Landed</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">320</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Excursion to Port Royal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">322</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dear Mr. Ellison</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">323</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Assam</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">323</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Church Y'all</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">324</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Yellow Forms of Paradise</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">327</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">swampy river</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">329</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from "Awakening"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">332</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sleep</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">334</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">When the Neighbors Fight</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">335</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">You Are Chic Now, Che</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">336</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Visitation: Grenada, 1978</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">100 Times</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">339</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Discubriendo una Fotografia de mi Madre</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">340</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">sometime in the summer there's october</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">340</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Outcome</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">344</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Toi Derricotte at Quail Ridge Books</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">345</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nairobi Streetlights</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">346</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">3 movements</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">347</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Night when Mukoma Told the Devil to Go to Hell</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">348</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Autobiography of a Black Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">350</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Spotlight at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">351</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Blue</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">353</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Patrimony</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">354</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Intermission in three acts in service of PLOT</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">355</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Calypso the outside woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">357</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">358</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">359</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sunday</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">361</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Purple Impala</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">362</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Windows of Exile</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">363</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">gin and juice</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">364</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Collection Day</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">365</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Insomnia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">366</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Shrine outside Basquiat's Studio, September 1988</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">367</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Black Youth Black Art Black Face - An Address</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">371</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">leaving a feminist organization: a personal/poetics</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">374</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">we are trying to (have me) conceive</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">376</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">if we've gotta live underground and everybody's got cancer/will poetry be enuf? - A Letter to Ntozake Shange</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">380</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Binga - Diary Entry</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">385</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Six-Hour Difference: A Dutch Perspective on the New World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">388</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Just Beneath the Surface - An Email</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">395</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">By Invitation - An Open Letter to the President of South Africa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">398</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What Happened to Your Generation's Promise of "Love and Revolution"? - A Letter to Angela Davis</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">401</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Atlantic Away: A Letter from Africa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">404</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Contributors</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">419</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Self-Portraith Radcliffe Bailey, the Cover Artist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">452</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Selected Bibliography of Black Literature</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">453</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Books Essential to Understanding Hip-Hop Culture</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">457</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Permissions</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">459</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">467</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>Patrick Henry Bass</h4>Cultural critic Kevin Powell's <i>Step into a World</i> is a watershed moment in hip-hop writing, a thought-provoking book with a broad range of voices, from Ben Okri to Junot Didaz. <br> — <i>Essence</i> </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>This anthology of young, contemporary black writers generally maintains a precarious balance between authentic discovery and promotional marketing, although the writing varies widely in quality and relevance (some selections are quite riveting, others just self-absorbed). Divided into six sections--"Essays," "Hip-Hop Journalism," "Criticism," "Fiction," "Poetry," and "Dialogue"--the collection presents a broad range of voices and perspectives, although a majority of them are, not surprisingly, from the United States. While some of the texts, particularly those on hip-hop, seem overly dramatic and hyperbolic, some very fine writing emerges in the "Essays" section. Mostly autobiographical, these selections address the very real contemporary problems of black identity in a post-Civil Rights era in which the political battle lines have become much more blurred and the issues of self, nation, class, gender, sexuality, and history are immensely complicated. The items in the "Dialogue" section are the most strident and the most inventive and compelling. Even though this book will mainly be used as a classroom textbook, it could be a valuable addition to larger collections and other libraries interested in offering brief introductions to young black writers.--Roger A. Berger, Everett Community Coll., WA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information. </article>
15An Anthology of Interracial Literature: Black-White Contacts in the Old World and the NewWerner Sollors0<p><p><B>Werner Sollors</B> is Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English Literature and Professor of Afro-American Studies and Chair of the History of American Civilization Program at Harvard University. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including <I>The Multilingual Anthology of American Literature</I>, <I>Theories of Ethnicity&#58; A Classical Reader</I>, and <I>Multilingual America&#58; Transnationalism, Ethnicity, and the Languages of American Literature</I>, all available from NYU Press.<p></p>Werner Sollors, Werner Sollorsan-anthology-of-interracial-literaturewerner-sollors97808147814320814781438HardcoverNew York University PressFebruary 2004Language Arts &amp; Disciplines<p><p>A white knight meets his half-black half-brother in battle. A black hero marries a white woman. A slave mother kills her child by a rapist-master. A white-looking person of partly African ancestry passes for white. A master and a slave change places for a single night. An interracial marriage turns sour. The birth of a child brings a crisis. Such are some of the story lines to be found within the pages of <B>An Anthology of Interracial Literature</B>.<p> <p>This is the first anthology to explore the literary theme of black-white encounters, of love and family stories that cross&#151;or are crossed by&#151;what came to be considered racial boundaries. The anthology extends from Cleobolus' ancient Greek riddle to tormented encounters in the modern United States, visiting along the way a German medieval chivalric romance, excerpts from <I>Arabian Nights</I> and Italian Renaissance novellas, scenes and plays from Spain, Denmark, England, and the United States, as well as essays, autobiographical sketches, and numerous poems. The authors of the selections include some of the great names of world literature interspersed with lesser-known writers. Themes of interracial love and family relations, passing, and the figure of the Mulatto are threaded through the volume.<p> <p><B>An Anthology of Interracial Literature</B> allows scholars, students, and general readers to grapple with the extraordinary diversity in world literature. As multi-racial identification becomes more widespread the ethnic and cultural roots of world literature takes on new meaning.<p> <p>Contributors include&#58; Hans Christian Andersen, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charles W. Chesnutt, Lydia MariaChild, Kate Chopin, Countee Cullen, Caroline Bond Day, Rita Dove, Alexandre Dumas, Olaudah Equiano, Langston Hughes, Victor Hugo, Charles Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Guy de Maupassant, Claude McKay, Eugene O'Neill, Alexander Pushkin, and Jean Toomer.<p></p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>Sollors (English literature & Afro-American studies, Harvard) has compiled the first scholarly anthology that centers on the theme in literature of love and family across, or crossed by, racial boundaries. As Sollors explains in the introduction, "It is a theme that makes for unusual intersections of the plots of love and family relations with issues of society and politics." The anthology contains a broad range of texts, including epics, poems, and novellas, and spans numerous cultures from the ancient to the contemporary. The authors included range from Hans Christian Andersen and Alexander Pushkin to Eugene O'Neill and Gwendolyn Brooks. One is reminded that color was an accidental quality in antiquity and the Christian Middle Ages; that during later times, censure existed; and that, in the United States in particular, interracial marriage bans were not deemed unconstitutional until 1967. As stated in a Rita Dove play: "A sniff of freedom's all it takes to feel history's sting." Recommended for academic libraries and for any reader working around the race rubric.-Scott Hightower, Fordham Univ., New York Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Riddle" (5th century B.C.)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">7</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Parzival (1197-1210)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">8</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Il Novellino (1475)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">69</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Hecatommithi (1565)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Beautiful Slave-Girl" (1614)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"A Negress Courts Cestus, a Man of a Different Colour" (1633)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">8</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"A Faire Nimph Scorning a Black Boy Courting Her" (1658)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">101</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">9</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Inversion" (1657), "One Enamour'd on a Black-moor" (1657), "A Black Nymph Scorning a Fair Boy Courting Her" (1657)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">103</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">10</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"To Mrs. Diana Cecyll" (1665), "The Brown Beauty" (1665), "Sonnet of Black Beauty (1665), "Another Sonnet to Black It Self" (1665)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">107</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">11</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"In Laudem Aethiopissae" (1778)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">110</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">12</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Isle of Pines (1668)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">115</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">13</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Oroonoko: A Tragedy in Five Acts (1696)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">132</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">14</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"On a Young Lady's Weeping at Oroonooko" (1732), "To a Gentleman in Love with a Negro Woman" (1732)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">143</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">15</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Versions of the Story of Inkle and Yarico</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">145</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">16</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Dying Negro (1773)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">152</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">17</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter to James Tobin (1788)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">161</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">18</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Engagement in Santo Domingo (1811)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">167</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">19</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ourika (1823)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">20</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Blackamoor of Peter the Great (1827-1828)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">21</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Quadroons" (1842)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">232</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">22</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Georges (1843)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">240</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">23</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Beyond the Seas (1863-1864)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">253</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">24</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Quadroom Girl" (1842)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">278</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">25</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim's Point" (1848)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">280</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">26</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Pilot's Story" (1860)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">27</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Mulatto: An Original Romantic Drama in Five Acts (1840)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">292</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">28</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Octoroon; or, Life in Louisiana: A Play in Five Acts (1859)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">300</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">29</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Black and White: A Drama in Three Acts (1869)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">30</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Miscegenation: The Theory of the Blending of the Races, Applied to the American White Man and Negro (1863)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">350</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">31</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Madame Delphine (1881)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">383</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">32</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From "The Pariah" (1895)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">421</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">33</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Boitelle" (1889)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">424</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">34</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Father of Desiree's Baby" (1893)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">431</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">35</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Uncle Wellington's Wives" (1899)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">436</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">36</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Mulatto to His Critics" (1918)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">461</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">37</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Octoroon" (1922), "Cosmopolite" (1922), "The Riddle" (1925)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">462</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">38</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Vengeance of the Gods (1922)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">464</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">39</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Hope" (1922)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">473</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">40</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Withered Skin of Berries" (1923)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">476</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">41</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Confession" (1929)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">498</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">42</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">All God's Chillun Got Wings (1924)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">504</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">43</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Near White" (1925), "Two Who Crossed a Line" (1925)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">530</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">44</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Cross" (1925), "Mulatto" (1927), Mulatto: A Tragedy of the Deep South (1935)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">532</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">45</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Mulatto" (1925), "Near-White" (1932)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">559</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">46</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Pink Hat" (1926)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">573</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">47</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Ballad of Pearl May Lee" (1945)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">577</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">48</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Owl Answers (1963)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">583</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">49</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Oxherding Tale (1982)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">594</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">50</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Darker Face of the Earth (1994)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">606</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">51</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Buck (2001)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">634</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">52</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Secret Life of Fred Astaire (2001)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">653</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sources</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">667</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">673</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">About the Editor</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">675</TD></TABLE>
16The Caine Prize 2009: The Caine Prize for African Writing 10th Annual CollectionNew Internationalist0<p><P>The New Internationalist is an independent not-for-profit publishing co-operative. Our mission is to report on issues of world poverty and inequality&#58; to focus attention on the unjust relationship between the powerful and the powerless worldwide&#58; to debate and campaign for the radical changes necessary if the needs of all are to be met.</p>New Internationalistthe-caine-prize-2009new-internationalist97819065231451906523142$16.24PaperbackNew InternationalistJuly 200910Short Story Anthologies, African Fiction, African Literature Anthologies2145.80 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.60 (d)<p><b>The Caine Prize for African Writing</b> is Africa’s leading literary prize and is awarded to a short story by an African writer published in English, whether in Africa or elsewhere. This edition collects the five 2009 shortlisted stories, along with twelve stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop, taking place in spring 2009.</p> <p>Previous winners and entrants include Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Brian Chikwava, Henrietta Rose-Innes, Mary Watson, and Binyavanga Wainaina.</p> <p>The collection will be released in time for the announcement of the award in July 2009.</p> <p><b>This year's shortlist:</b></p> <p>*&nbsp; <b>Mamle Kabu</b> (Ghana), 'The End of Skill from Dreams,' from <i>Miracles and Jazz</i>, published by Picador Africa, Johannesburg 2008</p> <p>* <b>Parselelo Kantai</b> (Kenya), 'You Wreck Her,' from the <i>St Petersburg Review</i>, NY 2008</p> <p>* <b>Alistair Morgan</b> (South Africa), 'Icebergs,' from <i>The Paris Review</i> no.<br> 183, NY 2008</p> <p>* <b>EC Osondu</b> (Nigeria), 'Waiting,' from <i>Guernicamag.com</i>, October 2008</p> <p>* <b>Mukoma wa Ngugi</b> (Kenya), 'How Kamau wa Mwangi Escaped into Exile,' from <i>Wasafiri</i> No54, Summer 2008, London</p><p><P>The best in new short story fiction from Africa's leading literary award.</p>
17Traditions in World Literature: Literature of Africa, Softcover Student EditionMcGraw-Hill0<p>McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide</p>McGraw-Hill, McGraw-Hill Stafftraditions-in-world-literaturemcgraw-hill97808442120290844212024$7.55PaperbackGlencoe/McGraw-HillJanuary 19991Anthologies3207.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)<p>Presents writings from Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, and other parts of Africa, with biographical information about the authors, discussion questions, and writing ...</p><h3>Biography</h3><p>McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide</p>
18Love ChildGcina Mhlophe0Gcina Mhlophelove-childgcina-mhlophe9781869140014186914001X$8.97PaperbackUniversity Of KwaZulu-Natal PressMarch 2002African Literature Anthologies1248.50 (w) x 5.30 (h) x 0.40 (d)<p>Gcina Mhlophe is a poet, playwright, performer and South Africa's favorite storyteller. In this fascinating retrospective collection, she shares her personal journey through the social and political landscapes of the 1980s, with its recollected moments of struggle and transformation along the way. Written in a variety of styles and voices, ranging from anecdotal memory to historical moment to folklore tradition, these simply presented poems and stories are by turns funny, touching, chilling, thought-provoking and absorbing. Love Child is a collection for the new millennium generation. It is valuable not just for the deeply-felt personal and political insights it has to offer, but for the accessible ease with which it manages to capture the seminal moments of black South African history in the preserving amber of the author's personal recollection.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Foreword</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Transforming Moments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the Company of Words</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">9</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Toilet</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">11</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nongenile</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sweet Honey Nights</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">22</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Praise to Our Mothers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">26</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Dear Madam</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">29</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Say No</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">45</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Father</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">47</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Fell in Love</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">53</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Crocodile Spirit</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">56</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sometimes When it Rains</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">62</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nokulunga's Wedding</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">64</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">We Are at War</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">73</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dumisani</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">76</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sitting Alone Thinking</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">It's Quiet Now</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">87</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Dancer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">90</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fly, Hat, Fly!</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">92</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Leader Remember</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">95</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Love Child</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">98</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Brighter Dawn for African Women</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">107</TD></TABLE>
19Seventh Street Alchemy 2004: A Selection of Works from the Caine Prize for African WritingJacana Media0<p><p><b>Brian Chikwava</b> is Zimbabwean writer and the 2004 Caine Prize for African Writing winner. <b>Doreen Baingana</b>,<b> Monica Arac de Nyeko</b>, and <b>Parselelo Kantai</b> were on the shortlist for the same prize. <b>Nick Elam </b>is the administrator for the Caine Prize for African Writing.<br></p>Jacana Media (Manufactured by), Monica Arac de Nyeko, Doreen Baingana, Parselelo Kantaiseventh-street-alchemy-2004jacana-media97817700914501770091459$25.13PaperbackJacana MediaJune 2006Short Story Anthologies, African Fiction, African Literature Anthologies2285.75 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.50 (d)<p>The 2004 winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, Brian Chikwava's "Seventh Street Alchemy" is featured alongside shortlisted stories from 2004, compositions from the Caine Prize's March 2005 Workshop for African Writers, and Charles Mungoshi's previously unpublished "Letter from a Friend" in this inspired collection of work from some of Africa's most promising young and new writers.<br> </p><p><p>The 2004 winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, Brian Chikwava's "Seventh Street Alchemy" is featured alongside shortlisted stories from 2004, compositions from the Caine Prize's March 2005 Workshop for African Writers, and Charles Mungoshi's previously unpublished "Letter from a Friend" in this inspired collection of work from some of Africa's most promising young and new writers.<br></p>
20Women Writing Africa: The Southern Region: Volume 1Sheila Meintjes0Sheila Meintjes, Dorothy Driver (Editor), Sheila Meintjes (Editor), Margie Orford (Editor), Chiedza Musengeziwomen-writing-africasheila-meintjes97815586140621558614060$1.99Library BindingFeminist Press at CUNY, TheDecember 2002First EditionPlaces - Literary Anthologies, African Literature Anthologies, General & Miscellaneous African History, Women's History - Africa, Sub-Saharan5606.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.50 (d)<p>A landmark in scholarship and culture, this volume uncovers the stunning literary legacy of African women, heretofore all but invisible.</p> <p>Beginning with a Sesotho women’s lament song from 1842, this volume brings together poetry, songs, newspaper columns, political petitions, personal letters, and prison diaries, along with little-known works by writers such as Bessie Head, Doris Lessing, Yvonne Vera, Zoë Wicomb, and Nadine Gordimer. Each of the 120 texts in the volume is accompanied by a scholarly note that provides detailed background information, while an introductory essay sets the broader historical stage. Approximately one third of the texts are oral in origin, and few have previously been available in book form.</p><p><P>An essential text for libraries&#151;the definitive collection of women's literatures from southern Africa.</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>This rich resource for scholars and general readers alike is the product of a decade of research by the Women Writing Africa Project. The project, funded by the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, seeks to bring African women's literary voices to the public through four volumes of texts arranged by region. The first volume in this distinctive series presents 120 southern African texts that are rich, evocative, and shaped by endless complexities. The settler colonies, such as Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe, offer the largest body of research materials to be mined. Botswana's lack of colonialism meant that literacy came at a later date than in other countries, so texts are available only from the mid-1920s. Lesotho has older texts, however, owing to the presence of a Christian mission. Spanning two centuries (the 19th and the 20th) and featuring such writers as Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nadine Gordimer, Lauretta Ngcobo, Doris Lessing, and Winnie Mandela, the anthology includes texts that range from songs, poems, fiction, praise poems, and folktales to letters, journals, historical documents, journalism pieces, and oral testimonies. The volume's editors, all South African scholars, have also included a journal by a Boer woman written during the Anglo-Boer War, a testimony before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and songs of female initiation into adulthood. These selections, most of which have never before been assembled or published, often call into question such important matters as borders, language, vocabulary, translation, and colonialism. The lengthy introduction adequately explicates the historical as well as textual meaning, and each text's headnote provides context and useful details about the date of its origin, location, and language. Essential for all academic libraries and highly recommended for larger public libraries.-Neal Wyatt, Chesterfield Cty. P.L., VA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Note on the Women Writing Africa Project</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nineteenth Century</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Song of the Afflicted</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Testimony</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">86</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letters and Land Submission</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">91</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">God's Peace and Blessing</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">96</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Account of Cape Town</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">98</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Mother Praises Her Baby</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">105</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Unanana-bosele</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">106</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Affidavit</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">109</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What the Maidens Do with Rooi Klip</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">111</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter to Miss Mackenzie</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">113</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Story of Ngangezwe and Mnyamana</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">115</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The War in Zululand</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">120</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Lions Who Changed Themselves into People and Married Two Herero Girls</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">124</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Leaving the Farm</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">125</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Portrait of Louisa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">128</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Penelopa Lienguane</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">131</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Testimony of a School Girl</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">134</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1900 to 1919</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Journal of the War</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">139</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Moliege's Vengeance</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">144</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ominous Weather</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">147</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Court Record</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">152</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Women's Petition: Domestic Unhappiness</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">155</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter from Karibib</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">157</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Petition of the Native and Coloured Women of the Province of the Orange Free State</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">158</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Africa: My Native Land</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">161</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A "Little Woman's" Advice to the Public</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">162</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Baster Affidavit</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1920s to 1950s</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Address to the Resident Commissioner</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">171</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Going to School</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">173</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Listen, Compatriots!</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">176</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter to the High Commissioner</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">180</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Inheritance: Two Letters</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">182</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Speech to the Bangwaketse</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">187</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bantu Home Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Social Conditions Among Bantu Women and Girls</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">195</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Story of Nosente</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">200</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">UMandisa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">205</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nation Is Going to Ruination</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">209</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Flight of the Royal Household</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">212</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter from Keetmanshoop</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">219</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Meeting of Herero Women</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">221</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Case of the Foolish Minister</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">225</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Though I Am Black, I Am Comely</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">229</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Song of King Iipumbu</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">231</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Women's Charter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">236</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Presidential Address to the African National Congress Women's League, Transvaal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">240</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">245</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">African Women Do Not Want Passes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">246</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Widows of the Reserves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">248</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">It's Gotta Be Cash for a Cookie</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">252</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Aunt, Stretch out the Blanket</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">254</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1960s and 1970s</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Girl Aga-abes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">259</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Diary of a Detainee</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">263</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Past and Present</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">268</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bus Journey to Tsolo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">271</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Three Court Statements</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">283</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Widow and the Baboons</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">285</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ballad of Nomagundwane</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">287</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For "Napoleon Bonaparte," Jenny, and Kate</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">290</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What of the Future?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">303</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Drift in the Wind</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">306</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I am a Wailing Fool</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">308</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Murmurs in the Kutum</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">309</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tobacco, Sugar Alcohol, and Coffee: These Things Have Turned Us into Slaves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">315</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Man Hides Food from His Family</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">316</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fall Tomorrow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">333</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Old People Give You Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">335</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Emergency Call from the Women of Namibia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Women Are Wealth</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">339</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Poem for My Mother</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">343</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Detention Alone Is a Trial in Itself</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">344</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Basking Lizard</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">346</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Working on the Mail</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">348</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1980s</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Rending of the Veil</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">357</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Haunting Melancholy of Klipvoordam</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">363</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Return Journey</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">372</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Arrested for Being Women</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">375</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Crossroads</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">377</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Kandishiwo - I Don't Know</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">380</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">385</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Citizenship: An Open Letter to the Attorney-General</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">386</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I, the Unemployed</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">390</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Letter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">392</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Our Sharpeville</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">397</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Our Government Is a Glowing Ember</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">398</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For Willy Nyathele</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">400</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jesus Is Indian</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">402</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Children of Namibia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">411</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Praise to Our Mothers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">413</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">T.M.T. [actual symbol not reproducible] T.B.M.G.</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">415</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1990s and 2000s</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Another Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">419</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">War from Within</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">430</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Krotoa's Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">433</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Stella</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">438</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Giraffe Song</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">442</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nhamiwa's Magic Stick</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">444</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Lend Me a Dress": Testimonies on Education</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">446</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Broken Family</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">448</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Dream-Miracle Stories</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">453</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Praise to Mbuya Nehanda</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">455</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Noble Woman of Africa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">457</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Swazi Wedding Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">461</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Izisho Zokusebenza - Work Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">463</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">April 27: The First Time</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">467</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Before the Beginning</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">470</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Price of Freedom</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">471</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ngonya's Bride-Price</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">476</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Testimony: Truth and Reconciliation Commission</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">479</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">We Will Be Leasing for Ourselves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">484</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Writing near the Bone</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">488</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">African Wisdom</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">491</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">War Memoir</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">494</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Birth of This Country's Language</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">500</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bojale - Setswana Initiation Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">506</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Intonjane - Xhosa Initiation Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">507</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mutondo - Nyemba Initiation Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">510</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Setswana Wedding Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">513</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Good as Dead</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">515</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Caring for the Dying</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">520</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Generations</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">522</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Contributors</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">525</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Permissions Acknowledgments and Sources</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">537</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Authors Listed by Country</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">549</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">551</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>This rich resource for scholars and general readers alike is the product of a decade of research by the Women Writing Africa Project. The project, funded by the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, seeks to bring African women's literary voices to the public through four volumes of texts arranged by region. The first volume in this distinctive series presents 120 southern African texts that are rich, evocative, and shaped by endless complexities. The settler colonies, such as Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe, offer the largest body of research materials to be mined. Botswana's lack of colonialism meant that literacy came at a later date than in other countries, so texts are available only from the mid-1920s. Lesotho has older texts, however, owing to the presence of a Christian mission. Spanning two centuries (the 19th and the 20th) and featuring such writers as Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nadine Gordimer, Lauretta Ngcobo, Doris Lessing, and Winnie Mandela, the anthology includes texts that range from songs, poems, fiction, praise poems, and folktales to letters, journals, historical documents, journalism pieces, and oral testimonies. The volume's editors, all South African scholars, have also included a journal by a Boer woman written during the Anglo-Boer War, a testimony before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and songs of female initiation into adulthood. These selections, most of which have never before been assembled or published, often call into question such important matters as borders, language, vocabulary, translation, and colonialism. The lengthy introduction adequately explicates the historical as well as textual meaning, and each text's headnote provides context and useful details about the date of its origin, location, and language. Essential for all academic libraries and highly recommended for larger public libraries.-Neal Wyatt, Chesterfield Cty. P.L., VA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information. </article>
21Of Suffocated Hearts and Tortured Souls: Seeking Subjecthood through Madness in Francophone Women'sValZrie Orlando0<p>Valérie Orlando is Associate Professor of French, specializing in Francophone Studies, at Illinois Wesleyan University. She is the author of Nomadic Voices of Exile: Feminine Identity in Francophone Literature of the Maghreb (1999).</p>ValZrie Orlando, Valzrie Orlando, Valrie Orlandoof-suffocated-hearts-and-tortured-soulsvalzrie-orlando97807391056270739105620$82.00HardcoverThe Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group IncDecember 2002Caribbean Fiction & Prose Literature - Literary Criticism, African Literature Anthologies, Psychology & Literature2180.63 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)<p>Female characters who suffer madness and insanity are strikingly prominent in novels by women writers of Africa and the Caribbean. To find out why there are so many "suffocated hearts and tortured souls" in this literature, Valerie Orlando, who has long studied Francophone text and culture, here closely reads the work of Aminata Sow Fall, Mariama Bâ, Myrian Warner-Vieyra, and Simone Schwarz-Bart, among others. In these women's novels, Orlando finds, madness is the manifestation of a split identity, and in this study she sets herself the task of interrogating the nature of that identity. Francophone women novelists of Africa and the Caribbean—though they come from countries whose unique experiences of colonialism, revolution, and postcolonial regimes have shaped specific and discrete cultures—express a common search for a meaningful relationship between their experience as women to the history and destiny of their nations. Only when "woman"' is understood not as an ahistorical object but as a subject whose lived body is entwined with political, cultural, and economic structures, Orlando argues, will insanity finally give way to clarity of being. Interweaving literary citations with theoretical discussion, Suffocated Hearts and Tortured Souls is just as much a masterful explication of profoundly affecting literary work as it is an essential addition to feminist scholarship and theory.</p><p><P>A striking number of hysterical or insane female characters populate Francophone women's writing. To discover why, Orlando reads novels from a variety of cultures, teasing out key elements of Francophone identity struggles.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction: Writing New H(er)stories for Francophone Women of Africa and the Caribbean</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Politics of Race and Patriarchy in Suzanne Lacascade's Claire-Solange, ame africaine</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">37</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Home Is Where I Eat My Bread: Multiculturality and Becoming Multiple in Leila Hoauri's Zeida de nulle part</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">51</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Self-Loathing, Self-Sacrifice: Michele Lacrosil's Cajou and Myriam Warner-Vieyria's Juletane</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">73</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Out(in)side the Confinement of Cultures: Marie Chauvet's Amour, Colere, et Folie and Mariama Ba's Un Chant ecarlate</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rooms and Prisons, Sex and Sin: Places of Sequestration in Nina Bouraoui's La Voyeuse Interdite and Calixthe Beyala's Tu t'appelleras Tanga</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">125</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">War, Revolution, and Family Matters: Yamina Mechakra's La Grotte eclatee and Hajer Djilani's Et Pourtant le ciel etait bleu</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">147</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Feminine Voices and H(er)stories: Simone Schwarz-Bart's Pluie et Vent sur Telumee Miracle and Aminata Sow Fall's Douceurs du bercail</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Epilogue: Transgressing Boundaries, Reconstructing Stories</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">181</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bibliography</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">187</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">193</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>T Denean Sharpley-Whiting</h4>Orlando has brought together a number of sublimely heartwrenching texts by Francophone women writers with thematic aplomb, if you will. The theme of madness and alienation stretch across what would appear to be dissimiliar works, particular in their own cultural milieus yet united in their "Frenchness"—a source of the women writers' psychological angst. </article>
22Less Than One and Double: A Feminist Reading of African Women's WritingKenneth W. Harrow0<p>Kenneth W. Harrow (Ph.D., New York University) is a professor of English at Michigan State University and is past president of the African Literature Association. He has co-edited Crisscrossing the Boundaries of African Literature, and has published widely on African literature and film.</p>Kenneth W. Harrowless-than-one-and-doublekenneth-w-harrow97803250702540325070253$116.43HardcoverHeinemannNovember 2001Literary Criticism - General & Miscellaneous, General & Miscellaneous African Literature - Literary Criticism, Women Authors - General & Miscellaneous - Literary Criticism, African Literature Anthologies384Harrow's provocative book introduces a psychoanalytic dimension to the study of African women's writing. In so doing, he opens up relatively uncharted terrain in African literary studies.<p><p>Harrow's provocative book introduces a psychoanalytic dimension to the study of African women's writing. In so doing, he opens up relatively uncharted terrain in African literary studies. Comprehensive, nuanced, occasionally lyrical, the book covers an impressive range of hitherto neglected francophone novels that are examined alongside canonical anglophone texts. The author places these texts in their colonial and postcolonial contexts, developing upon, and linking, structuralist theories of colonialism and patriarchy. This study offers a radical new position for those scholars who have long sought alternatives to the liberal humanist bias pervading many studies of African women's writing.<p>Students often struggle with the models employed by feminist and postcolonial theorists such as Judith Butler and Homi Bhabha. The clarity with which Harrow explains the positions of such theorists makes his book an essential companion to, and commentary upon, their publications. Kenneth Harrow's study will be of interest not only to African literature specialists, but also to non-literary scholars concerned with questions about feminism, gender construction, colonialism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonial theory.<p></p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction: Insider Writers/Outsider Theory</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">First Wave and Second Wave African Feminism: Butler and the Question of Gender</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Other (Side of the) Mirror</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jewish Abjection, African Abjection, and The Subject Presumed to Know: Kristeva and Beyala's Tu t'appelleras Tanga</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">43</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Standing Like a Tower: Plagiarism, Castration, and the Phallus in Le Petit Prince de Belleville</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Less Than One and Double: Irigaray/Bhabha, Nervous Conditions/Asseze l'Africaine</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">157</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Division, Disunity, Disturbance, and Difference: Safi Faye's Mossane and the Challenge of Postmodern Feminism</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">247</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">City of Mud and Diamonds, City of Dis: Tanella Boni, Veronique Tadjo - A Feminism of the Cities</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">277</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Conclusion: Rebuilding Dis: Words of a Second Wave</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">331</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bibliography</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">335</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">343</TD></TABLE>
23The Rienner Anthology of African LiteratureAnthonia C. Kalu0Anthonia C. Kaluthe-rienner-anthology-of-african-literatureanthonia-c-kalu97815882649161588264912$30.39Library BindingLynne Rienner Publishers, Inc.April 2007New EditionAfrican Literature Anthologies9006.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.90 (d)
24Oral and Written Expressions of African CulturesToyin Falola0<p><P>Toyin Falola is the Frances Higginbotham Nalle Centennial Professor in History at the University of Texas at Austin as well as a University Distinguished Teaching Professor. Fallou Ngom is the Director of the African Language Program at Boston University's African Studies Center.</p>Toyin Falola, Fallou Ngomoral-and-written-expressions-of-african-culturestoyin-falola97815946064721594606471$26.88PaperbackCarolina Academic PressMarch 2009New EditionAfrica - Anthropology & Sociology, Oral Tradition & Storytelling, African Literature Anthologies2646.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)<p>Oral and Written Expressions of African Cultures challenges the traditional view of exotic and atavistic Africa with a balanced examination of the continent's realities and challenges. It shows how oral and written expressions capture the complexity, concerns, dynamism, challenges and ingenuity of African masses. It brings together twelve scholars from different academic backgrounds who draw from the rich repertoire of music, poetry, literature and the media in the continent to unearth the underlying socio-cultural, economic and political factors that shape African societies in the twenty first century. These scholars discuss issues ranging from political manipulations of popular music in Kenya and Argentina, the role of print media in the democratization process in Nigeria, motivations of "vulgar poetry" in South Africa, contemporary gender issues in the Islamic Republic of Sudan, the perseverance of aspects of African cultures in Puerto Rico, misrepresentations of Africa in Rene Maran's Batouala, the function of "lowbrow fiction" in Apartheid South Africa, female African authors' techniques to counter male dominance, to HIV/AID and the cultural taboos associated with the disease in southern Africa, among others.</p><p><P>Oral and Written Expressions of African Cultures challenges the traditional view of exotic and atavistic Africa with a balanced examination of the continent's realities and challenges. It shows how oral and written expressions capture the complexity, concerns, dynamism, challenges and ingenuity of African masses. It brings together twelve scholars from different academic backgrounds who draw from the rich repertoire of music, poetry, literature and the media in the continent to unearth the underlying socio-cultural, economic and political factors that shape African societies in the twenty first century. These scholars discuss issues ranging from political manipulations of popular music in Kenya and Argentina, the role of print media in the democratization process in Nigeria, motivations of &quot;vulgar poetry&quot; in South Africa, contemporary gender issues in the Islamic Republic of Sudan, the perseverance of aspects of African cultures in Puerto Rico, misrepresentations of Africa in Rene Maran's Batouala, the function of &quot;lowbrow fiction&quot; in Apartheid South Africa, female African authors' techniques to counter male dominance, to HIV/AID and the cultural taboos associated with the disease in southern Africa, among others.</p>
25Jambula Tree and other stories: The Caine Prize for African Writing 8th Annual CollectionMonica Arac de Nyeko0<p><p><B>Caine Prize Judges</B> award the Caine Prize to a work (or a short story) by an African writer published in English, whether in Africa or elsewhere. The 2008 judges included Jude Kelly, the artistic director of the Southbank Centre; Mark McMorris, a Jamaican poet and a professor of English; Hisham Matar, the Libyan author of <I>In the Country of Men</I>; Hannah Pool, an Eritrean-born journalist for the <I>Guardian</I>; and Jonty Driver, a South African poet, novelist, and lecturer.<p></p>Monica Arac de Nyekojambula-tree-and-other-storiesmonica-arac-de-nyeko97819044567351904456731$16.18PaperbackNew InternationalistJuly 20088Short Story Anthologies, African Fiction, African Literature Anthologies2145.80 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)<p>The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize and is awarded to a short story by an African writer published in English, whether in Africa or elsewhere. Each year, the full shortlist and twelve other stories are collected and published in one volume.</p> <p>This year’s winner is Monica Arac de Nyeko for <i>Jambula Tree</i>, described as “a witty and touching portrait of a community which is affected forever by a love which blossoms between two adolescents.”</p> <p>Previous winners and entrants include Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Brian Chikwava, Mary Watson, and Binyavanga Wainaina.</p><p><P>The best in new African writing&#151;winner and shortlisted stories from the continent's leading award.</p><P>Caine Prize Stories 2007&#58; Winner and Shortlist<P>Jambula Tree (Winner) Monica Arac de Nyeko de Nyeko, Monica Arac<P>My Parents' Bedroom Uwem Akpan Akpan, Uwem<P>Jimmy Carter's Eyes E. C. Osondu Osondu, E. C.<P>Bad Places Henrietta Rose-Innes Rose-Innes, Henrietta<P>Night Bus Ada Udechukwu Udechukwu, Ada<P>Celtel Caine Prize African Writers' Workshop Stories 2008, (in alphabetical order, by author)<P>Night Commuter Monica Arac de Nyeko de Nyeko, Monica Arac<P>Lost Ellen Banda-Aaku Banda-Aaku, Ellen<P>Where You Came From Karen Hurt Hurt, Karen<P>The Cost Kingwa Kamencu Kamencu, Kingwa<P>Valley of Voices Russell H. Kaschula Kaschula, Russell H.<P>Mrs Siro's Harvest Jacqueline Lebo Lebo, Jacqueline<P>First Time Kgaogelo Lekota Lekota, Kgaogelo<P>The Lost Boy Wam Kaume Marambii Marambii, Kaume<P>Love is like Botswana Rain e Molefhe Molefhe, e<P>The Boulder Henrietta Rose-Innes Rose-Innes, Henrietta<P>Digitalis Lust Olufemi Terry Terry, Olufemi<P>Harmattan Fires Ada Udechukwu Udechukwu, Ada<P>Caine Prize Stories 2008&#58; Shortlist (in alphabetical order, by author)<P>Mallam Sile Mohammed Naseehu Ali Ali, Mohammed Naseehu<P>For Honour Stanley Onjezani Kenani Kenani, Stanley Onjezani<P>Poison Henrietta Rose-Innes Rose-Innes, Henrietta<P>The Day of the Surgical Colloquium Hosted by the Far East Rand Hospital Gill Schierhout Schierhout, Gill<P>Cemetery of Life Uzor Maxim Uzoatu Uzoatu, Uzor Maxim
26Up the Down EscalatorLinda Rode0<p>LINDA RODE was born in Ladismith, Western Cape. She studied at Stellenbosch University, where she obtained an Honours degree in German and a Teacher's Diploma. She taught school in Calvinia, in Hermannsburg, at the Pionierskool in Worcester (school for the blind) and at Herzlia in Cape Town and works as a free-lance translator for publishers. Linda is married to Erwin Rode. They live in Bellville and have two children.</p>Linda Rode, Hans Bodensteinup-the-down-escalatorlinda-rode97807957010610795701063$10.95PaperbackNB PublishersMarch 2010Literary Collections, African<p>The third and final book in Kwela's Young African Writing seriers. It offers an open-eyed view of reality as currently experienced by young people. Without sparing the reader, they raise their views on the rapidly changing social, moral and political fabric of this country.<p>It is an 'open book' for every young person and interested adult; a journey through the fantasies and perspectives of young South Africans at the beginning of the twenty-first century.</p>
27Basali!: Stories by and about Women in LesothoK. Limakatso Kendall0K. Limakatso Kendallbasalik-limakatso-kendall97808698091810869809180$24.44PaperbackUniversity of Natal PressFebruary 1995Anthologies, Southern African History1365.70 (w) x 7.96 (h) x 0.40 (d)Basali! means 'women' and is one of the most common exclamations in the Sesotho language. Usually uttered by a woman and delivered with a laugh, a shaking of the head, or a clapping of hands, Basali! evokes Basotho women's admiration and wonderment for themselves and each other. These stories in 'Sesotho-ised' English reveal a way of life and a way of perceiving experience that is unique in African literature. The stories offer glimpses of traditional healers, circumcision schools, witches, bride-prices, and extended rural family life. There are families disrupted by migrant labour, women and men brutalised by apartheid, teenagers who violate tradition, and middle-class office-workers whose rural families live by a different click than the one that ticks for them. The focus of each story is the decisions women make, the actions they take to protect and to provide for themselves and their children, and to care for the people they love.<p>Basali! means 'women' and is one of the most common exclamations in the Sesotho language. Usually uttered by a woman and delivered with a laugh, a shaking of the head, or a clapping of hands, Basali! evokes Basotho women's admiration and wonderment for themselves and each other. These stories in 'Sesotho-ised' English reveal a way of life and a way of perceiving experience that is unique in African literature. The stories offer glimpses of traditional healers, circumcision schools, witches, bride-prices, and extended rural family life. There are families disrupted by migrant labour, women and men brutalised by apartheid, teenagers who violate tradition, and middle-class office-workers whose rural families live by a different click than the one that ticks for them. The focus of each story is the decisions women make, the actions they take to protect and to provide for themselves and their children, and to care for the people they love.</p><table><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgements</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Three Moments in a Marriage</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Unexpected Daughter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">17</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Lost Sheep is Found</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">24</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Give Me a Chance</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">31</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Arriving Home in a Helicopter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">39</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">How She Lost Her Eye</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">51</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Letter to 'M'e</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">61</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Catastrophe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">64</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Decision to Remain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">70</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Universe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">77</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Why Blame Her?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">79</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The African Goddess: The Figure in My Past</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">86</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What about the Lobola?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">92</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Escape to Manzini</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ask Him to Explain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">104</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">How I Became an Activist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">109</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Basali! A Photographic Essay</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">119</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Glossary</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">128</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Contributors</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">131</TD></table>
28How God Fix JonahLorenz Graham0<p><b>Lorenz Graham</b> (1902-1989) was a pioneer in African American literature. His books include <i>South Town, North Town,</i> and <i>Whose Town?,</i> a trilogy of novels that were among the first to provide an honest portrayal of the lives of African Americans.</p> <p><b>Ashley Bryan</b> is the illustrator of more than thirty titles, many of them with texts he also wrote, retold, or selected. His books have been richly acclaimed and highly honored. <i>Beat the Story Drum, Pum-Pum</i> won the Coretta Scott King Award, and four more of his titles have been selected Coretta Scott King Honor Books. Mr. Bryan lives on a small island off the coast of Maine.</p>Lorenz Graham, Ashley Bryan (Illustrator), Effie Lee Morrishow-god-fix-jonahlorenz-graham97815639769881563976986$16.15HardcoverBoyds Mills PressOctober 20001ST, REVISEDBible - Stories, African Literature Anthologies1607.33 (w) x 10.32 (h) x 0.67 (d)<p>"Utterly delightful" is how Zora Neal Hurston described this classic book when it was first published in 1946. Long out of print, Lorenz Graham's beautiful collection of Bible stories, told in the idiom of West Africa, is available again in an expanded edition newly illustrated by Ashley Bryan.</p><p>"Utterly delightful" is how Zora Neal Hurston described this book when it was first published in 1946. Long out of print, Lorenz Graham's beautiful collection of Bible stories, told in the idiom of West Africa, is available again in an expanded edition newly illustrated by Ashley Bryan. This revised edition includes a foreword by Effie Lee Morris, along with the original foreword by W. E. B. Du Bois. Together they provide an appreciation of the work of Lorenz Graham and his classic book.</p><h3>(Booklist) - Hazel Rochman</h3><p>The son of an African Methodist Episcopal minister in California, Graham taught in a missionary school in Liberia in the 1920s. He wrote this collection of biblical story-poems, which he published in 1946, in the voices of West African teachers and students. Now the collection has been reissued in a handsome volume with dramatic, new, full-page block prints by Ashley Bryan. The stories, great for reading aloud, have the simplicity and rhythm of the oral tradition. Both colloquial and poetic, they bring the holy into daily life. There's Noah ("God Wash the World and Start Again"), Solomon ("Wise Sword Find True Mommy"), Ruth, Samson, and many others. There are also a few selections from the New Testament, among them, "Make glad all people / God's pican be born in Bethlehem." The word pican, with its racist associations to picaninny, may be a problem with some readers, but as Graham explains in his introduction, the original word, meaning baby, son, or child, was used with great tenderness up and down the West African coast. It would be a shame to deprive today's children of this newly illustrated collection, endorsed by leading black authors, educators, and political leaders, because of the occasional use of this word. Most beautiful is the story of the Prodigal Son, told with a dramatic simplicity that's just right for readers' theater: the wastrel son's return and celebration, the good son's complaint to his father ("I work, I work, I work, I never left you. All the time you never kill one small goat for me. How you do me so?"), and the moving reply ("He was dead and now he live. He ain't got nothin. And he hungry"). A book to share across generations.</p><article> <h4>Hazel Rochman</h4>The son of an African Methodist Episcopal minister in California, Graham taught in a missionary school in Liberia in the 1920s. He wrote this collection of biblical story-poems, which he published in 1946, in the voices of West African teachers and students. Now the collection has been reissued in a handsome volume with dramatic, new, full-page block prints by Ashley Bryan. The stories, great for reading aloud, have the simplicity and rhythm of the oral tradition. Both colloquial and poetic, they bring the holy into daily life. There's Noah ("God Wash the World and Start Again"), Solomon ("Wise Sword Find True Mommy"), Ruth, Samson, and many others. There are also a few selections from the New Testament, among them, "Make glad all people / God's pican be born in Bethlehem." The word pican, with its racist associations to picaninny, may be a problem with some readers, but as Graham explains in his introduction, the original word, meaning baby, son, or child, was used with great tenderness up and down the West African coast. It would be a shame to deprive today's children of this newly illustrated collection, endorsed by leading black authors, educators, and political leaders, because of the occasional use of this word. Most beautiful is the story of the Prodigal Son, told with a dramatic simplicity that's just right for readers' theater: the wastrel son's return and celebration, the good son's complaint to his father ("I work, I work, I work, I never left you. All the time you never kill one small goat for me. How you do me so?"), and the moving reply ("He was dead and now he live. He ain't got nothin. And he hungry"). A book to share across generations.<br> —(<i>Booklist</i>) </article> <article> <h4>Children&#039;s Literature</h4>These poems, first published in 1946, are at times profound or humorous, but each reflects the uncomplicated view of an African child recounting the Biblical stories in his own way. As Graham presents the poems, the reader (or better the listener) is aware of the importance of the oral tradition in the West African culture. Graham, a missionary to West Africa in the 1920s, heard the stories and wanted others to share them. In this newly published edition, Ashley Bryan adds detailed black-and-white blockprints to offer visual images to accompany the text. Each story is accompanied by one full-page print. Because of the dialect used by Graham, these stories lend themselves to being read aloud or told. One might question the use of dialect, but Graham's introduction presents the origin of the dialect and offers the proper argument for its use. This new edition would be a worthy addition to a body of African literature. 2000 (orig. 1946), Boyds Mills Press, Ages 5 to 8, $17.95. Reviewer: Jenny B. Petty </article><article> <h4>School Library Journal</h4>Gr 4 Up-A newly illustrated edition of a 1946 title. Using the vernacular English of West Africa in the 1920s, Graham eschewed "Uncle Remus" phonetic spelling, but preserved the idiomatic and idiosyncratic grammar of Sudanic coastal groups (Mandingo, Golah, Kru). Excerpts may sound awkward ("Now you mens they dead," Naomi tells Ruth), but the ear catches on quickly to the meaning of the phrases sung in poetic rhythms. Biblical order is not followed, so the Prodigal Son appears between two Moses episodes, rather than as a Christian parable; only brief accounts of the Nativity, the lost boy-Jesus, and the loaves and fishes come from the New Testament. All of the stories focus on relationships. There is unexpected humor (Goliath's question to David, "Do you mommy know you out?), drama (Goliath's protracted fall), and poignancy (David's mourning). Solomon's wisdom; Joshua's leadership; and the stories of Joseph, Esther, Job, Elisha, and Cain and Abel are among those memorably retold. Bryan's blockprints communicate a simplicity and strength in harmony with the text. Highly decorative in their intricate design, they also recognize the central character and dramatic moment in each story: Daniel embracing the lions, Isaac embracing Jacob. This book conveys a distinctive flavor of West African culture, and offers fresh, piquant seasoning for familiar Bible tales.-Patricia Lothrop-Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information. </article>
29Glass Jars among TreesArja Salafranca0<p><b>Arja Salafranca</b> was born in Spain to a Spanish father and a South African mother. She has lived in South Africa since the age of five. In 1993 she earned a degree in African Literature and Psychology from the University of the Witwatersrand. Her fiction and poetry has been published in a number of local and international journals and anthologies. <i>A Life Stripped of Illusions</i>, her first poetry collection, won the 1994 Sanlam Award for poetry, while her short story, 'Couple on the Beach' won the same award in 1999 for short fiction. Her second collection of poetry, <i>The Fire in Which We Burn</i>, was published in 2000. Arja has worked as a journalist and sub-editor for various newspapers.<br><br><b>Alan Finlay</b> was born in Johannesburg and earned his BA in Philosophy and English at Rhodes University. From 1994 to 1999 he published the literary magazine <i>Bleksem</i>, and later founded the online literary magazine Donga (www.donga.co.za). His own published collections of poetry include&#58; <i>Burning Aloes</i> (Dye Hard Press, 1994); <i>No Free Sleeping</i> (with Donald Parenzee and Vonani Bila; Botsotso Publishers, 1998); and <i>The Red Laughter Of Guns In Green Summer Rain</i> (chainpoems with Phillip Zhuwao; Dye Hard Press, 2002). Alan works in social and media research and lives in Johannesburg with his wife and two sons.<br></p>Arja Salafranca (Editor), Alan Finlayglass-jars-among-treesarja-salafranca97819199312341919931236$44.59PaperbackJacana MediaApril 2005African Literature Anthologies1887.75 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.47 (d)This genre-shattering anthology includes writings in a variety of styles by pensioners, prisoners, schoolchildren, drifting teenagers, praise-singers, and even a few poets.<br><p>This genre-shattering anthology includes writings in a variety of styles by pensioners, prisoners, schoolchildren, drifting teenagers, praise-singers, and even a few poets.<br></p>
30Running Towards Us: New Writing from South AfricaIsabel Balseiro0<p>ISABEL BALSEIRO is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvey Mudd College, The Claremont Colleges, in California. Her work has been published in journals in the United Kingdom, the United States, and South Africa. She is currently editing an anthology on South African cinema and a book on Caribbean literature and culture.</p>Isabel Balseiro (Editor), Isabel Balseirorunning-towards-usisabel-balseiro97803250021180325002118$33.63PaperbackHeinemannMay 20001st EditionAfrican Literature Anthologies2165.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)In Running Towards Us, 31 contemporary authors offer literary responses to the end of apartheid, demonstrating what the creative imagination in South Africa has to offer at the turn of the 21st century.<p><P>In Running Towards Us, 31 contemporary authors offer literary responses to the end of apartheid, demonstrating what the creative imagination in South Africa has to offer at the turn of the 21st century.</p><h3>Internet Book Watch</h3><p>Running Towards Us presents new writings from South Africa from both established and new writers, revealing new subjects and concerns from writers who are now beyond the focus on apartheid. How does one define history and plan for the future? This turns to accepted masters of South African literature and new voices to consider changed themes and perceptions.</p><P>Introduction<br> Running towards Us, Jeremy Cronin<br> Marilyn's Dress, Graeme Friedman<br> Memory, Chris van Wyk<br> The Women Sing, Luvuyo Mkangelwa<br> I'm retelling a womanburning, Roshila Nair<br> Spiral Child, Louise Green<br> Homeland Banter, Pumla Dineo Gqola<br> The Awakening of Katie Fortuin, Finuala Dowling<br> The Puddle, Immanuel Suttner<br> Mind-Reader, Maureen Isaacson<br> moni, Seitlhamo Motsapi<br> At the Commission, Ingrid de Kok<br> Mending, Ingrid de Kok<br> TRC Stories&#58; It Gets under the Skin, Heidi Grunebaum-Ralph<br> Truth Commission, Joan Metelerkamp<br> The Devil, Achmat Dangor<br> Emotions and the Delegates, Jonathan Grossman<br> What's in a Name, Bernadette Muthien<br> Je To Mozny, Edward Lurie<br> The Day of the Boycott, Felicity Wood<br> The WHITES ONLY Bench, Ivan Vladislavic<br> land, Antjie Krog<br> Recognition, David Medalie<br> Excerpt from "Freedom Lament and Song", Mongane Wally Serote<br> Fragments from the Life of Norman Rubarto Paul Mason<br> This Carting Life, Rustum Kozain<br> The Naked Song, Mandla Langa<br> Telegraph to the Sky, Sandile Dikeni<br> Rituals for Martha, Zachariah Rapola<br> Habari Gani Africa Ranting, Lesego Rampolokeng<br> Tiresias in the City of Heroes, Karen Press<br> Eternity is a Hell of a Thing to Waste, Natasha Distiller<br> Glossary<article> <h4>From The Critics</h4>Running Towards Us presents new writings from South Africa from both established and new writers, revealing new subjects and concerns from writers who are now beyond the focus on apartheid. How does one define history and plan for the future? This turns to accepted masters of South African literature and new voices to consider changed themes and perceptions. </article>
31Of Suffocated Hearts And Tortured SoulsValerie Key Orlando0Valerie Key Orlandoof-suffocated-hearts-and-tortured-soulsvalerie-key-orlando97807391056340739105639$27.95PaperbackLexington BooksDecember 2002Social Sciences, Women's Studies<p><P>A striking number of hysterical or insane female characters populate Francophone women's writing. To discover why, Orlando reads novels from a variety of cultures, teasing out key elements of Francophone identity struggles.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction: Writing New H(er)stories for Francophone Women of Africa and the Caribbean</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Politics of Race and Patriarchy in Suzanne Lacascade's Claire-Solange, ame africaine</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">37</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Home Is Where I Eat My Bread: Multiculturality and Becoming Multiple in Leila Hoauri's Zeida de nulle part</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">51</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Self-Loathing, Self-Sacrifice: Michele Lacrosil's Cajou and Myriam Warner-Vieyria's Juletane</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">73</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Out(in)side the Confinement of Cultures: Marie Chauvet's Amour, Colere, et Folie and Mariama Ba's Un Chant ecarlate</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rooms and Prisons, Sex and Sin: Places of Sequestration in Nina Bouraoui's La Voyeuse Interdite and Calixthe Beyala's Tu t'appelleras Tanga</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">125</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">War, Revolution, and Family Matters: Yamina Mechakra's La Grotte eclatee and Hajer Djilani's Et Pourtant le ciel etait bleu</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">147</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Feminine Voices and H(er)stories: Simone Schwarz-Bart's Pluie et Vent sur Telumee Miracle and Aminata Sow Fall's Douceurs du bercail</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Epilogue: Transgressing Boundaries, Reconstructing Stories</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">181</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bibliography</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">187</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">193</TD></TABLE>
32An Anthology of Interracial Literature: Black-White Contacts in the Old World and the NewWerner Sollors0<p><p><B>Werner Sollors</B> is Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English Literature and Professor of Afro-American Studies and Chair of the History of American Civilization Program at Harvard University. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including <I>The Multilingual Anthology of American Literature</I>, <I>Theories of Ethnicity&#58; A Classical Reader</I>, and <I>Multilingual America&#58; Transnationalism, Ethnicity, and the Languages of American Literature</I>, all available from NYU Press.<p></p>Werner Sollors (Editor), Werner Sollorsan-anthology-of-interracial-literaturewerner-sollors97808147814490814781446PaperbackNew York University PressFebruary 2004New EditionLiterary Criticism, American<p><p>A white knight meets his half-black half-brother in battle. A black hero marries a white woman. A slave mother kills her child by a rapist-master. A white-looking person of partly African ancestry passes for white. A master and a slave change places for a single night. An interracial marriage turns sour. The birth of a child brings a crisis. Such are some of the story lines to be found within the pages of <B>An Anthology of Interracial Literature</B>.<p> <p>This is the first anthology to explore the literary theme of black-white encounters, of love and family stories that cross&#151;or are crossed by&#151;what came to be considered racial boundaries. The anthology extends from Cleobolus' ancient Greek riddle to tormented encounters in the modern United States, visiting along the way a German medieval chivalric romance, excerpts from <I>Arabian Nights</I> and Italian Renaissance novellas, scenes and plays from Spain, Denmark, England, and the United States, as well as essays, autobiographical sketches, and numerous poems. The authors of the selections include some of the great names of world literature interspersed with lesser-known writers. Themes of interracial love and family relations, passing, and the figure of the Mulatto are threaded through the volume.<p> <p><B>An Anthology of Interracial Literature</B> allows scholars, students, and general readers to grapple with the extraordinary diversity in world literature. As multi-racial identification becomes more widespread the ethnic and cultural roots of world literature takes on new meaning.<p> <p>Contributors include&#58; Hans Christian Andersen, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charles W. Chesnutt, Lydia MariaChild, Kate Chopin, Countee Cullen, Caroline Bond Day, Rita Dove, Alexandre Dumas, Olaudah Equiano, Langston Hughes, Victor Hugo, Charles Johnson, Adrienne Kennedy, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Guy de Maupassant, Claude McKay, Eugene O'Neill, Alexander Pushkin, and Jean Toomer.<p></p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>Sollors (English literature & Afro-American studies, Harvard) has compiled the first scholarly anthology that centers on the theme in literature of love and family across, or crossed by, racial boundaries. As Sollors explains in the introduction, "It is a theme that makes for unusual intersections of the plots of love and family relations with issues of society and politics." The anthology contains a broad range of texts, including epics, poems, and novellas, and spans numerous cultures from the ancient to the contemporary. The authors included range from Hans Christian Andersen and Alexander Pushkin to Eugene O'Neill and Gwendolyn Brooks. One is reminded that color was an accidental quality in antiquity and the Christian Middle Ages; that during later times, censure existed; and that, in the United States in particular, interracial marriage bans were not deemed unconstitutional until 1967. As stated in a Rita Dove play: "A sniff of freedom's all it takes to feel history's sting." Recommended for academic libraries and for any reader working around the race rubric.-Scott Hightower, Fordham Univ., New York Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">1</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Riddle" (5th century B.C.)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">7</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">2</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Parzival (1197-1210)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">8</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">3</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">4</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Il Novellino (1475)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">69</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">5</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Hecatommithi (1565)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">6</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Beautiful Slave-Girl" (1614)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">7</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"A Negress Courts Cestus, a Man of a Different Colour" (1633)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">8</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"A Faire Nimph Scorning a Black Boy Courting Her" (1658)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">101</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">9</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Inversion" (1657), "One Enamour'd on a Black-moor" (1657), "A Black Nymph Scorning a Fair Boy Courting Her" (1657)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">103</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">10</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"To Mrs. Diana Cecyll" (1665), "The Brown Beauty" (1665), "Sonnet of Black Beauty (1665), "Another Sonnet to Black It Self" (1665)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">107</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">11</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"In Laudem Aethiopissae" (1778)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">110</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">12</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Isle of Pines (1668)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">115</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">13</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Oroonoko: A Tragedy in Five Acts (1696)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">132</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">14</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"On a Young Lady's Weeping at Oroonooko" (1732), "To a Gentleman in Love with a Negro Woman" (1732)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">143</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">15</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Versions of the Story of Inkle and Yarico</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">145</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">16</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Dying Negro (1773)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">152</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">17</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Letter to James Tobin (1788)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">161</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">18</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Engagement in Santo Domingo (1811)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">167</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">19</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ourika (1823)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">20</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Blackamoor of Peter the Great (1827-1828)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">21</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Quadroons" (1842)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">232</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">22</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Georges (1843)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">240</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">23</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Beyond the Seas (1863-1864)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">253</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">24</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Quadroom Girl" (1842)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">278</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">25</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim's Point" (1848)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">280</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">26</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Pilot's Story" (1860)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">27</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Mulatto: An Original Romantic Drama in Five Acts (1840)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">292</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">28</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Octoroon; or, Life in Louisiana: A Play in Five Acts (1859)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">300</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">29</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Black and White: A Drama in Three Acts (1869)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">30</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Miscegenation: The Theory of the Blending of the Races, Applied to the American White Man and Negro (1863)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">350</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">31</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Madame Delphine (1881)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">383</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">32</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From "The Pariah" (1895)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">421</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">33</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Boitelle" (1889)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">424</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">34</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Father of Desiree's Baby" (1893)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">431</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">35</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Uncle Wellington's Wives" (1899)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">436</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">36</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Mulatto to His Critics" (1918)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">461</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">37</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Octoroon" (1922), "Cosmopolite" (1922), "The Riddle" (1925)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">462</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">38</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Vengeance of the Gods (1922)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">464</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">39</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Hope" (1922)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">473</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">40</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Withered Skin of Berries" (1923)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">476</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">41</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Confession" (1929)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">498</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">42</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">All God's Chillun Got Wings (1924)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">504</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">43</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Near White" (1925), "Two Who Crossed a Line" (1925)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">530</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">44</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Cross" (1925), "Mulatto" (1927), Mulatto: A Tragedy of the Deep South (1935)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">532</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">45</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Mulatto" (1925), "Near-White" (1932)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">559</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">46</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Pink Hat" (1926)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">573</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">47</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Ballad of Pearl May Lee" (1945)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">577</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">48</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Owl Answers (1963)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">583</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">49</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Oxherding Tale (1982)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">594</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">50</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Darker Face of the Earth (1994)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">606</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">51</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Buck (2001)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">634</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">52</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From The Secret Life of Fred Astaire (2001)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">653</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sources</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">667</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">673</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">About the Editor</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">675</TD></TABLE>
33Among the BlacksRon Padgett0Ron Padgett, Raymond Rousselamong-the-blacksron-padgett97809396910290939691027$14.00PaperbackAvenue BOctober 1988African Literature Anthologies645.30 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)<br> Fiction. African American Studies. Translated from the French. AMONG THE BLACKS consists of two works: Ron Padgett's translation of Raymond Roussel's early story "Parmi les noirs," first published in 1935 in his book Comment j'ai ecrit certain de mes livres, together with Padgett's memoir focusing upon his own experience among black people. Roussel's story, about a master mariner named White who encounters an African chief named Booltable, is built upon the kind of whimsical and extravagant word play (its first and last sentences are identical except for one letter in one word--"pooltable"/ "Booltable") for which Roussel was idolized by the French Surrealists. In contrast, as he writes in his Afterword, Padgett's memoir "grew out of the nagging need to come to grips with the frustrations of being a white American who had grown up in a racist environment and who, despite his rejections of racism at an early age, had rarely felt unselfconscious in the company of a black person." "What he leaves us with is a work that is like the perfectly preserved temple of a cult which has disappeared without a trace, or a complicated set of tools whose use cannot be discovered. But even though we may never be able to 'use' [Roussel's] work in the way he hoped, we can still admire its inhuman beauty, and be stirred by a language that seems always on the point of revealing its secret, of pointing the way back to the 'republic of dreams' whose insignia blazed on his forehead"--John Ashbery.
34The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents Earth (the Book): A Visitor's Guide to the Human RaceJon Stewart0<p>Jon Stewart was born in <ST1&#58;STATE w&#58;st="on">New York</ST1&#58;STATE> and lives with his wife and children in <ST1&#58;CITY w&#58;st="on"><ST1&#58;PLACE w&#58;st="on">New York City</ST1&#58;PLACE></ST1&#58;CITY>.</p>Jon Stewartthe-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-presents-earthjon-stewart9780446579223044657922X$1.99HardcoverGrand Central PublishingSeptember 2010Humor2448.40 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)<p>The eagerly awaited new book from the Emmy-winning, Oscar-hosting, <b>Daily Show-</b>anchoring Jon Stewart—the man behind the megaseller <b>America (The Book)</b>.</p> <p>Where do we come from? Who created us? Why are we here? These questions have puzzled us since the dawn of time, but when it became apparent to Jon Stewart and the writers of <b>The Daily Show</b> that the world was about to end, they embarked on a massive mission to write a book that summed up the human race: What we looked like; what we accomplished; our achievements in society, government, religion, science and culture — all in a tome of approximately 256 pages with lots of color photos, graphs and charts.</p> <p>After two weeks of hard work, they had their book. EARTH (The Book) is the definitive guide to our species. With their trademark wit, irreverence, and intelligence, Stewart and his team will posthumously answer all of life's most hard-hitting questions, completely unburdened by objectivity, journalistic integrity, or even accuracy.</p> <p>Also available as an ebook and as an audiobook.</p><p><P>The eagerly awaited new book from the Emmy-winning, Oscar-hosting, <b>Daily Show-</b>anchoring Jon Stewart&#151;the man behind the megaseller <b>America (The Book)</b>. <P>Where do we come from? Who created us? Why are we here? These questions have puzzled us since the dawn of time, but when it became apparent to Jon Stewart and the writers of <b>The Daily Show</b> that the world was about to end, they embarked on a massive mission to write a book that summed up the human race&#58; What we looked like; what we accomplished; our achievements in society, government, religion, science and culture &#151; all in a tome of approximately 256 pages with lots of color photos, graphs and charts. <P>After two weeks of hard work, they had their book. EARTH (The Book) is the definitive guide to our species. With their trademark wit, irreverence, and intelligence, Stewart and his team will posthumously answer all of life's most hard-hitting questions, completely unburdened by objectivity, journalistic integrity, or even accuracy.</p><h3>The New York Times - Janet Maslin</h3><p>Like the "Daily Show" this parody delivers wittily framed absurdities in a sweetly deadpan way&#8230;like the show, [it's] best when it takes on subjects of real substance&#8230;That's why the funniest material is about religion and science.</p><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4>Starred Review. <p>Eight-time Emmy-winner Stewart (America: The Book) seeks to expand his audience to aliens who might land on earth after the extinction of the human race and be puzzled over the artifacts we've left behind. "Greetings... on behalf of not only ourselves, but the entire Viacom family," he writes in this laugh-out-loud, rollicking social satire. In place of skits there are elaborate, color illustrations accompanied by captions written with his trademark deadpan humor; for instance, a photo of a mother and baby-elephant holds the caption, "advances in contraception and industrialized food production allowed modern couples to have fewer offspring, while leaving the total weight of families constant." Nothing is off-limits here, not even Benjamin Franklin, whose pithy saying "Nothing is certain but death and taxes" Stewart expands upon. The book ends with a plea to the aliens to reconstruct the human race from DNA in the hope that, with guidance from the visitors, "we could overcome the baser aspects of our nature... and give this planet the kind of caretakers it deserves," revealing the tears behind Stewart's clown. Photos.<br> Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </article> <article> <h4>E.W.com</h4>Has it really been a full six years since Jon Stewart and the writers of <i>The Daily Show</i> released their last book? Well, the delay's understandable. It's a daunting task to cover the history of a 4.5 billion-year-old planet (including the entirety of human existence) in 244 pages. <p>You'll recognize <i>Earth's</i> faux-textbook design and irreverent tone from <i>America (The Book),</i> and some gags recur nearly unchanged — the terrifyingly nude bodies of the Supreme Court justices are replaced here with the terrifyingly nude body of Larry King. But the subject's bigger, and the high concept higher. <i>Earth</i> is written as a Baedeker for the aliens who will eventually discover our planet after our species has expired, likely by our own hand. All the entries, hitting topics like love (''liking another person very very very very very very much'') and work (''that which we didn't want to do, but had to, if we didn't want to eat dirt''), are written in the past tense. It's the ultimate gallows humor: We had it pretty good, and now we're all dead.</p> <p><i>Earth</i> is The Devil's Dictionary for a new generation, twisting our lives in the light and bringing mordant humor to the commonplace. Despite the timelessness of most topics, the writers manage to be pretty lively at times, such as when they refer to the Grand Canyon as ''the biggest rift in Arizona not involving Mexicans.''</p> <p> <i>Earth</i> isn't meant to be read straight through. It's designed to be perused, so you can discover at your leisure all the fun gags and wordplay crammed into its nooks and crannies. Because there are a lot. Enough, in fact, to make you believe this would actually be a fairly comprehensive guide for extraterrestrial visitors, just so long as they have a sense of humor. A–--(Staskiewicz, Keith)</p> </article><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>Following the 2004 Publishers Weekly Book of the Year America (The Book): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction—the Hachette Audio version of which won a Grammy Award—Stewart and the writers of his celebrated Daily Show together narrate this satirical overview of humanity written as though it were being explained to aliens of the future who discover Earth after the demise of all human life. Stewart, the primary narrator, explains religion, history, commerce, government, customs, and society in his trademark delivery. Unfortunately, he often swallows his punch lines, thus defeating the efficacy of many of the jokes. Perhaps his brand of humor is better suited to television. Nonetheless, this is a timely and entertaining title sure to do well among Stewart's many fans, who will doubtless laugh along. Recommended. [The Grand Central hc was a No. 1 New York Times and LJ best seller; see the review of the Grand Central hc, also in this issue, p. 122.—Ed.]—J. Sara Paulk, Wythe-Grayson Regional Lib., Independence, VA </article> <article> <h4>Kirkus Reviews</h4><p>A goofy guide to our planet, with literate ironist Stewart (<em>America: The Book</em>, 2004) at the helm.</p> <p>Continuing in the vein of<em>America</em>, but with a touch more detail in both words and images, Stewart and his<em>Daily Show</em>comrades posit that someday soon the ETs we've been hailing for all these decades will arrive—only to find us gone. And why would we not be here? Well, Stewart relegates the possible answers to an appendix that opens, "At some point between the time this was written and the time you are reading it, we perished." Some of those possibilities include ecological catastrophe, nuclear holocaust, disease, robot rebellion and rapture—the last with a generous 30:1 chance of occurring, and evidenced by an "overall 'Jesus-y' feeling in the air." To gauge by the rest of the book, however, the end may well come by dint of our soufflé-like culture's having finally become too airy and collapsed. So it is that<em>Earth</em>is studded with images of all those pop-culture and media figures that one would gladly leave the planet to escape, from Bernie Madoff to Nicole Kidman and J-Lo (or, if not J-Lo, a convincing simulacrum). Stewart lampoons with a broad brush rather than the scalpel with which he dissects pomposity and prevarication on his Comedy Central show. Some of his targets include creationists and school boards, fast-food restaurants, obesity, the medical bureaucracy, the Venus of Willendorf and, not connected to the aforementioned Venus, the use of the brassiere as an instrument of social control. George Bush doesn't escape, of course; but then, neither does Florence Henderson.</p> <p>The legions of readers of<em>America</em> will know exactly what they're in for—and readers of whatever stripe, save those who are fans of McDonald's and Satan, are likely to enjoy this one.</p> </article> <article> <h4>Janet Maslin</h4>Like the "Daily Show" this parody delivers wittily framed absurdities in a sweetly deadpan way…like the show, [it's] best when it takes on subjects of real substance…That's why the funniest material is about religion and science.<br> —The New York Times </article>
35The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2010Dave Eggers0<p><P>Dave Eggers is the editor of McSweeney's and a cofounder of 826 National, a network of nonprofit writing and tutoring centers for youth, located in seven cities across the United States. He is the author of four books, including What Is the What and How We Are Hungry.<P><P><P>David Sedaris is the author of six books, including <b>When You Are Engulfed in Flames, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,</b> and <b>Me Talk Pretty One Day.</b> He is a regular contributor to <b>The New Yorker</b> and Public Radio International's <b>This American Life.</b></p>Dave Eggers (Editor), David Sedaristhe-best-american-nonrequired-reading-2010dave-eggers97805472416300547241631$11.17PaperbackHoughton Mifflin HarcourtOctober 2010American Literature Anthologies, Fiction Subjects4845.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)<p>An&nbsp;eclectic volume introduced by David Sedaris and compiled by Dave Eggers and students of his San Francisco writing center, who don’t leave a stone unturned in their search for nonrequired gems.&nbsp;Cover art by art by Maurice Sendak.</p><p><P>An&#160;eclectic volume introduced by David Sedaris and compiled by Dave Eggers and students of his San Francisco writing center, who don&#8217;t leave a stone unturned in their search for nonrequired gems. <P>&#160;<P>Cover art by art by Maurice Sendak.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>David Sedaris's unflappable inventiveness translates, in the first section of this anthology, to a smattering of pieces with giddiness, daring, and heart. A particular highlight, by Wendy Molyneux, earned his award for "Best American Woman Comedy Piece Written by a Woman" and is guaranteed to set off snorts of delight with each re-read. In the second section, as in previous years, Eggers's picks prove solid and balanced, if expected. Rana Dasgupta's superb article, exploring India's new wealth and subsequent fallout, as well as David Rhode's profound and gripping account of his seven months as a Taliban hostage reflect not only the literary achievements of 2009, but also the horrors and complexities of these current times on. Meanwhile, Tea Obreht's "The Tiger's Wife" and Kurt Vonnegut's "The Nice Little People" embody the ageless miracles of surprise and originality that comprise the human imagination. (Oct.)</p><p>Editor's Note xi</p> <p>Introduction David Sedaris xv</p> <p>I</p> <p>Best American Woman Comedy Piece Written by a Woman: From therumpus.net Wendy Molyneux 3</p> <p>Best American Sentences on Page 50 of Books Published in 2009 5</p> <p>Best American Magazine Letters Section: From Newsweek Stephen Colbert 8</p> <p>Best American Fast-Food-Related Crimes 10</p> <p>Best American Gun Magazine Headlines 11</p> <p>Best American Six-Word Memoirs on Love and Heartbreak: From Six-Word Memoirs on Love and Heartbreak 13</p> <p>Best American New Patents: From United States Patent and Trademark Office 14</p> <p>Best American Tweets: From twitter.com 16</p> <p>Best American Letter to the Editor: From Bidoun 17</p> <p>Best American Overqualified Cover Letters: From Overqualified Joey Comeau 18</p> <p>Best American Fictional Character Names 22</p> <p>Best American 350-Word Story: From Orion Barry Lopez 23</p> <p>Best American Farm Names 24</p> <p>Best American First Lines of Poems Published in 2009 26</p> <p>Best American Journal Article Titles Published in 2009 28</p> <p>Best American Illustrated Missed Connections: From missedconnectionsny.blogspot.com Sophie Blackall 29</p> <p>Best American New Band Names 37</p> <p>Best American Lawsuits 38</p> <p>Best American Poems Written in the Last Decade or So by Soldiers and Citizens in Iraq and Afghanistan 40</p> <p>II</p> <p>War Dances: From War Dances Sherman Alexie 49</p> <p>Like I Was Jesus: From Harper's Magazine Rachel Aviv 75</p> <p>Burying Jeremy Green: From Shenandoah Nora Bonner 95</p> <p>The Carnival: From Mome Lilli Carré 104</p> <p>Capital Gains: From Granta Rana Dasgupta 137</p> <p>The Encirclement: From Granta Tamas Dobozy 165</p> <p>Man of Steel: From Ninth Letter Bryan Furuness 180</p> <p>Half Beat: From The Greensboro Review Elizabeth Gonzalez 198</p> <p>Gentlemen, Start Your Engines: From San Francisco Panorama Andrew Sean Greer 213</p> <p>Didier Lefèvre, and Frédéric Lemercier. The Photographer: From The Photographer, translated from French by Alexis Siegel Emmanuel Guibert 238</p> <p>What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?: From Tin House, translated from Hebrew by Nathan Englander Etgar Keret 262</p> <p>Fed to The Streets: From L.A. Weekly Courtney Moreno 268</p> <p>The Tiger's Wife: From The New Yorker Téa Obreht 287</p> <p>Breakdown: From Mome T. Ott 308</p> <p>Ideas: From The Paris Review, translated from Spanish by Mara Faye Lethem Patricio Pron 316</p> <p>Vanish: From Wired Evan Ratliff 323</p> <p>Seven Months, Ten Days in Captivity: From New York Times David Rohde 345</p> <p>Tent City, U. S. A.: From GQ George Saunders 395</p> <p>The Nice Little People: From Zoetrope: All-Story Kurt Vonnegut 431</p> <p>Freedom: From Boston Review Amy Waldman 439</p> <p>Contributors' Notes 456</p> <p>The Best American Nonrequired Reading Committee 463</p> <p>Notable Nonrequired Reading of 2009 472</p> <p>About 826 National 479</p><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4>David Sedaris's unflappable inventiveness translates, in the first section of this anthology, to a smattering of pieces with giddiness, daring, and heart. A particular highlight, by Wendy Molyneux, earned his award for "Best American Woman Comedy Piece Written by a Woman" and is guaranteed to set off snorts of delight with each re-read. In the second section, as in previous years, Eggers's picks prove solid and balanced, if expected. Rana Dasgupta's superb article, exploring India's new wealth and subsequent fallout, as well as David Rhode's profound and gripping account of his seven months as a Taliban hostage reflect not only the literary achievements of 2009, but also the horrors and complexities of these current times on. Meanwhile, Tea Obreht's "The Tiger's Wife" and Kurt Vonnegut's "The Nice Little People" embody the ageless miracles of surprise and originality that comprise the human imagination. (Oct.) </article>
36The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents Earth (the Book): A Visitor's Guide to the Human RaceJon Stewart0<p>Jon Stewart was born in <ST1&#58;STATE w&#58;st="on">New York</ST1&#58;STATE> and lives with his wife and children in <ST1&#58;CITY w&#58;st="on"><ST1&#58;PLACE w&#58;st="on">New York City</ST1&#58;PLACE></ST1&#58;CITY>.</p>Jon Stewartthe-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-presents-earthjon-stewart97816078861501607886154$24.98Compact DiscHachette AudioOctober 2010Literary Collections<p><P>The eagerly awaited new book from the Emmy-winning, Oscar-hosting, <b>Daily Show-</b>anchoring Jon Stewart&#151;the man behind the megaseller <b>America (The Book)</b>. <P>Where do we come from? Who created us? Why are we here? These questions have puzzled us since the dawn of time, but when it became apparent to Jon Stewart and the writers of <b>The Daily Show</b> that the world was about to end, they embarked on a massive mission to write a book that summed up the human race&#58; What we looked like; what we accomplished; our achievements in society, government, religion, science and culture &#151; all in a tome of approximately 256 pages with lots of color photos, graphs and charts. <P>After two weeks of hard work, they had their book. EARTH (The Book) is the definitive guide to our species. With their trademark wit, irreverence, and intelligence, Stewart and his team will posthumously answer all of life's most hard-hitting questions, completely unburdened by objectivity, journalistic integrity, or even accuracy.</p><h3>The New York Times - Janet Maslin</h3><p>Like the "Daily Show" this parody delivers wittily framed absurdities in a sweetly deadpan way&#8230;like the show, [it's] best when it takes on subjects of real substance&#8230;That's why the funniest material is about religion and science.</p>
37100 Best-Loved PoemsPhilip Smith0Philip Smith100-best-loved-poemsphilip-smith97804862855350486285537$1.80PaperbackDover PublicationsMay 1995Special ValuePoetry Anthologies965.22 (w) x 8.28 (h) x 0.28 (d)Popular, well-known poetry: "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love," "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" "Death, be not proud," "The Raven," "The Road Not Taken," plus works by Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Coleridge, Shelley, Emerson, Browning, Keats, Kipling, Sandburg, Pound, Auden, Thomas, and many others. Includes 13 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative.<p><p>"The Passionate Shepherd to His Love," "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" "Death, be not proud," "The Raven," "The Road Not Taken," plus works by Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, many others.<p></p>
38The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Seventh Edition, One-Volume PaperbackWayne Franklin0<p><b>Nina Baym</b> (General Editor), Ph.D. Harvard, is Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor Emerita of English, and Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is author of <b>The Shape of Hawthorne&rsquo;s Career</b>; <b>Woman's Fiction&#58; A Guide to Novels by and About Women in America</b>; <b>Novels, Readers, and Reviewers&#58; Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America</b>; <b>American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790-1860</b>; and <b>American Women of Letters and the Nineteenth-Century Sciences</b>. Some of her essays are collected in <b>Feminism and American Literary History</b>; she has also edited and introduced many reissues of work by earlier American women writers, from Judith Sargent Murray through Kate Chopin. In 2000 she received the MLA&rsquo;s Hubbell medal for lifetime achievement in American literary studies.<P><b>Wayne Franklin</b>, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh), is Professor and Head of English, University of Connecticut. He is the author of <b>James Fenimore Cooper&#58; The Early Years</b> (the first volume of his definitive biography, from Yale University Press), <b>The New World of James Fenimore Cooper</b>, and <b>Discoverers, Explorers, Settlers&#58; The Diligent Writers of Early America</b>. He is the editor of <b>American Voices, American Lives&#58; A Documentary Reader</b> and co-editor of <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> and of, with Michael Steiner, <b>Mapping American Culture</b>.<P><b>Philip F. Gura</b> (Editor, 1700-1820), Ph.D. Harvard, is William S. Newman Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture and Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of seven books, including <b>The Wisdom of Words&#58; Language, Theology, and Literature in the New England Renaissance</b>; <b>A Glimpse of Sion&rsquo;s Glory&#58; Puritan Radicalism in New England, 1620-1660</b>; and <b>Jonathan Edwards, America's Evangelical</b>. For ten years he was editor of the journal <b>Early American Literature</b>. He is an elected member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Colonial Society of Massachusetts.<P><b>Jerome Klinkowitz</b> (co-editor, American Literature since 1945), Ph.D. Wisconsin, is University Distinguished Scholar and Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author or editor of over forty books in postwar culture and literature, among them, <b>Structuring the Void&#58; The Struggle for Subject in Contemporary American Fiction</b>; <b>Slaughterhouse Five&#58; Reforming the Novel and the World</b>; <b>Literary Subversions&#58; New American Fiction and the Practice of Criticism</b>; and <b>The Practice of Fiction in America&#58; Writers from Hawthorne to the Present</b>.<P><b>Arnold Krupat</b> (editor, Native American Literatures), Ph.D. Columbia, is Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College. He is the author, among other books, of <b>Ethnocriticism&#58; Ethnography, History, Literature</b>, <b>The Voice in the Margin&#58; Native American Literature and the Canon</b>, <b>Red Matters</b>, and most recently, <b>All That Remains&#58; Native Studies</b> (2007). He is the editor of a number of anthologies, including <b>Native American Autobiography&#58; An Anthology and New Voices in Native American Literary Criticism</b>. With Brian Swann, he edited <b>Here First&#58; Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers</b>, which won the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Award for best book of nonfiction prose in 2001.<P><b>Robert S. Levine</b> (editor, American Literature, 1820-1865), Ph.D. Stanford, is Professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of <b>Conspiracy and Romance&#58; Studies in Brockden Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Melville</b>; and <b>Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity</b>. He has edited a number of books, including <b>The Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville</b>; <b>Martin R. Delany&#58; A Documentary Reader</b>; and a Norton Critical Edition of Hawthorne&rsquo;s <b>The House of the Seven Gables</b>.<P><b>Mary Loeffelholz</b> (editor, 1914-1945), Ph.D. Yale, is Professor of English at Northeastern University. She is the author of <b>Dickinson and the Boundaries of Feminist Theory</b>; <b>Experimental Lives&#58; Women and Literature, 1900-1945</b>; and, most recently, <b>From School to Salon&#58; Reading Nineteenth-Century American Women&rsquo;s Poetry</b>. Her essays have appeared in such journals as <b>American Literary History</b>, <b>English Literary History</b>, the <b>Yale Journal of Criticism</b>, and <b>Modern Language Quarterly</b>. Since 1991 she has been the editor of <b>Studies in American Fiction</b>.<P><b>Jeanne Campbell Reesman</b> (editor, 1865-1914), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, is Ashbel Smith Professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is author of <b>Houses of Pride&#58; Jack London&rsquo;s Race Lives</b>, <b>Jack London&#58; A Study of the Short Fiction</b>, and <b>American Designs&#58; The Late Novels of James and Faulkner</b>, and editor of <b>Speaking the Other Self&#58; American Women Writers</b>, and <b>Trickster Lives&#58; Culture and Myth in American Fiction</b>. With Wilfred Guerin et al. she is co-author of <b>A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature</b> and with Earle Labor of <b>Jack London&#58; Revised Edition</b>. With Kenneth Brandt she is co-editor of MLA Approaches to <b>Teaching Jack London</b>, with Leonard Cassuto <b>Rereading Jack London</b>, with Dale Walker <b>No Mentor but Myself&#58; Jack London on Writing and Writers</b>, and with Sara S. Hodson <b>Jack London&#58; One Hundred Years a Writer</b>. She and No&euml;l Mauberret are co-editors of a series of 25 new Jack London editions in French published by &Eacute;ditions Ph&eacute;bus of Paris. She is presently at work on two books&#58; <b>Mark Twain Versus God&#58; The Story of a Relationship</b>, and, with Sara S. Hodson, <b>The Photography of Jack London</b>. She is a member of the Executive Board of the American Literature Association and founder and Executive Coordinator of the Jack London Society.<P><b>Patricia B. Wallace</b> (co-editor, American Literature since 1945), Ph.D. Iowa, is Professor of English at Vassar College. She is a contributing editor of <b>The Columbia History of American Poetry</b>; her essays and poems have appeared in such journals as <b>The Kenyon Review</b>, <b>The Sewanee Review</b>, <b>MELUS</b> and <b>PEN America</b>. She has been a recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the Mellon Foundation, and the ACLS.</p>Wayne Franklin (Editor), Jerome Klinkowitz (Editor), Mary Loeffelholz (Editor), Arnold Krupat (Editor), Philip F. Gurathe-norton-anthology-of-american-literature-shorter-seventh-edition-one-volume-paperbackwayne-franklin97803939305730393930572$63.03PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.July 20077th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies30086.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.50 (d)Under Nina Baym's direction, the editors have considered afresh each selection and the entire apparatus to make the Shorter Edition an even better teaching tool for the one-semester and brief two-semester courses.<br><p>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field, <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p>
39The Best American Poetry 2009David Wagoner0<p><P><b>David Lehman</b> is the editor of <i>The Oxford Book of American Poetry</i> and the author of seven books of poetry, including <i>When a Woman Loves a Man.</i> He lives in New York City.<P></p>David Wagoner (Editor), David Lehmanthe-best-american-poetry-2009david-wagoner9781615521647161552164XPaperbackSimon & Schuster Adult Publishing GroupSeptember 2009Bargain<p><P>David Wagoner writes about regular lives with plain grace and transcendent humanity, and the seventy-five poems he has chosen for the 2009 edition of <i>The Best American Poetry</i> grapple with life, celebrate freedom, and teem with imaginative energy. With engaging notes from the poets, Wagoner's superb introductory essay, series editor David Lehman's astute foreword about the current state of poetry and criticism, and cover art from the beloved poet John Ashbery, <i>The Best American Poetry 2009</i> is a memorable and delightful addition to a series dedicated to showcasing the work of poets at their best.<br></p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>From the moment series editor David Lehman invokes the myth of Jacob wrestling the Angel in his introduction, the gloves are off in this year's installment of this popular annual anthology. Lehman devotes much of his introduction to throwing jabs at longtime sparring partner and professional poetry grump William Logan, whom Lehman calls &ldquo;wounded&rdquo; and &ldquo;thin skinned.&rdquo; Guest editor Wagoner chooses to abstain from the scuffle, but there's no denying the aesthetic character amassed by the poems he's selected&#58; American poets not only want to talk about their country this year, they want to talk violence in (and toward) their country. &ldquo;They came to blow up America,&rdquo; writes John Ashbery, followed hard on his heels by Mark Bibbins, who warns our fifth state, &ldquo;Connecticut! we're sawing you in half.&rdquo; Denise Duhamel envisions &ldquo;How It Will End&rdquo; (&ldquo;We look around, but no one is watching us&rdquo;) and Rob Cook, in his bold and incantatory &ldquo;Song of America,&rdquo; tells us, &ldquo;I'm raising my child to drown and drop dead and to carry buildings on his back.&rdquo; It appears our poets are at last ready to confront the hysteria and violence of the past eight years, and who can say there's a better year than 2009 to begin. (Sept.)</p>
40The Oxford Book of American Short StoriesJoyce Carol Oates0<p>In a prolific and varied oeuvre that ranges over essays, plays, criticism, and several genres of fiction, Joyce Carol Oates has proved herself one of the most influential and important storytellers in the literary world.</p>Joyce Carol Oatesthe-oxford-book-of-american-short-storiesjoyce-carol-oates97801950926220195092627$19.95PaperbackOxford University Press, USASeptember 1994~Biographies &amp; Autobiographies, General<p><P>"How ironic," Joyce Carol Oates writes in her introduction to this marvelous collection, "that in our age of rapid mass-production and the easy proliferation of consumer products, the richness and diversity of the American literary imagination should be so misrepresented in most anthologies." Why, she asks, when writers such as Samuel Clemens, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, Saul Bellow, and John Updike have among them written hundreds of short stories, do anthologists settle on the same two or three titles by each author again and again? "Isn't the implicit promise of an anthology that it will, or aspires to, present something different, unexpected?"<br> In <b>The Oxford Book of American Short Stories</b>, Joyce Carol Oates offers a sweeping survey of American short fiction, in a collection of fifty-six tales that combines classic works with many "different, unexpected" gems, and that invites readers to explore a wealth of important pieces by women and minority writers. Some selections simply can't be improved on, Oates admits, and she happily includes such time-honored works as Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart," and Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place." But alongside these classics, Oates introduces such little-known stories as Mark Twain's "Cannibalism in the Cars," a story that reveals a darker side to his humor ("That morning we had Morgan of Alabama for breakfast. He was one of the finest men I ever sat down to...a perfect gentleman, and singularly juicy"). From Melville come the juxtaposed tales "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids," of which Oates says, "Only Melville could have fashioned out of 'real' events...such harrowing and dreamlike allegorical fiction." From Flannery O'Connor we find "A Late Encounter With the Enemy," and from John Cheever, "The Death of Justina," one of Cheever's own favorites, though rarely anthologized. The reader will also delight in the range of authors found here, from Charles W. Chesnutt, Jean Toomer, and Sarah Orne Jewett, to William Carlos Williams, Kate Chopin, and Zora Neale Hurston. Contemporary artists abound, including Bharati Mukherjee and Amy Tan, Alice Adams and David Leavitt, Bobbie Ann Mason and Tim O'Brien, Louise Erdrich and John Edgar Wideman. Oates provides fascinating introductions to each writer, blending biographical information with her own trenchant observations about their work, plus a long introductory essay, in which she offers the fruit of years of reflection on a genre in which she herself is a master.<br> This then is a book of surprises, a fascinating portrait of American short fiction, as filtered through the sensibility of a major modern writer.</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>In these lean times, it is difficult to imagine many libraries champing at the bit to purchase yet another anthology of American short stories. But institutions seeking to expand the diversity of their holdings in this area may find this collection the perfect choice. ``Familiar names, unfamiliar titles'' is the raison d'etre for this new volume. Along with some old chestnuts such as ``The Tell-Tale Heart'' and ``A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,'' editor Oates presents many fresh selections such as Edith Wharton's ``The Journey'' and John Cheever's ``The Death of Justina.'' She includes lesser-known minority and women writers such as Jean Toomer and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman alongside stories by newcomers Amy Tan, Louise Erdrich, and David Leavitt. Each author is given a brief biographical introduction. Recommended for serious literary collections.-- Rita Ciresi, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park</p><P><b>Stories include&#58; </b><br>1. Rip Van Winkle, <b>Washington Irving</b><br>2. The Wives of the Dead, <b>Nathaniel Hawthorne</b><br>3. The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids, <b>Herman Melville</b><br>4. The Tell-Tale Heart, <b>Edgar Allan Poe</b><br>5. The Ghost in the Mill, <b>Harriet Beecher Stowe</b><br>6. Cannibalism in the Cars, <b>Mark Twain</b><br>7. The Storm, <b>Kate Chopin</b><br>8. The Yellow Wallpaper, <b>Charlotte Gilman Perkins</b><br>9. The Middle Years, <b>Henry James</b><br>10. In a Far Country, <b>Jack London</b><br>11. The Little Regiment, <b>Stephen Crane</b><br>12. A Journey, <b>Edith Wharton</b><br>13. A Death in the Desert, <b>Willa Carter</b><br>14. A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, <b>Ernest Hemingway</b><br>15. An Alcoholic Case, <b>F. Scott Fitzgerald</b><br>16. The Girl with the Pimply Face, <b>William Carlos Williams</b><br>17. He, <b>Katherine Anne Porter</b><br>18. Red-Headed Baby, <b>Langston Hughes</b><br>19. A Late Encounter with the Enemy, <b>Flannery O'Connor</b><br>20. Sonny's Blues, <b>James Baldwin</b><br>21. There will Come Soft Rains, <b>Ray Bradbury</b><br>22. Where is the Voice Coming From, <b>Eudora Welty</b><br>23. The Lecture, <b>Isaac Beshevis Singer</b><br>24. My Son the Murderer, <b>Bernard Malamud</b><br>25. Something to Remember Me By, <b>Saul Bellow</b><br>26. The Death of Justina, <b>John Cheever</b><br>27. Texts, <b>Ursula Le Guin</b><br>28. The Persistence of Desire, <b>John Updike</b><br>29. Are These Actual Miles?, <b>Raymond Carver</b><br>30. Heat, <b>Joyce Carol Oates</b>
41The Best American Essays 2009Mary Oliver0<p><P>Mary Oliver is one of the most celebrated and best-selling poets in America. Her books include Red Bird; Our World; Thirst; Blue Iris; New and Selected Poems, Volume One; and New and Selected Poems, Volume Two. She has also published five books of prose, including Rules for the Dance and, most recently, Long Life. She lives in Provincetown, Massachusetts.<P><P>ROBERT ATWAN has been the series editor of <i>The Best American Essays</i> since its inception in 1986. He has edited numerous literary anthologies and written essays and reviews for periodicals nationwide.</p>Mary Oliver (Editor), Robert Atwan (Editor), Mary Oliverthe-best-american-essays-2009mary-oliver97806189827210618982728$13.56PaperbackHoughton Mifflin HarcourtOctober 2009American Essays, American Literature Anthologies2245.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)<p>Edited by award-winning poet and essayist Mary Oliver, the latest edition of this "rich and thoughtful collection" (<i>Publishers Weekly</i>) offers the finest essays "judiciously selected from countless publications" (<i>Chicago Tribune</i>).</p><p><P>Edited by award-winning poet and essayist Mary Oliver, the latest edition of this "rich and thoughtful collection" (<i>Publishers Weekly</i>) offers the finest essays "judiciously selected from countless publications" (<i>Chicago Tribune</i>).</p><article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4>Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Mary Oliver presides over this edition of the celebrated Best American Essays series. Quite predictably, this stellar number exhibits a full range of refreshing pieces from a variety of magazines, quarterlies, and other periodicals.\ </article>
42The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Package 2: Volumes C, D, and EJerome Klinkowitz0<p><b>Nina Baym</b> (General Editor), Ph.D. Harvard, is Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor Emerita of English, and Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is author of <b>The Shape of Hawthorne&rsquo;s Career</b>; <b>Woman's Fiction&#58; A Guide to Novels by and About Women in America</b>; <b>Novels, Readers, and Reviewers&#58; Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America</b>; <b>American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790-1860</b>; and <b>American Women of Letters and the Nineteenth-Century Sciences</b>. Some of her essays are collected in <b>Feminism and American Literary History</b>; she has also edited and introduced many reissues of work by earlier American women writers, from Judith Sargent Murray through Kate Chopin. In 2000 she received the MLA&rsquo;s Hubbell medal for lifetime achievement in American literary studies.<P><b>Jerome Klinkowitz</b> (co-editor, American Literature since 1945), Ph.D. Wisconsin, is University Distinguished Scholar and Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author or editor of over forty books in postwar culture and literature, among them, <b>Structuring the Void&#58; The Struggle for Subject in Contemporary American Fiction</b>; <b>Slaughterhouse Five&#58; Reforming the Novel and the World</b>; <b>Literary Subversions&#58; New American Fiction and the Practice of Criticism</b>; and <b>The Practice of Fiction in America&#58; Writers from Hawthorne to the Present</b>.<P><b>Arnold Krupat</b> (editor, Native American Literatures), Ph.D. Columbia, is Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College. He is the author, among other books, of <b>Ethnocriticism&#58; Ethnography, History, Literature</b>, <b>The Voice in the Margin&#58; Native American Literature and the Canon</b>, <b>Red Matters</b>, and most recently, <b>All That Remains&#58; Native Studies</b> (2007). He is the editor of a number of anthologies, including <b>Native American Autobiography&#58; An Anthology and New Voices in Native American Literary Criticism</b>. With Brian Swann, he edited <b>Here First&#58; Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers</b>, which won the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Award for best book of nonfiction prose in 2001.<P><b>Mary Loeffelholz</b> (editor, 1914-1945), Ph.D. Yale, is Professor of English at Northeastern University. She is the author of <b>Dickinson and the Boundaries of Feminist Theory</b>; <b>Experimental Lives&#58; Women and Literature, 1900-1945</b>; and, most recently, <b>From School to Salon&#58; Reading Nineteenth-Century American Women&rsquo;s Poetry</b>. Her essays have appeared in such journals as <b>American Literary History</b>, <b>English Literary History</b>, the <b>Yale Journal of Criticism</b>, and <b>Modern Language Quarterly</b>. Since 1991 she has been the editor of <b>Studies in American Fiction</b>.<P><b>Jeanne Campbell Reesman</b> (editor, 1865-1914), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, is Ashbel Smith Professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is author of <b>Houses of Pride&#58; Jack London&rsquo;s Race Lives</b>, <b>Jack London&#58; A Study of the Short Fiction</b>, and <b>American Designs&#58; The Late Novels of James and Faulkner</b>, and editor of <b>Speaking the Other Self&#58; American Women Writers</b>, and <b>Trickster Lives&#58; Culture and Myth in American Fiction</b>. With Wilfred Guerin et al. she is co-author of <b>A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature</b> and with Earle Labor of <b>Jack London&#58; Revised Edition</b>. With Kenneth Brandt she is co-editor of MLA Approaches to <b>Teaching Jack London</b>, with Leonard Cassuto <b>Rereading Jack London</b>, with Dale Walker <b>No Mentor but Myself&#58; Jack London on Writing and Writers</b>, and with Sara S. Hodson <b>Jack London&#58; One Hundred Years a Writer</b>. She and No&euml;l Mauberret are co-editors of a series of 25 new Jack London editions in French published by &Eacute;ditions Ph&eacute;bus of Paris. She is presently at work on two books&#58; <b>Mark Twain Versus God&#58; The Story of a Relationship</b>, and, with Sara S. Hodson, <b>The Photography of Jack London</b>. She is a member of the Executive Board of the American Literature Association and founder and Executive Coordinator of the Jack London Society.<P><b>Patricia B. Wallace</b> (co-editor, American Literature since 1945), Ph.D. Iowa, is Professor of English at Vassar College. She is a contributing editor of <b>The Columbia History of American Poetry</b>; her essays and poems have appeared in such journals as <b>The Kenyon Review</b>, <b>The Sewanee Review</b>, <b>MELUS</b> and <b>PEN America</b>. She has been a recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the Mellon Foundation, and the ACLS.</p>Jerome Klinkowitz (Editor), Robert Levine (Editor), Mary Loeffelholz (Editor), Arnold Krupat (Editor), Patricia Wallacethe-norton-anthology-of-american-literature-package-2jerome-klinkowitz97803939299420393929949$20.00PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.April 20077th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies28706.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 3.70 (d)<p><b>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field,</b> The Norton Anthology of American Literature has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p> <p>Under Nina Baym’s direction, the editors have considered afresh each selection and all the apparatus to make the anthology an even better teaching tool.</p><p>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field, <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p>
43Early African American Classics (Barnes &amp; Noble Classics Series)Barnes &amp; Noble0Barnes & Nobleearly-african-american-classicsbarnes-amp-noble97814005002841400500281$24.95PaperbackBarnes & NobleOctober 2008Special ValueSlavery - Social Sciences, Peoples & Cultures - American Anthologies, American Fiction & Literature Classics, Slave Narratives & Biographies11.10 (w) x 14.10 (h) x 6.30 (d)Culled from the annals of early African American history, these personal narratives recount the stories of men and women who survived the cruel injustice of slavery to become prominent leaders in the struggle for freedom and equality. <ul> <li><i>Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl</i> by Harriet Jacobs</li> <li><i>Narrative of Sojourner Truth</i> by Sojourner Truth</li> <li><i>Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave</i> by Frederick Douglass,</li> <li><i>The Souls of Black Folk</i> by W.E.B. Du Bois</li> <li><i>My Bondage and My Freedom</i> by Frederick Douglass</li> <li><i>Great Escapes: Four Slave Narratives</i></li> </ul> The <a href="http://www.barnesandnoble.com/classics/index.asp?z=y&amp;cds2Pid=16447&amp;sLinkPrefix"><i>Barnes &amp; Noble Classics</i></a> series offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of <i>Barnes &amp; Noble Classics</i>: <ul> <li>New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars</li> <li>Biographies of the authors</li> <li>Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events</li> <li>Footnotes and endnotes</li> <li>Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work</li> <li>Comments by other famous authors</li> <li>Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations</li> <li>Bibliographies for further reading</li> <li>Indices &amp; Glossaries, when appropriate</li> </ul> All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. <i>Barnes &amp; Noble Classics</i> pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.<p>Culled from the annals of early African American history, these personal narratives recount the stories of men and women who survived the cruel injustice of slavery to become prominent leaders in the struggle for freedom and equality.<ul> <li> <i>Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl</i> by Harriet Jacobs <li> <i>Narrative of Sojourner Truth</i> by Sojourner Truth <li> <i>Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave</i> by Frederick Douglass, <li> <i>The Souls of Black Folk</i> by W.E.B. Du Bois <li> <i>My Bondage and My Freedom</i> by Frederick Douglass <li> <i>Great Escapes: Four Slave Narratives</i> </ul> The <A href="http://www.barnesandnoble.com/classics/index.asp?z=y&amp;cds2Pid=16447&amp;"><I>Barnes &amp; Noble Classics</I></A> series offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of <i>Barnes & Noble Classics</i>: <p> <ul> <li>New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars <li> Biographies of the authors <li> Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events <li> Footnotes and endnotes <li> Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work <li> Comments by other famous authors <li> Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations <li> Bibliographies for further reading <li> Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate </ul> All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. <i>Barnes & Noble Classics</i> pulls together a constellation of influences biographical, historical, and literary to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.</p>
44African-American Poetry: An Anthology, 1773-1930Joan R. Sherman0Joan R. Shermanafrican-american-poetryjoan-r-sherman97804862960430486296040$1.80PaperbackDover PublicationsJuly 1997Special ValuePoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, African Americans - Fiction & Literature, American Literature Anthologies965.29 (w) x 8.21 (h) x 0.25 (d)Rich selection of 74 poems ranging from the religious and moral verse of Phillis Wheatley Peters (ca. 1753–1784) to 20th-century work of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen. Other contributors include James Weldon Johnson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, many others. Indispensable for students of the black experience in America and any lover of fine poetry. Includes 4 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative.<p><p>Rich selection of 74 poems ranging from religious and moral verse of Phillis Wheatley Peters (ca. 1753&#150;1784) to 20th-century work of Countee Cullen, James Weldon Johnson, and Langston Hughes. Introduction.<p></p>
45Couldn't Keep It to Myself: Testimonies from Our Imprisoned SistersWally Lamb2<p>Wally Lamb's books are neither short nor simple; but like a James Patterson of emotions, he pulls readers in and doesn't let go. His affecting novels are marvels of imagination and empathy.</p>Wally Lamb, Diane Bartholomew, Nancy Birkla, Robin Cullen, Brenda Medinacouldnt-keep-it-to-myselfwally-lamb9780060595371006059537X$10.59PaperbackHarperCollins PublishersFebruary 2004ReprintAmerican Literature Anthologies, Penology & Correctional Studies, True Crime3686.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.92 (d)<p>In a stunning work of insight and hope, <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author Wally Lamb once again reveals his unmatched talent for finding humanity in the lost and lonely and celebrates the transforming power of the written word.</p> <p>For several years, Lamb has taught writing to a group of women prisoners at York Correctional Institution in Connecticut. In this unforgettable collection, the women of York describe in their own words how they were imprisoned by abuse, rejection, and their own self-destructive impulses long before they entered the criminal justice system. Yet these are powerful stories of hope and healing, told by writers who have left victimhood behind.</p> <p>In his moving introduction, Lamb describes the incredible journey of expression and self-awareness the women took through their writing and shares how they challenged him as a teacher and as a fellow author. <em>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</em> is a true testament to the process of finding oneself and working toward a better day.</p><h1>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</h1> <b>Testimonies from Our Imprisoned Sisters</b> <hr noshade size="1"> <b>By Wally Lamb and the Women of the York Correctional Institution</b> <h4 class="null1">HarperCollins Publishers</h4> <b>Copyright © 2003</b> <b>Wally Lamb<br> All right reserved.</b><br> <b>ISBN: 006053429X</b> <br> <hr noshade size='1'> <br> <h3>Chapter One</h3> <p>Couldn't Keep it to Ourselves</p> <p>The toy department at the Durable store sold two blackboards. The modest two-by-three-foot model came with wall brackets and a three-piece starter box of chalk. Its deluxe cousin was framed in wood, had legs and feet, and came "loaded": a pair of erasers, a pointer, a twelve-stick chalk set, and a bonus box of colored chalk. I was a third-grader when I spotted that blackboard. Good-bye to Lincoln Logs and Louisville Sluggers. From the age of eight, I wanted to teach.</p> <p>My first students were my older sisters. As preteenagers, Gail and Vita were more interested in imitating the dance steps of the American Bandstand "regulars" than in playing school, but a direct order from our mother sent them trudging upstairs to my classroom. I'd prepared for their arrival: work sheets, white shirt and clip-on tie, alarm clock hidden under my bed for the surprise fire drill. If my sisters had to play, then they would playact. Vita cast herself as hip-swiveling Cookie Crane, as smoldering a third-grader as there ever was. Gail was Rippy Van Snoot, the class incorrigible. I was launching into opening exercises when Rippy reached past me, grabbed a blackboard eraser, and bounced it off my forehead. Cookie shrieked with delight and lit an imaginary cigarette. I forget which reprobate flung my flash cards into the air and made the room rain arithmetic.</p> <p>Fourteen years later I was a high school English teacher with my first actual students. Paula Plunkett and Seth Jinks were the two I remember most vividly from my rookie year. Paula had pretty eyes and graceful penmanship, but she was encased in a fortress of fat. Sad and isolated, she sat at a special table in back because she didn't fit the desks. She never spoke; no one ever spoke to her. In my first-year-teacher naïveté, I sought to draw Paula into the dynamic, thinking group work and class discussion would save her. My plan failed miserably.</p> <p>Seth Jinks was in the twelfth-grade class I'd been assigned because I had no seniority. "The sweathogs," these kids dubbed themselves. I was twenty-one, and so were three or four of my sweathogs. We honeymooned for a couple of weeks. Then one morning I walked up the aisle and tapped Seth Jinks on the shoulder. I needed to wake him up so I could exchange the paperback he hadn't read for the new one he wasn't going to read. "Seth, get your head off the desk," I said. "Here's the new book." No response. I poked him. He looked up at me with little-boy-lost eyes. "Go fuck yourself," he said. The room went quiet. The sweathogs, Seth, and I held our collective breath and waited for my response. And in that uneasy silence, and the days, and months, and decades that followed, teaching became for me not just a job but a calling. I have found special meaning in working with hard nuts, tough cookies, and hurtin' buckaroos - those children among us who are the walking wounded.</p> <p>That said, I did not want to go to York Correctional Institution, Connecticut's maximum-security prison for women, on that warm August afternoon in 1999. I was keeping a promise I'd made to Marge Cohen, the prison school librarian. Marge had called three months earlier, as I was preparing for a twelve-city book tour in support of my second novel, I Know This Much Is True. Several suicides and suicide attempts had triggered an epidemic of despair at the prison, Marge had explained; the school staff, groping to find help, was canvasing the community. They thought writing might prove useful to the women as a coping tool. Would I come and speak? Because I'm frequently asked to support good causes and have a hard time saying no, I keep an index card taped to my phone - a scripted refusal that allows me to preserve family and writing time. That day, though, I couldn't find my card. I told Marge I'd visit when I got back from my book tour.</p> <p>I would never have predicted an author's life for myself, but when I was thirty, while on summer hiatus from teaching, I'd sat down and written a short story on a whim. I liked doing it and wrote another. For my third story, I fused a sarcastic voice to the visual memory of the mute, isolated Paula Plunkett. For years I had worried and wondered about my former student. What had become of her? What had all that weight meant? Who had she been as a child? In the absence of actual knowledge, the life I invented around her remembered image became my first novel, She's Come Undone. It took me nine years to figure out the story of that bruised fictional soul whom I'd fathered and then grown to love and worry over. I loved and stewed over the flawed identical twins of my second novel, too - one of whom had a generous measure of Seth Jinks's anger. What I did not see coming was that the world would embrace these characters also. "Hello, Wally? Guess what?" The caller on the other end of the phone line was Oprah Winfrey. She called twice, once for each novel. The result: best-seller lists, limo rides, movie deals, and foreign translations. Oprah's Book Club had taken my life by the seat of the pants and sent me on the road.</p> <p>Rock stars on tour bust up their hotel rooms. They get drunk or high, trash the furniture with their bandmates, party with groupies. But authors on tour are quieter, more solitary souls. Between appointments, we sit by ourselves in our rooms, nibbling like prairie dogs on room service sandwiches, or ironing our clothes for the next reading, or watching Judge Judy. Perhaps the most surreal moment during my book tour that summer occurred in a hotel room in Dayton, Ohio. While channel-surfing, I came upon the quiz show Jeopardy! at the exact moment my name surfaced. "He wrote the novel She's Come Undone," Alex Trebek stated. In the long and torturous pause that followed, the three contestants stood there, lockjawed and mute, itching but unable to press their thumbs to their buzzers. And sitting on the edge of the bed in room 417 of the Westin Hotel, I uttered in a sheepish voice, "Who is Wally Lamb?"</p> <p>I'm a family man, a fiction writer, a teacher, and a guy who can't say no without the index card. On that nervous first drive to York Correctional Institution, I sought to calm myself with music. I was fumbling with CD cases and radio buttons when suddenly, over the airwaves, a piano pounded and the car shook with the vocal thunder of Newark, New Jersey's Abyssinian Baptist Choir. The unfamiliar song so overpowered me that I pulled to the shoulder to listen. When it ended, I looked up at the highway sign in front of which I'd landed. correctional facility area, it said. do not stop. The inexplicable emotional wallop of that moment fills me with wonder to this day.</p> <p>To gain access to the women of York prison, you check in with the guard at the main gate, hang your laminated badge on your shirt pocket, walk through a metal detector, then pass through a series of ten doors, some of which slide open mysteriously after you stand and wait. You don't see who's flipping the switches, so it's an Orwellian entrance. At the prison school, I met my liaison, Dale Griffith, a warm and exuberant English teacher. Dale and I arranged the chairs in a circle, a uniformed corrections officer bellowed orders from the corridor, and thirty inmates entered the room.</p> <p>Dressed identically in cranberry T-shirts and pocketless jeans, the women came in all colors, shapes, sizes, and degrees of gender identification. Their attitudes ranged from hangdog to Queen of Sheba. Most had shown up not to write but to check out "that guy who was on Oprah." I spoke. We tried some exercises. I asked if anyone had questions about writing. Several hands shot into the air. "You met Oprah?" "What's Oprah like?" "Oprah's cool, you know what I'm sayin'?" Uh, was that a question?</p> <p>At the end of my talk, one of the women stood, thanked me for coming, and pitched me a curveball. "You coming back?" she asked. Thirty pairs of wary eyes were upon me and my index card was back in my office. "Uh, well . . . okay," I said. "Write something and I'll see you in two weeks. Any subject, two pages minimum. Your drafts will be your tickets into the workshop."</p> <p>At session two, fifteen of the thirty chairs were empty. Stacie wanted praise, not feedback. Manhattan said she'd meant to be vague and nonspecific - that her business wasn't necessarily the reader's business. Ruth must have thought she was a guest on Oprah; she'd written only a paragraph, but man oh man, did she want to talk. At age fifty-five Diane was the senior member of the group. For ninety minutes she hunched forward, fists clenched on her desktop. Her suspicious eyes followed my every move. Diane had written under the pseudonym Natasha and had exacted a promise before class that her work would never, ever be read aloud. I predicted she'd be gone by session three.</p> <p>But it was during session three that Diane Bartholomew ("Snapshots of My Early Life") couldn't keep her writing to herself. Her shaky hand went up and she asked if she could share what she'd written. In a barely audible voice, she read a disjointed, two-page summary of her horrific life story: incest, savage abuse, spousal homicide, lawyerly indifference, and, in prison, parallel battles against breast cancer and deep, dark depression. When she stopped, there was silence, a communal intake of breath. Then, applause - a single pair of hands at first, joined by another pair, and then by everyone. Bartholomew had sledgehammered the dam of distrust, and the women's writing began to flow.</p> <p>That was three years ago. I stopped counting sessions somewhere around number fifty. Writers have come and gone: the narcotics-addicted nurse who wrote a moving apologia to a deceased aunt whose support had never wavered; the high school athlete who, a month after graduation, brandished her softball bat during a convenience store robbery and wrote to figure out why; the young alcoholic mother who time-traveled, penning a personal letter to one of the prison's original 1917 inmates, also an alcoholic. The workshop sessions have been a journey rich with laughter, tears, heart-stopping leaps of faith, and miraculous personal victories. There have been bumps in the road, too. Addicts are elusive; they tend to begin promising drafts, take them to some interesting midway point, then give up on themselves and stop coming. There have been trust issues. Prison is not a place where trust is given easily, and a writer who shares her work in progress risks exposure. That risk taking must be honored. Only the writer should decide when, and if, her work is ready for the eyes and ears of nongroup members - ready, in other words, to go public. If another group member breaches that trust, she has to leave. Similarly, a few con artists and drama queens have been handed their walking papers. A functional writing community cannot accommodate the needs of would-be superstars or instigators of the guess-what-she-said-about-you variety. But those have been the exceptions. The brave writers whose work is represented in this volume have acted in good faith, faced their demons, stayed the course, and revised relentlessly. And in taking on the subject of themselves - making themselves vulnerable to the unseen reader - they have exchanged powerlessness for the power that comes with self-awareness.</p> <p>"I started writing because of a terrible feeling of powerlessness," the novelist Anita Brookner has said. The National Book Award winner Alice McDermott noted that the most difficult thing about becoming a writer was convincing herself that she had anything to say that people would want to read. "There's nothing to writing," the columnist Red Smith once commented. "All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein."</p> <p>Michelle Jessamy ("Motherlove") was fourteen when she became pregnant by her teenage boyfriend. Despite the challenges, Jessamy's impending motherhood helped her get closer to her own emotionally distant mother. As she drafted her memory piece, that mother-daughter epiphany emerged as the centerpiece. Then, mid-draft, Jessamy hit a snag. She began writing a flashback to an earlier instance of sexual abuse - a hallway molestation by a friend of the family when she was eleven. The painful incident was integral to the story she needed to tell, but disclosing her long-kept secret made Jessamy feel uncomfortable. She stopped writing. But self-censorship felt uncomfortable, too. Jessamy had worked hard on her essay and wanted to see it through. The solution? A change of genre. On paper, Jessamy became Mo'Shay Shambly, and the pronoun I became she. Mo'Shay had the same hazel eyes as Michelle, the same experiences. But now Jessamy was writing autobiographical fiction. That little bit of distance unblocked her and she finished her piece.</p> <p>Brenda Medina ("Hell, and How I Got Here") was self-censoring like Michelle Jessamy, but for a very different reason. For months after she joined our group, she labored on the same short essay about the death of her uncle Carlos - draft after draft after draft. One day I suggested to Medina that, God bless him, I didn't think I had the strength to attend to poor Uncle Carlos's death one more time. "There's something else I want to write about, but I can't," she told me. That "something" was what had landed her in prison ten years earlier at age seventeen: her affiliation with a violent street gang.</p> <p>York Correctional Institution is vigilant in its efforts to eliminate gang influence within the compound. Incarcerated gang members who choose to uphold their allegiance to "the family" pay a steep price in the form of punitive segregation, loss of privileges, and loss of the "good time" that can shorten their stay on the inside. A self-described punk when she arrived at York, Brenda Medina had traveled a long and difficult road as an inmate, freeing herself from the psychological grip of her "family" and undertaking the rigorous step-by-step process by which an inmate repudiates her gang affiliation and begins rehabilitation in earnest. Even mentioning the name of a gang can cast suspicion that the inmate has reneged on her disaffiliation. Medina's very real fear was that, if she wrote about her past life, her work might be seized, taken out of context, and misconstrued as gang-friendly. If that happened, she could lose much of what she had worked so hard to achieve. My collaborator, Dale Griffith, dealt with the problem directly. She sought and received permission from prison officials for Medina to take up her gang experience as subject matter. With that hurdle cleared, the writer was on her way to a personal essay that, far from glorifying gangs, depicts their insidious hold on young people's lives and the cancerous destruction of their futures.</p> <p>In her much-loved book on writing, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life, Anne Lamott observes: "We write to expose the unexposed.<br> <br> <i>Continues...</i><br> </p> <blockquote> <hr noshade size='1'> Excerpted from <b>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</b> by <b>Wally Lamb and the Women of the York Correctional Institution</b> Copyright © 2003 by Wally Lamb<br> Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. <hr noshade size='1'> </blockquote><p><P>In a stunning work of insight and hope, <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Wally Lamb once again reveals his unmatched talent for finding humanity in the lost and lonely and celebrates the transforming power of the written word.<P>For several years, Lamb has taught writing to a group of women prisoners at York Correctional Institution in Connecticut. In this unforgettable collection, the women of York describe in their own words how they were imprisoned by abuse, rejection, and their own self-destructive impulses long before they entered the criminal justice system. Yet these are powerful stories of hope and healing, told by writers who have left victimhood behind.<P>In his moving introduction, Lamb describes the incredible journey of expression and self-awareness the women took through their writing and shares how they challenged him as a teacher and as a fellow author. <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i> is a true testament to the process of finding oneself and working toward a better day.</p><h3>The Los Angeles Times</h3><p>One truth this book affirms is the capacity for people to change. The writers of <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i> chart their own journeys of growth, navigating the terrain of their internal worlds, their pasts and present prison realities. Who they have become is clear both in self-awareness and what they do with their lives teaching others, advocacy, computer work, construction in prison and out. It is in this change that hope resides; lying next to and rising out of despair, hope permeates the book. Why, in the end, does Lamb want us to care about 10 women in prison? Perhaps because in noticing the humanity of others, we become more human ourselves. &mdash; <i>Kathy Boudin</i></p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Notes to the Reader</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Couldn't Keep it to Ourselves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The True Face of Earth</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Orbiting Izzy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">53</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Thefts</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">65</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hair Chronicles</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">95</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Three Steps Past the Monkeys</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">113</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hell, and How I Got Here</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">143</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Christmas in Prison</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">177</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Faith, Power, and Pants</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">185</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Puzzle Pieces</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">211</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Motherlove</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">245</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Snapshots of My Early Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">267</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bad Girls</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">335</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sources and Suggested Reading</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">351</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4>Wally Lamb's novels <i>She's Come Undone</i> and <i>I Know This Much Is True</i> were both Oprah's Book Club selections and No. 1 <i>New York Times</i> bestsellers. On the surface, <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i> is far different than these works of fiction. In this heart-wrenching collection, Lamb introduces and presents 11 female writers who happen to be convicted felons. Their pieces, as potent as their personalities, would be less accessible without Lamb's modest and disarming preludes. "Prison," he writes, "is not a place where trust is given easily." Obviously, he earned that trust, and we now share its fruits. </article> <article> <h4>The Los Angeles Times</h4>One truth this book affirms is the capacity for people to change. The writers of <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i> chart their own journeys of growth, navigating the terrain of their internal worlds, their pasts and present prison realities. Who they have become is clear both in self-awareness and what they do with their lives — teaching others, advocacy, computer work, construction in prison and out. It is in this change that hope resides; lying next to and rising out of despair, hope permeates the book. Why, in the end, does Lamb want us to care about 10 women in prison? Perhaps because in noticing the humanity of others, we become more human ourselves. — <i>Kathy Boudin</i> </article><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4>Bestselling author and Oprah Winfrey favorite Lamb (She's Come Undone; I Know This Much Is True) takes a cue from Winfrey herself in collecting and editing this book of writings gleaned from a workshop he conducted for the female inmates of Connecticut's York Correctional Institution. The result is an intriguing and powerful collection of unlikely literary debuts. Although the 11 selections cover the range one might expect from writings plucked from a women's prison-tales of broken homes, poverty, violence, teenage pregnancy, race and gender bias, and, of course, crime and punishment-Lamb succeeds in giving the collection an intense, recognizable emotional core reminiscent of his blockbuster debut novel, She's Come Undone. Indeed, each selection bears the marks of Lamb's heavy involvement-the clipped yet elegant prose and the delicate, occasionally humorous manner in which difficult emotional situations are rendered. Standout selections include Nancy Whiteley's opening remembrance of her troubled adolescence and Diane Bartholomew's artfully rendered, heart-wrenching "Snapshots of My Early Life." As a sad footnote, Bartholomew, whom Lamb credits with inspiring the success of the workshop, will never see her opus in print. Sent to prison in 1990 for murdering her abusive husband, Bartholomew was stricken with cancer while serving her sentence and died in November 2001. In his introduction, Lamb calls the workshop "a journey rich with laughter, tears, [and] heart-stopping leaps of faith." To the credit of Lamb and his authors, this book, the end product of the workshop, is as well. (On sale Feb. 1) Forecast: Although this book is a departure for Lamb, fans of She's Come Undone will undoubtedly enjoy it. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information. </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>At the urgent request of the librarian at York Correctional Institution in Connecticut, Lamb (She's Come Undone) organized a writing class for incarcerated women. The intention was to make writing a coping tool that might counter an epidemic of despair at the prison. The 12 pieces in this volume are the best of the students' efforts, and as efforts they are noteworthy, offering memoirs of childhood and acute observations about prison life. In "Three Steps Past the Monkeys," Nancy Birkla chronicles her dependence on drugs by describing her early dependence on candy. In "Christmas in Prison," Robin Cullen describes a congregation at a prison church service as "a rainbow of skin tones, their chocolate, honey vanilla, and raspberry ripple-colored hair topped with crocheted red scrunchies that sit like cherries atop ice cream parlor hairdos." All in all, the volume represents good student writing and a success from everyone's point of view. If it is vying for shelf space with professional writers, it will probably (and justifiably) lose out. But if funds permit, it is worth considering.-Frances Sandiford, formerly with Green Haven Correctional Facility Lib., Stormville, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information. </article> <article> <h4>Kirkus Reviews</h4>Intense attestations of lives that ran afoul of the law, from women who have done or are doing time at a prison in Connecticut. Bestselling novelist Lamb (I Know This Much Is True, 1998, etc.) teaches a course in writing at the York Correctional Institution, and he offers here a selection of ten works from the women in his class, plus one by his co-instructor. The pieces are uniformly wrenching, reported from desperate circumstances by authors doomed to punishment. Yet they are as far from self-pity as possible, written by extremely self-aware authors who give a clear sense of setting out to take some degree of control of their destinies. Each piece is a probing re-examination of its author’s life and of the reasons she ended up in prison. Some recount childhoods taxing by any yardstick, years of learning to become "experts at detecting the slightest barometric fluctuations of Storm Mom," or of being raped by a father who’d just lost the house in a card game—and, at term, having the baby spirited away before its mother was allowed to touch him. There are demons aplenty, inner ones begging to be tamed by drugs, and outer ones, like husbands, uncontrollable (one woman asks, "Why do I feel safer here in prison than I felt at home?"). The maximum-security prison is a tough house, and prospects of release for some of the writers are dim: "Ineligible for parole, I have served the first nine years of my twenty-five year sentence. I am 27." This same person will also say, "I’m kept afloat by my writing." And her writing, like other of the women’s, is lean, with the momentum and clarity needed for its work of helping frame and make sense of these authors’ situations. There are things, says Lamb,that need "to be known about prison and prisoners. There are misconceptions to be abandoned, biases to be dropped." Here’s a step in that direction. </article>
46The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Shorter 5th EditionMargaret Ferguson0<p><b>Margaret Ferguson</b> (Ph.D. Yale University) is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California&mdash;Davis. She is author of <b>Dido&rsquo;s Daughters&#58; Literacy, Gender, and Empire in Early Modern England and France</b> (2003) and <b>Trials of Desire&#58; Renaissance Defenses of Poetry</b> (1984). She is coeditor of <b>Feminism in Time</b>, <b>Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law</b>, <b>Literacies in Early Modern England</b> and a critical edition of Elizabeth Cary&rsquo;s <b>Tragedy of Mariam</b>.<P><b>Mary Jo Salter</b> (M.A. Cambridge University) is Emily Dickinson Senior Lecturer in the Humanities at Mount Holyoke College, where she teaches poetry and poetry-writing. She has published several books of poems, including <b>Henry Purcell in Japan</b> (1985), <b>Unfinished Painting</b> (1989), <b>Sunday Skaters</b> (1994), <b>A Kiss in Space</b> (1999), and, most recently, <b>Open Shutters</b> (2003). A vice president of the Poetry Society of America, she has also served as poetry editor of <b>The New Republic</b>.<P><b>Jon Stallworthy</b> (M.A. and B.Litt. Oxford) is Senior Research Fellow at Wolfson College of Oxford University, where he is also Professor of English Literature. He is also the former John Wendell Anderson Professor at Cornell, where he taught after a career at Oxford University Press. His biography of Wilfred Owen won the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize, the W. H. Smith Literary Award, and the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His biography of Louis MacNeice won the Southern Arts Literary Prize. He is also the author of <b>Rounding the Horn&#58; Collected Poems</b> and <b>Singing School&#58; The Making of a Poet</b> and he is the editor of the definitive edition of Wilfred Owen&rsquo;s poetry, <b>The Complete Poems and Fragments</b>; <b>The Penguin Book of Love Poetry</b>; and <b>The Oxford Book of War Poetry</b>. Stallworthy has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and is a fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society of Literature.</p>Margaret Ferguson (Editor), Jon Stallworthy (Editor), Mary Jo Salter (Editor), Mary Jo Salter (Editor), Jon Stallworthythe-norton-anthology-of-poetry-shorter-5th-editionmargaret-ferguson97803939792130393979210$58.69PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.December 20045th EditionPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, English Poetry, English & Irish Literature Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies14249.16 (w) x 5.86 (h) x 1.50 (d)<p><b>Offering over one thousand years of verse from the medieval period to the present,</b> The Norton Anthology of Poetry is the classroom standard for the study of poetry in English.</p> <p>The Fifth Edition retains the flexibility and breadth of selection that has defined this classic anthology, while improved and expanded editorial apparatus make it an even more useful teaching tool.</p><p>Offering over one thousand years of verse from the medieval period to the present, <b>The Norton Anthology of Poetry</b> is the classroom standard for the study of poetry in English.</p>
47The Best American Poetry 2010Amy Gerstler0<p><br><b>David Lehman</b> is the editor of <I>The Oxford Book of American Poetry</i> and the author of seven books of poetry, including <I>When a Woman Loves a Man.</i> He lives in New York City.</p>Amy Gerstler (Editor), David Lehmanthe-best-american-poetry-2010amy-gerstler97814391814541439181454$13.87PaperbackSimon & Schuster Adult Publishing GroupSeptember 2010Poetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies2295.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.70 (d)<p>AMY GERSTLER’S COMMITMENT TO INNOVATIVE POETRY that conveys meaning, feeling, wit, and humor informs the cross section of poems in the 2010 edition of <i>The Best American Poetry.</i> The works collected here represent the wealth, the breadth, and the tremendous energy of poetry in the United States today. Featuring poems from some of our country’s top bards, including John Ashbery, Anne Carson, Louise Glück, Sharon Olds, and Charles Simic, <i>The Best American Poetry 2010</i> also presents poems that poignantly capture the current moment, such as the sonnets John Updike wrote to chronicle his dying weeks. And there are exciting poems from a constellation of rising stars: Bob Hicok, Terrance Hayes, Denise Duhamel, Dean Young, and Elaine Equi, to name a very few.</p> <p>The anthology’s mainstays are in place: It opens with series editor David Lehman’s incisive foreword about the state of American poetry and has a marvelous introduction by Amy Gerstler. Notes from the poets, illuminating their poems and their writing processes, conclude this delightful addition to a classic series.</p> <p>Dick Allen • John Ashbery • Sandra Beasley • Mark Bibbins • Todd Boss • Fleda Brown • Anne Carson • Tom Clark • David Clewell • Michael Collier • Billy Collins • Dennis Cooper • Kate Daniels • Peter Davis • Tim Dlugos • Denise Duhamel • Thomas Sayers Ellis • Lynn Emanuel • Elaine Equi • Jill Alexander Essbaum • B. H. Fairchild • Vievee Francis • Louise Glück • Albert Goldbarth • Amy Glynn Greacen • Sonia Greenfield • Kelle Groom • Gabriel Gudding • Kimiko Hahn • Barbara Hamby • Terrance Hayes • Bob Hicok • Rodney Jones • Michaela Kahn • Brigit Pegeen Kelly • Corinne Lee • Hailey Leithauser • Dolly Lemke • Maurice Manning • Adrian Matejka • Shane McCrae • Jeffrey McDaniel • W. S. Merwin • Sarah Murphy • Eileen Myles • Camille Norton • Alice Notley • Sharon Olds • Gregory Pardlo • Lucia Perillo • Carl Phillips • Adrienne Rich • James Richardson • J. Allyn Rosser • James Schuyler • Tim Seibles • David Shapiro • Charles Simic • Frank Stanford • Gerald Stern • Stephen Campbell Sutherland • James Tate • David Trinidad • Chase Twichell • John Updike • Derek Walcott • G. C. Waldrep • J. E. Wei • Dara Wier • Terence Winch • Catherine Wing • Mark Wunderlich • Matthew Yeager • Dean Young • Kevin Young</p><p class="null1">FOREWORD</p> <p class="null2">by David Lehman</p> <p>Over the years I’ve read novels centering on lawyers, doctors, diplomats, teachers, financiers, even car salesmen and dentists, but not until 2009 did I come across one about the travails of the editor of a poetry anthology. When word of <i>The Anthologist</i>, Nicholson Baker’s new novel, reached me last September, I couldn’t wait to read it. Baker’s novels defy convention and reveal an obsessive nature, and I wondered what he would make of American poetry, for surely his novel would reflect a strenuous engagement with the art. The title character here, Paul Chowder by unfortunate name, has put together an anthology of poems he is calling <i>Only Rhyme.</i> The phrase describes the notional book’s contents and indicates the editor’s conception of poetic virtue. Paul has chosen the contents of his anthology but is now, on the eve of a deadline, afflicted with writer’s block. He needs to write a foreword but cannot. “How many people read introductions to poetry anthologies, anyway?” he wonders, then volunteers, “I do, but I’m not normal.”</p> <p>Having asked myself that same question and given a similar answer, I can appreciate the speaker’s troubling awareness of the many poets who have to be left out of his book—and the relatively few people who will bother to read his introductory essay. The task of writing a prefatory note becomes no less difficult when it is an annual requirement, though Nicholson Baker may have made my job a little easier this time around. Every editor has the impulse to use the introductory space to open the door, welcome the guest, and disappear without further ado. But some things are worth saying, and one such is Baker’s defense of anthologies. For a poet facing all the perils that lurk in a poet’s path—a poet very like the novel’s Paul Chowder—anthologies represent the possibility of a belated second chance. And it is that possibility, however slim, that spurs the poet to stick to a vocation that offers so much resistance and promises so few rewards. The “you” in these sentences refers to the American poet—and perhaps to American poetry itself, an oddity in an age that worships celebrity. “You think: One more poem. You think: There will be some as yet ungathered anthology of American poetry. It will be the anthology that people tote around with them on subways thirty-five, forty years from now.” The poet’s conception of fame exists within modest limits, but it is persistent: “And you think: Maybe the very poem I write today will somehow pry open a space in that future anthology and maybe it will drop into position and root itself there.”</p> <p>Baker’s skeptical distance from the fray makes his take on things particularly compelling. The opinions he puts forth are provocative and entertaining. A proponent of the sit-com as the great American art form, Baker’s anthologist believes that “any random episode of <i>Friends</i> is probably better, more uplifting for the human spirit, than ninety-nine percent of the poetry or drama or fiction or history ever published.” That is quite a statement, even allowing for the complexity of irony. (After all, to be “uplifting for the human spirit” may not be the ideal criterion by which to judge poetry or history.) The speaker establishes his credentials as an American poet with his realism for self-pity’s sake. He suspects that poets form a “community” only in the realm of piety: “We all love the busy ferment, and we all know it’s nonsense. Getting together for conferences of international poetry. Hah! A joke. Reading our poems. Our little moment. Physical presence. In the same room with. A community. Forget it. It’s a joke.”</p> <p>Baker (or his mouthpiece) likes Swinburne, Poe, Millay, Elizabeth Bishop, Louise Bogan, and the contemporary British poets Wendy Cope and James Fenton. He disapproves of free verse, distrusts the “ultra-extreme enjambment” that you find in William Carlos Williams or Charles Olson, and argues that “iambic pentameter” is something of a hoax. As for the unrhymed poems that dominate literary magazines and university workshops, he feels it would be more accurate to call them “plums” and their authors “plummets” or “plummers.” How did we get to this state of affairs? In Baker’s account, the chief villain is Ezra Pound, “a blustering bigot—a humorless jokester—a talentless pasticheur—a confidence man.” Pound advocated modernism in verse with the same bullying arrogance that went into his radio broadcasts on behalf of Mussolini, and that is no accident, because the impulse that led to fascism also gave rise to modern poetry. Modernism as Pound preached it and T. S. Eliot practiced it—in <i>The Waste Land</i>, “a hodge-podge of flummery and borrowed paste”—was, in short, probably as ruinous for the art of verse as fascism was for Europe. The popularity of translations, especially prose versions of exotic foreign verse rendered from a language that the translator doesn’t know, also did its part to hasten the “death of rhyme.”</p> <p>The views articulated in <i>The Anthologist</i> are antithetical to contemporary practice in ways that recall Philip Larkin’s conviction that Pound ruined poetry, Picasso ruined painting, and Charlie Parker ruined jazz: the dissenting position, pushed to an amusing extreme, and stated with uncompromising intelligence. The narrator can sound a sour note. To teach creative writing to college students is to be “a professional teller of lies,” he maintains, gleefully quoting Elizabeth Bishop on the subject: “I think one of the worst things I know about modern education is this ‘Creative Writing’ business.” Nevertheless Baker’s opinions are worth pondering, especially when the “difficulty versus accessibility” question becomes the subject of debate. And his advice to the aspiring poet is astute. Don’t postpone writing the poem, he says. “Put it down, work on it, finish it. If you don’t get on it now, somebody else will do something similar, and when you crack open next year’s <i>Best American Poetry</i> and see it under somebody else’s name you’ll hate yourself.”</p> <p><i>The Anthologist</i> was well received and prominently reviewed in book supplements that rarely notice poetry books, let alone anthologies of them, except with a certain contempt, which was a mild irony but an old story. Some laudatory articles went so far as to declare that “you” will enjoy the work “even if you generally couldn’t care less about verse.” But then, when poetry or the teaching of poetry is discussed, commentators have a hard time avoiding a note of condescension. Poetry is called a “lost art.” It is thought to be something young people go through, a phase; something you have to apologize for, as when a poet at a reading reassures the audience that only three more poems remain on the docket. And yet poetry retains its prestige. The term exists as a sort of benchmark in fields ranging from politics to athletics. Columnists enjoy reminding newly elected officials that “you campaign in poetry but govern in prose”—an axiom that aligns poetry on the side of idealism and eloquence against the bureaucratic details and inconveniences of prosaic administration. In the <i>Financial Times</i>, the Czech photographer Miroslav Tichý, who spied on women with his homemade viewfinder, “stealing their likenesses as they giggled, gossiped and dreamed,” is described as “a peeping Tom with a poet’s eye.” Of Nancy Pelosi, readers of <i>Time</i> learned that, to the Speaker’s credit, when a colleague’s mother dies, she “encloses a poem written by her own mother with her condolence.” In the same issue of the magazine, a flattering profile of General Stanley McChrystal, commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, appeared. During the Iraq war, McChrystal sent copies of “The Second Coming” to his special operators, challenging them to flip the meaning of Yeats’s lines: “The best lack all conviction, while the worst / Are full of passionate intensity.”</p> <p>Has there ever been a really good movie about a poet as opposed to the many excellent movies in which poetry is quoted to smart effect? <i>Bright Star</i>, Jane Campion’s film about the ill-starred romance of John Keats and the barely legal Fanny Brawne, came out in 2009 and showed there is life left in the familiar stereotype of the consumptive poet burning a fever for love. Campion won over Quentin Tarantino. “The movie made me think about taking a writing class,” the director of <i>Pulp Fiction</i> said. “One of the best things that can happen from a movie about an author is that you actually want to read their work.” On television, poetry continues to put in regular appearances on <i>The PBS NewsHour</i> with Jim Lehrer and sometimes sneaks into scripted shows. When an advertising copywriter on <i>Mad Men</i> loses his job, he doesn’t take it well. He “did not go gentle into that good night,” an ex-associate observes. The critic Stephen Burt believes that <i>Project Runway</i> holds some useful lessons for poetry critics: “<i>Project Runway</i> even recalls the famous exercises in ‘practical criticism’ performed at the University of Cambridge in the 1920s, in which professor I. A. Richards asked his students to make snap judgments about unfamiliar poems.” I have commented on the inspired way that quotations from poems turn up in classic Hollywood movies, and if you’re lucky enough to catch <i>It’s Always Fair Weather</i> the next time Robert Osborne shows it on TCM, you’ll see a superb 1950s movie musical (music by André Previn, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green) that sums itself up brilliantly in three lines from <i>As You Like It</i> that enliven a conversation between Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse:</p> <p>Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly.</p> <p>Then heigh-ho, the holly!</p> <p>This life is most jolly.</p> <p>Meanwhile, you can’t pull the wool over the creative writers responsible for <i>Law and Order: Criminal Intent.</i> In a 2009 episode, a celebrated campus bard is murdered by his ex-girlfriend, who is handy with a knife. Has he been pimping out his attractive young assistants to wealthy donors? After learning how rotten the poets are to one another, the major case squad detective says that if her daughter ever says she wants to be a poet, she’d tell her to join the Mafia instead: “Nicer people.” As convalescents confined to hospital beds know, you can go wall to wall with reruns of <i>Law and Order</i>, and sure enough, the day after this episode aired I saw a rerun of <i>Law and Order: Criminal Intent</i>, in which the villain is a nerdy insurance man, an actuary with Asperger’s syndrome, whose name is Wallace Stevens. The detectives call him Wally affectionately. I spent the rest of my bedridden day with Stevens’s collected poems.</p> <p><i>Haaretz</i>, Israel’s oldest Hebrew-language daily, turned over its pages entirely to poets and novelists for one day in June 2009. The results were unsurprising in some ways (a lot of first-person point of view) but inventive and unconventional in the coverage of the stock market (“everything okay”) and the weather (a sonnet likening summer to an unsharpened pencil). The experiment reminded me of W. S. Di Piero’s assertion that the writing of good prose is the acid test of a poet’s intelligence. “Some shy from putting prose out there because it’s a giveaway,” Di Piero has written. “You can’t fake it. It reveals quality of mind, for better or worse, in a culture where poems can be faked. Find a faker and ask him or her to write anything more substantial than a jacket blurb, and the jig is up.” When we posted Di Piero’s remark on the <i>Best American Poetry</i> blog, Sally Ashton added an apt simile (a poem can be faked “like an orgasm”) and a few inevitable questions (“Who is fooled? Who benefits?”). Speaking of the <i>BAP</i> blog, there are days when it resembles nothing so much as a cross-cultural newspaper written by poets and poetry lovers. Recent visitors to the <i>BAP</i> blog could read Catharine Stimpson’s reaction to homicidal violence at the University of Alabama; Lewis Saul’s meticulously annotated commentary on thirty films by Akira Kurosawa; Jennifer Michael Hecht’s heartfelt plea to poets contemplating the suicide of Rachel Wetzsteon (“don’t kill yourself”); Laura Orem’s obituaries for Lucille Clifton, Jean Simmons, and J. D. Salinger; Katha Pollitt on Berlin in the fall; Larry Epstein on Bob Dylan; Ken Tucker on new books of poetry; Todd Swift on young British poets; Phoebe Putnam on the covers poets choose for their books; Mitch Sisskind’s “poetic tips of the day” (e.g., “Secrecy sustains the world”); Gabrielle Calvocoressi at the sports desk; Terence Winch on Irish American music; Stacey Harwood on <i>nocino</i>, the Italian liqueur made from under-ripe green walnuts; and a James Cummins epigram entitled “Anti-Confessional”: “What it was like, I don’t recall, or care to; / believe me, you should be grateful I spare you.”</p> <p><i>The Best American Poetry</i> anthology itself, now in its twenty-third year, remains committed to the idea that American poetry is as vital as it is various and that it is possible to capture the spirit of its diversity and a measure of its excellence in an annual survey of our magazines, in print or online. As the selections are made by a different editor each year, each a distinguished practitioner, the series has inevitably become an annotated chronicle of the taste of our leading poets. I persuaded Amy Gerstler to make the selections for the 2010 edition of <i>The Best American Poetry</i> because of my delight in her poems and my respect for her judgment, and it was wonderful to work with her. Amy’s new book, <i>Dearest Creature</i>, came out last year, and augmented her reputation as arguably the most inventive and ambitious poet of her generation. Gerstler can be very funny without forfeiting her right to be taken seriously; she has a quality of sincerity, of truth-telling, that can coexist with the most sophisticated of comic sensibilities. Her poems of deep feeling may take on an insouciant disguise: a letter to a cherished niece about the virtues of an encyclopedia, a conversation between a black taffeta and strapless pink dress, a riff consisting entirely of slang phrases from the not too distant past. Yet always at the heart of the poetry is an insight into the human condition and the ability to state it simply and powerfully: “Some of us grow up doing / credible impressions of model citizens / (though sooner or later hairline / cracks appear in our facades). The rest / get dubbed eccentrics, unnerved and undone / by other people’s company, for which we / nevertheless pine.” David Kirby reviewed <i>Dearest Creature</i> in <i>The New York Times Book Review.</i> “Gerstler is skilled in every kind of comedy, from slapstick to whimsy,” Kirby wrote. “Yet there’s a deep seriousness in every one of these poems, like the plaintive ‘Midlife Lullaby,’ in which the cow who is now the meatloaf in somebody’s sandwich speaks of life’s passing pleasures as hauntingly as one of those skeletons who tend to pop up in medieval allegories to remind young knights of their mortality.” Kirby concluded his review with a ringing endorsement: “In Amy Gerstler I trust.”</p> <p>The world has been slow to react to the case of Saw Wai, the imprisoned Burmese poet who was arrested two years ago for publishing a love poem for Valentine’s Day with a secret message critical of Burma’s military dictator, Than Shwe. But the story refuses to die, and the anonymously translated poem itself has now been published (in <i>Pen America</i>) and reprinted (in <i>Harper’s</i>, in February 2010). What early journalistic accounts called a “straightforward” or “innocuous” love poem turns out to be something much richer and stranger. Entitled “February 14,” Saw Wai’s poem, which appeared in the Rangoon magazine <i>The Love Journal</i>, was initially said to have been a torch song to the fashion model who rejected the poet but taught him the meaning of love. Nothing of the sort. It exemplifies rather a particular strain of modernist poetry, the leading-edge poems of the 1930s that were aped (and perfected) by the Australian hoax poet Ern Malley. The poem is an acrostic—that is, the first letters of the lines, when read down vertically, spell out a message, and in this case that message is, “General Than Shwe is power crazy.” In Burmese, Than means “million” and Shwe means “gold,” so when Saw Wai concludes his poem with the injunction “Millions of people / Who know how to love / Please clap your gilded hands / And laugh out loud,” he is secretly urging his compatriots to laugh the “power crazy” head of the junta off the stage. It took courage to write these lines. It also took an extraordinary talent for modern poetry considered as a kind of cipher, and the result in its English translation might be read as either a brief for the methods of modernism or a textbook illustration of what Nicholson Baker would have us see as the tempting dangers of the non-rhyming, prose-saturated “plum”:</p> <p>Arensberg said:<sup>1</sup></p> <p>Only once you have experienced deep pain</p> <p>And madness</p> <p>And like an adolescent</p> <p>Thought the blurred photo of a model</p> <p>Great art</p> <p>Can you call it heartbreak.</p> <p>Millions of people</p> <p>Who know how to love</p> <p>Please clap your gilded hands</p> <p>And laugh out loud.</p> <p><sup>1</sup>. Walter Conrad Arensberg, the noted art collector and donor of great paintings to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, wrote <i>The Cryptography of Shakespeare</i> (1922), purporting to find, in the Bard’s plays, anagrams and acrostics that prove Francis Bacon’s authorship. Arensberg wrote symbolist-influenced poetry, but it is conceivable that spurious cryptography is his real contribution to the radical element in modern poetry.</p> <p>© 2010 David Lehman</p><p><p>AMY GERSTLER&rsquo;S COMMITMENT TO INNOVATIVE POETRY that conveys meaning, feeling, wit, and humor informs the cross section of poems in the 2010 edition of <I>The Best American Poetry. </i>The works collected here represent the wealth, the breadth, and the tremendous energy of poetry in the United States today. Featuring poems from some of our country&rsquo;s top bards, including John Ashbery, Anne Carson, Louise Gl&Uuml;ck, Sharon Olds, and Charles Simic, <I>The Best American Poetry 2010 </i>also presents poems that poignantly capture the current moment, such as the sonnets John Updike wrote to chronicle his dying weeks. And there are exciting poems from a constellation of rising stars&#58; Bob Hicok, Terrance Hayes, Denise Duhamel, Dean Young, and Elaine Equi, to name a very few. <p>The anthology&rsquo;s mainstays are in place&#58; It opens with series editor David Lehman&rsquo;s incisive foreword about the state of American poetry and has a marvelous introduction by Amy Gerstler. Notes from the poets, illuminating their poems and their writing processes, conclude this delightful addition to a classic series.<P>Dick Allen <br>&bull; John Ashbery <br>&bull; Sandra Beasley <br>&bull; Mark Bibbins <br>&bull; Todd Boss <br>&bull; Fleda Brown <br>&bull; Anne Carson <br>&bull; Tom Clark <br>&bull; David Clewell <br>&bull; Michael Collier <br>&bull; Billy Collins <br>&bull; Dennis Cooper <br>&bull; Kate Daniels <br>&bull; Peter Davis <br>&bull; Tim Dlugos <br>&bull; Denise Duhamel <br>&bull; Thomas Sayers Ellis <br>&bull; Lynn Emanuel <br>&bull; Elaine Equi <br>&bull; Jill Alexander Essbaum <br>&bull; B. H. Fairchild <br>&bull; Vievee Francis <br>&bull; Louise Gl&Uuml;ck <br>&bull; Albert Goldbarth <br>&bull; Amy Glynn Greacen <br>&bull; Sonia Greenfield <br>&bull; Kelle Groom <br>&bull; Gabriel Gudding <br>&bull; Kimiko Hahn <br>&bull; Barbara Hamby <br>&bull; Terrance Hayes <br>&bull; Bob Hicok <br>&bull; Rodney Jones <br>&bull; Michaela Kahn <br>&bull; Brigit Pegeen Kelly <br>&bull; Corinne Lee <br>&bull; Hailey Leithauser <br>&bull; Dolly Lemke <br>&bull; Maurice Manning <br>&bull; Adrian Matejka <br>&bull; Shane McCrae <br>&bull; Jeffrey McDaniel <br>&bull; W. S. Merwin <br>&bull; Sarah Murphy <br>&bull; Eileen Myles <br>&bull; Camille Norton <br>&bull; Alice Notley <br>&bull; Sharon Olds <br>&bull; Gregory Pardlo <br>&bull; Lucia Perillo <br>&bull; Carl Phillips <br>&bull; Adrienne Rich <br>&bull; James Richardson <br>&bull; J. Allyn Rosser <br>&bull; James Schuyler <br>&bull; Tim Seibles <br>&bull; David Shapiro <br>&bull; Charles Simic <br>&bull; Frank Stanford <br>&bull; Gerald Stern <br>&bull; Stephen Campbell Sutherland <br>&bull; James Tate <br>&bull; David Trinidad <br>&bull; Chase Twichell <br>&bull; John Updike <br>&bull; Derek Walcott <br>&bull; G. C. Waldrep <br>&bull; J. E. Wei <br>&bull; Dara Wier <br>&bull; Terence Winch <br>&bull; Catherine Wing <br>&bull; Mark Wunderlich <br>&bull; Matthew Yeager <br>&bull; Dean Young <br>&bull; Kevin Young</p>
48Classic Slave Narratives: The Life of Olaudah Equiano, The History of Mary Prince, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Incidents in the Life of a Slave GirlHenry Louis Gates Jr.0<p><P></p>Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Editor), Frederick Douglass, Olaudah Equiano, Harriet Jacobs, Mary Princeclassic-slave-narrativeshenry-louis-gates-jr97804515282470451528247$1.99Mass Market PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)January 2002ReissueSlavery - Social Sciences, Slave Narratives & Biographies, Historical Figures - Women's Biography, African American Women's Biography, African American Political & Historical Biography6884.36 (w) x 7.08 (h) x 1.48 (d)<p>No group of slaves anywhere, in any era, has left such prolific testimony to the horror of bondage as African-American slaves. Here are four of the most notable narratives: <i>The Life of Olaudah Equiano; The History of Mary Prince; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass;</i> and <i>Incidents in the Life of Slave Girl</i>.</p> <p>Along with the writings of Frederick Douglas and Olaudah Equiano, this anthology includes the writings of women slaves Harriet Jacobs and Mary Prince. </p><p><P>No group of slaves anywhere, in any era, has left such prolific testimony to the horror of bondage as African-American slaves. Here are four of the most notable narratives&#58; <i>The Life of Olaudah Equiano; The History of Mary Prince; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass;</i> and <i>Incidents in the Life of Slave Girl</i>.</p><p>Introduction The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Selected Bibliography A Note on the Texts</p>
49The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2009Dave Eggers0<p><P>Dave Eggers is the editor of McSweeney's and a cofounder of 826 National, a network of nonprofit writing and tutoring centers for youth, located in seven cities across the United States. He is the author of four books, including What Is the What and How We Are Hungry.</p>Dave Eggers (Editor), Marjane Satrapithe-best-american-nonrequired-reading-2009dave-eggers97805472416090547241607$14.39PaperbackHoughton Mifflin HarcourtOctober 2009Short Story Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies4325.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)<p>This "great volume" highlights the "very best of this year's fiction, nonfiction, alternative comics, screenplys, blogs and more" (<i>OK!).</i> Compiled by Dave Eggers and students from his San Francisco writing center, it is "both uproarious and illuminating" (<i>Publishers Weekly).</i></p><p><P>This "great volume" highlights the "very best of this year's fiction, nonfiction, alternative comics, screenplys, blogs and more" (<i>OK!).</i> Compiled by Dave Eggers and students from his San Francisco writing center, it is "both uproarious and illuminating" (<i>Publishers Weekly).</i></p><article> <h4>From the Publisher</h4>"...zesty...a terrific hodgepodge of essays, satirical pieces, short fiction, lists and comics"—<i>The Cleveland Plain Dealer</i> </article>
50In Fact: The Best of Creative NonfictionLee Gutkind0<p><b>Lee Gutkind</b> is the founder and editor of the literary journal <b>Creative Nonfiction</b> and a pioneer in the field of narrative nonfiction. Writer-in-residence at Arizona State University, Gutkind is also the editor of <b>In Fact</b>, the author of <b>Almost Human</b>, and has written books about baseball, health care, travel, and technology.<P><b>Annie Dillard</b> is a noted novelist and poet.</p>Lee Gutkind (Editor), Annie Dillardin-factlee-gutkind97803933266590393326659$15.24PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.November 2004Journalism - Collections & History, American Essays, Nonfiction Writing - General & Miscellaneous, American Literature Anthologies, Journalism - General & Miscellaneous4805.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.20 (d)<p class="null1">Twenty-five arresting selections from the groundbreaking journal that defined a genre.</p> <p>Creative nonfiction, also known as narrative nonfiction, liberated journalism by inviting writers to dramatize, interpret, speculate, and even re-create their subjects. Lee Gutkind collects twenty-five essays that flourished on this new ground, all originally published in the journal he founded, <b>Creative Nonfiction</b>, now celebrating its tenth anniversary. Lauren Slater is a therapist in the institution where she was once a patient. John Edgar Wideman reacts passionately to the unjust murder of Emmett Till. Charles Simic tells of wild nights with Uncle Boris. John McPhee creates a rare, personal, album quilt. Terry Tempest Williams speaks on the decline of the prairie dog. Madison Smartt Bell invades Haiti. Many of the writers are crossing genres—from poetry and fiction to nonfiction—symbolic of <b>Creative Nonfiction's</b> scope and popularity. A cross section of the famous and those bound to become so, this collection is a riveting experience highlighting the expanding importance of this dramatic and exciting new genre.</p><p>Twenty-five arresting selections from the groundbreaking journal that defined a genre.</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction : notes for young writers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The creative nonfiction police?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Three spheres</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">3</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Looking at Emmett Till</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">24</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Shunned</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">49</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An album quilt</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">71</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dinner at Uncle Boris's</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Prayer dogs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">92</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What is it we really harvestin' here?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">109</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The brown study</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">119</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Killing wolves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">133</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Being Brians</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">163</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Language at play</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">174</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Finders keepers : the story of Joey Coyle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Notes from a difficult case</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">226</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Adventures in celestial navigation</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">245</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Leaving Babylon : a walk through the Jewish divorce ceremony</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">269</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Gray area : thinking with a damaged brain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Joe stopped by</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the woods</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">318</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sa'm Pedi</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">331</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Going native</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">356</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Chimera</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">368</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mixed-blood stew</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">382</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Why I ride</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">395</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Delivering Lily</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">419</TD></TABLE>
51The Best American Essays of the CenturyJoyce Carol Oates3<p>In a prolific and varied oeuvre that ranges over essays, plays, criticism, and several genres of fiction, Joyce Carol Oates has proved herself one of the most influential and important storytellers in the literary world.</p>Joyce Carol Oates, Robert Atwanthe-best-american-essays-of-the-centuryjoyce-carol-oates97806181558730618155872$14.84PaperbackHoughton Mifflin HarcourtOctober 2001American Essays, American Literature Anthologies6246.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)<p>This singular collection is nothing less than a political, spiritual, and intensely personal record of America’s tumultuous modern age, as experienced by our foremost critics, commentators, activists, and artists. Joyce Carol Oates has collected a group of works that are both intimate and important, essays that move from personal experience to larger significance without severing the connection between speaker and audience.<br> From Ernest Hemingway covering bullfights in Pamplona to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” these essays fit, in the words of Joyce Carol Oates, “into a kind of mobile mosaic suggest[ing] where we’ve come from, and who we are, and where we are going.” Among those whose work is included are Mark Twain, John Muir, T. S. Eliot, Richard Wright, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin, Tom Wolfe, Susan Sontag, Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, Joan Didion, Cynthia Ozick, Saul Bellow, Stephen Jay Gould, Edward Hoagland, and Annie Dillard.</p>Foreword<br> The Essay in the Twentieth Century<br> When I was very young, my father purchased a small, uniform set of <br> cheap literary classics. Why, I never knew. He was not a reader. <br> Perhaps he had been duped by a door-to-door salesman. Perhaps he had <br> aspirations for his children. The books crowded the only bookshelf in <br> a cramped two-family house hedged in by humming factories on a narrow <br> street that dead-ended into the mysterious and spectacular sumac-<br> lined banks of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey. As a result <br> of his once-in-a-lifetime purchase I grew up with the privilege of <br> knowing that Emerson was not merely the name of a television set.<br> <br> I found Emerson's message bracing and liberating. I can see <br> it now as self-help elevated to the highest literary standard, but <br> reading "Self-Reliance" as an adolescent I simply took heart from his <br> exhortations to resist conformity, trust in oneself, and not feel <br> pressured by conventions, parties, and authority: "I am ashamed to <br> think how easily we capitulate to badges and names, to large <br> societies and dead institutions," he said. "If I know your sect, I <br> anticipate your argument," he said. "Insist on yourself; never <br> imitate," he said. He warned about the physical pain of forced smiles <br> and acknowledged the advantages of being misunderstood. If the <br> writings of the medieval Jewish philosopher Maimonides comprised a <br> Guide for the Perplexed, Emerson's essays provided a Guide for the <br> Intimidated. His independent, freethinking, inquisitive mind shaped <br> American thought and writing, and his spiritual heirsinvented the <br> twentieth-century essay.<br> Although Emerson may be said to hover over the volume, his <br> presence can be detected more directly in one of his most prominent <br> descendants, William James. Although this selection of great American <br> essays begins in 1901, one could argue that the symbolic origins of <br> the twentieth-century essay go back to the day in 1842 when Emerson <br> was invited by the James family to visit their New York apartment <br> and "bless" young William in his cradle. As a teacher, lecturer, <br> physician, scientist, and one of the founders of modern psychology, <br> William James would exert a powerful influence over the new century. <br> Two of his students, W.E.B. Du Bois and Gertrude Stein, would <br> permanently alter the course of the American essay by initiating two <br> new modes of literary introspection: Du Bois's "double-consciousness" <br> grounded in racial identity and Stein's experiments with "stream of <br> consciousness." Both originated in the critical first decade of the <br> century, and their literary legacies can be felt throughout this <br> collection.<br> The twentieth-century essay also emerged from a resistance to <br> the "familiar" or "polite" essay that had been a literary staple of <br> the preceding era. Proper, congenial, Anglophilic, the genteel essay <br> survived, even against the skepticism and irascibility of the Mark <br> Twains, Randolph Bournes, and H. L. Menckens, who did their best to <br> bury it. By the 1930s, however, some writers were lamenting its <br> demise, and in the most curious metaphors. "The familiar essay, that <br> lavender-scented little old lady of literature, has passed away," one <br> wrote, regretting that magazines now filled their pages with "crisp <br> articles, blatant exposés, or statistic-laden surveys," and <br> concluding that one day "her pale ghost will not appear at all, and <br> the hard young sociologists can have her pages all to themselves." <br> But the "pale ghost" did not vanish all at once. It lived on in <br> college courses and gave the essay a bad name for decades. The goal <br> of English teachers, the novelist Kurt Vonnegut recalls, was to get <br> you "to write like cultivated Englishmen of a century or more ago."<br> This collection features none of those "lavender-scented" <br> essays, not even for historical reasons. Our object was not to <br> construct a Museum of the American Essay. Although some vestiges <br> of "gentility" or essayistic "leisure" may have seeped in here and <br> there, the ruling idea behind the volume was that the essays should <br> speak to the present, not merely represent the past. So you will find <br> more "hard young sociologists" here than "cultivated" literati. After <br> all, some of those young social scientists were Jane Addams, Zora <br> Neale Hurston, and a youthful Saul Bellow, who happened to be <br> studying sociology and anthropology at Northwestern at precisely the <br> same time the genteel essayists were lamenting their own demise. The <br> sociologists, accompanied by such self-taught social critics as <br> Edmund Wilson, Richard Wright, and James Agee, brought the essay out <br> of the library and into the American factories, city streets, <br> courthouses, and tenant farms. For many of them, ardent pacifists and <br> reformers, writing essays would amount to what James called "the <br> moral equivalent of war."<br> Unlike their predecessors, twentieth-century essayists were <br> eager to confront inner as well as outer strife. To be sure, the <br> genteel essay was personal, but no matter how "familiar," it always <br> politely stopped short of full disclosure. Here, too, William James <br> made his presence felt. The brilliant chapters "The Divided Self" <br> and "The Sick Soul" in his monumental The Varieties of Religious <br> Experience (1902) would become a valuable resource for essayists <br> seeking ways to articulate despair, breakdowns, aberrant states of <br> consciousness, psychic confusion, the ineffable in general. F. Scott <br> Fitzgerald's famous observation in "The Crack-Up" - "The test of a <br> first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in <br> the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function" -<br> laid out a course for future essayists and expanded the <br> possibilities of self-disclosure. As writers began amplifying the <br> personal essay into what is now known singularly as "the memoir," the <br> processes of confession would know no limits.<br> What next? Will this new century reject our "best" essays as <br> dramatically as the twentieth discarded those of James Russell Lowell <br> and Oliver Wendell Holmes? The 1890s, too, saw astonishing changes in <br> technology, rapid changes that frightened Henry Adams as he wondered <br> what the "Law of Acceleration" would finally lead to. We have reached <br> his speculative end point - visionary though he was, he never <br> imagined a world transformed by electronics. The Internet is already <br> generating new sources of essays. Will it somehow channel the usual <br> processes of prose into new literary forms the way some thought the <br> typewriter had once done? Will young essayists discover audiences <br> without having to sweat through the hundreds of rejection slips James <br> Thurber received before he could break into print? And will they do <br> what few from any century have ever done: make a living writing <br> essays? These remain to be seen, but what I think we can say for <br> certain is that whatever new forms the essay takes, if they are <br> wonderful, they will have the blessing of William James and his <br> legitimate heirs.<br> <br> About This Collection<br> This volume is not a "best of the best." I founded The Best American <br> Essays series in 1986, and therefore Joyce Carol Oates and I had only <br> a small slice of the century to provide us with essays that had <br> already achieved an annual "best" status. Only seven of the essays in <br> this volume come from the series. We wish we could have included many <br> more of the superb contemporary writers who have contributed to the <br> yearly books, but it was of course not possible. Our consolation is <br> that their work is still accessible to readers and that the annual <br> books are for the most part available in libraries and bookstores. It <br> was important that we include writers from previous generations who <br> may not be well known to today's readers and who in our opinion still <br> very much deserve an audience.<br> I proceeded with this book in much the same way that I have <br> with the annual volumes. I screened a good number of essays - though <br> far, far more than usual - and turned them over to Joyce Carol Oates <br> for a final decision. There were hundreds of essays to consider and <br> so little space. But we winnowed and winnowed and arrived at these <br> fifty-five. We tried to include the best of as many different kinds <br> of essay as possible - personal, critical, philosophical, humorous, <br> pastoral, autobiographical, scientific, documentary, political. <br> Obviously we had to pull back in many cases. A comparable volume <br> could be assembled to showcase each one of these categories. I also <br> exercised one final choice: I insisted that Oates's essay from The <br> Best American Essays 1996, "They All Just Went Away," be included.<br> "Essays end up in books," Susan Sontag writes, "but they <br> start their lives in magazines." That fact may not interest many <br> readers, but it played a large role in the research for this book, <br> since between an essay's debut in a periodical and its inclusion in a <br> collection, a good deal of revision often occurs. Vladimir Nabokov's <br> memoir of his father, for example, went through three very distinct <br> publishing stages. It began life as "The Perfect Past" in The New <br> Yorker in 1950, but Nabokov, dissatisfied with some of the editing, <br> returned to his original typescript when he included (and expanded) <br> it as the opening chapter of his 1951 autobiography, Conclusive <br> Evidence. When he revised that book as Speak, Memory: An <br> Autobiography Revisited in 1966, he expanded the essay yet again. Of <br> the three published versions, we chose - as we did with many of the <br> selections - to reprint the final version, as it would reflect and <br> respect the author's final decisions. But in some instances <br> (consistency "is the hobgoblin of little minds," Emerson said), we <br> selected the first or a different published version.<br> Some essays start out looking like essays only to reemerge in <br> unexpected contexts. James Agee's lovely childhood <br> reminiscence, "Knoxville: Summer of 1915," started out in Partisan <br> Review in 1938 but was given a new twist when an editor cleverly <br> borrowed and italicized it in 1957 to serve as the introduction to <br> Agee's posthumously published novel, A Death in the Family. Other <br> essays in this book were also put to service by their authors to <br> introduce works of fiction: Richard Wright's "The Ethics of Living <br> Jim Crow" became the preface to his collection of stories Uncle Tom's <br> Children, and N. Scott Momaday's "The Way to Rainy Mountain" now <br> serves as the prologue to his popular novel of the same title.<br> I discovered that there is rarely only one version of an <br> essay. Susan Sontag's useful observation sometimes gets reversed: an <br> essay starts out in book form and ends up in a magazine. Several <br> essays in this volume were skillfully carved out of books and re-<br> created either by their authors or a magazine's editors as <br> independent essays. Usually, what's required is the removal of the <br> interstitial glue that connects a book's separate chapters. For <br> example, the opening sections of Maya Angelou's 1970 memoir, I Know <br> Why the Caged Bird Sings, were transformed into a memorable childhood <br> reminiscence of the same title in Harper's Magazine.<br> Because essays may go through so many publishing variations, <br> settling on a precise date for each selection was no easy matter. I <br> proceeded largely case by case. Nabokov's 1966 essay on his father <br> was so transformed from its 1950 origins that it seemed only <br> reasonable to use the later date. So, too, I decided to use the final <br> publication date for John Muir's Alaskan adventures with his <br> unforgettable companion Stickeen; it was that version, and not the <br> earlier and now forgotten essay, that became his most popular work. <br> But occasionally I thought it would be misleading to use the final <br> date of publication. Langston Hughes's "Bop," for example, clearly <br> comes out of the forties; though it was revised considerably for <br> subsequent book publication, to place it in a later decade would <br> distort its contemporary flavor. An essay like Mark Twain's "Corn-<br> pone Opinions," never published in the author's lifetime, is listed <br> by date of composition.<br> For the reader's convenience, I have attached brief notes to <br> each essay outlining its publishing history and supplying relevant <br> contextual information. I have placed an asterisk before the source <br> used for this collection. I have also translated foreign words and <br> phrases within brackets when it seemed necessary. Additional <br> information is contained in the Biographical Notes in the back of the <br> book, where I included pertinent information on the writer's career, <br> relevant details to establish a context for the selected essay, and <br> titles of books and collections (with the emphasis on nonfiction) <br> that will direct interested readers to more books by that writer.<br> Writers and magazine editors interested in submitting <br> published essays for the annual volumes should send complimentary <br> issues, subscriptions, or appropriate material to Robert Atwan, <br> Series Editor, The Best American Essays, Box 220, Readville, <br> Massachusetts 02137-9998. Criteria and guidelines can be found in the <br> annual book.<br> Acknowledgments<br> As I researched books and periodicals for this unprecedented volume, <br> I often felt like Henry Adams, poised at the crossroads of two time <br> periods: the rapidly accelerating age of cyberspace that instantly <br> furnishes vast amounts of information and the old-fashioned era of <br> dim library stacks and dusty, out-of-print books. The experience was <br> both high-tech and low-tech. If it was satisfying to sit at my desk <br> and click a few keys for immediate access to material that only a few <br> years ago would have required frequent library visits, it was even <br> more satisfying to hold in my hand hardcover first editions of books <br> like Martin Luther King's Why We Can't Wait or H. L. Mencken's <br> Prejudices. Even obtaining these books involved travel in both <br> worlds: through the Internet I could enter my local library's <br> regional network, discover books it didn't own, and conveniently <br> order them online. A day or two later - and sometimes within hours - <br> I would be experiencing the tactile and intellectual pleasures of <br> handling some of the treasured pieces of our literary heritage. For <br> their invaluable assistance, then, I want to thank especially the <br> staff of the Milton Public Library as well as all the other <br> institutions connected with the Old Colony Library Network in <br> Massachusetts.<br> What I was unable to find, my researcher could. Much of the <br> knottier research - establishing the original source or date of an <br> essay, or tracking down an elusive periodical - was performed by <br> Donna Ashley, who relied on the superb resources of the libraries at <br> the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University, Boston <br> College, and the Boston Public Library. Nearly all of the source <br> notes attached to each essay derive from her dogged research; without <br> her assistance this project might have taken another year to <br> complete. I want to thank, too, Arthur Johnson for his generous help <br> in providing permissions data for all of the essays. I borrowed a <br> good deal of biographical information about the essayists from some <br> of my previous anthologies and would like to thank a few coeditors <br> for their contributions: Martha Banta, Bruce Forer, Justin Kaplan, <br> Donald McQuade, David Minter, Jon Roberts, Robert Stepto, and William <br> Vesterman. I'm enormously grateful to Charles H. Christensen for his <br> advice and encouragement over the years. The Houghton Mifflin staff <br> has been helpful and supportive as always, and I'd like to thank <br> Janet Silver, Sean Lawler, Larry Cooper, Bridget Marmion, Dean <br> Johnson, and Bruce Cantley for all their efforts. My wife, Hélène <br> Atwan, kindly read over portions of the manuscript and offered many <br> valuable suggestions for which I am very grateful. Finally, it was a <br> great pleasure to work once again with Joyce Carol Oates. Her broad <br> knowledge of American writing and her literary judgment transformed <br> what seemed like a paralyzing critical task - reducing several <br> hundred great essays to a mere fifty-five - into a spirited, <br> illuminating assessment of the modern American essayist's struggle to <br> encompass the creative energies and social emergencies of a century <br> that had no shortage of either.<br> Robert Atwan <br> <br> Introduction<br> The Art of the (American) Essay<br> Here is a history of America told in many voices.<br> It's an elliptical tale, or a compendium of tales, of the <br> American twentieth century by way of individual essays that, fitting <br> together into a kind of mobile mosaic, suggest where we've come from, <br> and who we are, and where we are going. In his probing, <br> provocative "The Creation Myth of Cooperstown," Stephen Jay Gould <br> asks: "Why do we prefer creation myths to evolutionary stories?" The <br> more we know of history, of both the natural and the civilized <br> worlds, the more we understand that our tangled lives are ever <br> evolving, and that our culture, far from being timeless, is a living <br> expression of Time.<br> The essay, in its directness and intimacy, in its first-<br> person authority, is the ideal literary form to convey such a vision. <br> By tradition essays have been categorized as formal or informal; yet <br> it can be argued that all essays are an expression of the human voice <br> addressing an imagined audience, seeking to shift opinion, to <br> influence judgment, to appeal to another in his or her common <br> humanity. Even the most artfully composed essay suggests a <br> naturalness of discourse. As our precursor Montaigne advised, "We <br> must remove the mask."<br> The essays in this volume have all been written by writers <br> who have published at least one collection of essays or nonfiction. <br> Not only did this principle allow the editors a reasonable means of <br> limiting selections, it is an acknowledgment that writing is a <br> vocation, not merely an avocation. In a historical overview of a <br> century virtually teeming with talent, I wanted to honor those <br> writers who have made writing their life's work. I didn't see my role <br> as one to reward the lucky amateur who writes a single good essay, <br> then disappears forever. Better to search for little-known but <br> excellent essays by, for instance, writers of historical significance <br> like John Jay Chapman, Jane Addams, Edmund Wilson. Most of the essays <br> are "informal"; but this isn't to suggest that they are innocent, <br> unmediated utterances lacking the stratagems of art. Even Mark <br> Twain's "Corn-pone Opinions," delivered in the author's <br> characteristic forthright voice, is driven by a passionate <br> intellectual conviction regarding the gullibility of mankind and the <br> tragic consequences of this gullibility.<br> My general theme in the assemblage of this volume has been a <br> search for the expression of personal experience within the <br> historical, the individual talent within the tradition (to paraphrase <br> T. S. Eliot). My preference was always to essays that, springing from <br> intense personal experience, are nonetheless significantly linked to <br> larger issues, even if, as in the case of James Thurber and S. J. <br> Perelman, these issues are viewed playfully. The emotion I felt when <br> beginning to read most of the essays gathered here was one of great <br> excitement and anticipation; even, at times, a distinct visceral <br> thrill. As an editor, I am primarily a reader. I could not <br> countenance including essays out of duty's sake that, in fact, I <br> found deadly dull. For the many essays considered for this volume, <br> the majority of which ultimately had to be excluded, I was the ideal <br> reader: I wanted to like what I read, and I was committed to reading <br> the entire essay with sympathy. If you will substitute "literature" <br> for "poetry" in this famous remark in a letter of Emily Dickinson's, <br> you have my basic criterion for the work included in The Best <br> American Essays of the Century: "If I read a book [and] it makes my <br> whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me I know that is poetry. If <br> I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know <br> that is poetry."<br> And what powerful openings in certain of these exemplary <br> essays:<br> We are met to commemorate the anniversary of one of the most terrible <br> crimes in history - not for the purpose of condemning it, but to <br> repent of our share in it.<br> - John Jay Chapman, "Coatesville" (1912)<br> The knowledge of the existence of Devil Baby burst upon the residents <br> of Hull House one day when three Italian women, with an excited rush <br> through the door, demanded that he be shown to them.<br> - Jane Addams, "The Devil Baby at Hull-House" (1916)<br> Of course all life is a process of breaking down, but the blows that <br> do the dramatic side of the work - the big sudden blows that come, or <br> seem to come, from outside - the ones you remember and blame things <br> on and, in moments of weakness, tell your friends about, don't show <br> their effect all at once. There is another sort of blow that comes <br> from within - that you don't feel until it's too late to do anything <br> about it, until you realize with finality that in some regard you <br> will never be as good a man again.<br> - F. Scott Fitzgerald, "The Crack-Up" (1936)<br> The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our <br> existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of <br> darkness.<br> - Vladimir Nabokov, "Perfect Past" (1950)<br> On the twenty-ninth of July, in 1943, my father died. On the same <br> day, a few hours later, his last child was born. Over a month before <br> this, while all our energies were concentrated in waiting for these <br> events, there had been, in Detroit, one of the bloodiest race riots <br> of the century.<br> - James Baldwin, "Notes of a Native Son" (1955)<br> The decaying, downtown shopping section of Memphis - still another <br> Main Street - lay, the weekend before Martin Luther King's funeral, <br> under a siege.<br> - Elizabeth Hardwick, "The Apotheosis of Martin Luther King" (1968)<br> We were all strapped into the seats of the Chinook, fifty of us, and <br> something, someone was hitting it from the outside with an enormous <br> hammer. How do they do that? I thought, we're a thousand feet in the <br> air!<br> - Michael Herr, "Illumination Rounds" (1977)<br> We tell ourselves stories in order to live.<br> - Joan Didion, "The White Album" (1978)<br> Of course there are crucial distinctions between the art of <br> the essay and the art of prose fiction, yet to the reader the <br> immediate experience in reading is an engagement with that mysterious <br> presence we call voice. Reading, we "hear" another's speech <br> replicated in our heads as if by magic. Where in life we sometimes <br> (allegedly infrequently) fall in love at first sight, in reading we <br> may fall in love with the special, singular qualities of another's <br> voice; we may become mesmerized, haunted; we may be provoked, <br> shocked, illuminated; we may be galvanized into action; we may be <br> enraged, revulsed, and yet! - drawn irresistibly to experience this <br> voice again, and again. It's a writer's unique employment of language <br> to which we, as readers, are drawn, though we assume we admire the <br> writer primarily for what he or she "has to say." For consider: how <br> many intelligent, earnest, right-minded commentators published essays <br> on such important subjects as racial conflict in twentieth-century <br> America, social and personal disintegration in the thirties, <br> morality, democracy, nostalgia-for-a-vanishing-America; class <br> struggle, civil rights, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Vietnam War, the <br> mystical experience of nature, ethnic diversity, various <br> American "myths" - and how few of these are worth rereading, let <br> alone enshrining, in this new century. To be an editor in so massive <br> an undertaking, committed to reading with sympathy countless essays <br> of high worth and distinction published in the most prestigious <br> journals of their era, beginning in about 1900 and sweeping through <br> the decades, is to experience first-hand that quickening of dread, <br> which Nabokov calls mere "common sense," in the realization of human <br> mortality. So many meritorious voices, so much evidence of American <br> good will and wisdom, and so many fallen by the wayside! There were <br> times when I felt as if I were indeed standing at the edge of an <br> abyss, entrusted with rescuing pages of impeccable prose being blown <br> past me into oblivion, preserving what I could, surrendering all the <br> rest. (Those excellent essayists of a bygone time John Muir, Randolph <br> Bourne, and John Jay Chapman are preserved here; surrendered to the <br> exigencies of space limitations are John Burroughs, George Santayana, <br> Joseph Wood Krutch, Ellen Glasgow, and others listed in the Appendix.)<br> My belief is that art should not be comforting; for comfort, <br> we have mass entertainment, and one another. Art should provoke, <br> disturb, arouse our emotions, expand our sympathies in directions we <br> may not anticipate and may not even wish. Art should certainly aspire <br> to beauty, but there are myriad sorts of beauty: the presentation of <br> a subject in the most economical way, for instance; a precise choice <br> of language, of detail. There is beauty in the calibrated ugliness of <br> the opening of William Gass's meditation on suicide and art, "The <br> Doomed in Their Sinking," because it is so finely calibrated; there <br> is beauty in the eloquent, elegiac expression of hurt, rage, and <br> despair in James Baldwin's "Notes of a Native Son," because it is <br> eloquent and elegiac, in the service of art. That staple of <br> traditional essay collections, the unhurried musings of a disembodied <br> (Caucasian, male, privileged) consciousness, is missing here, except <br> for its highest, most lyric expression in E. B. White's classic "Once <br> More to the Lake" and its total transmogrification in Edward <br> Hoagland's powerful "Heaven and Nature" - which is about neither <br> heaven nor nature. (Hoagland, one of the few American writers who has <br> forged a brilliant career out of essays, is our Chopin of the genre. <br> Though best known for such nature essays as "The Courage of <br> Turtles," "Red Wolves and Black Bears," and "Earth's Eye," in the <br> tradition of Thoreau, Hoagland is equally memorable as a recorder of <br> startling, confessional utterances of a kind the very private Thoreau <br> would not have dared.) Though there are deeply moving essays in the <br> nostalgic/musing mode by such fine writers as White, James Agee, <br> Eudora Welty, and John Updike, I have given more space to what might <br> be called a radical expansion of this familiar genre, essays that <br> have the power of personal nostalgia yet are not sentimental, and in <br> which private contemplation touches on crucial public issues, as Zora <br> Neale Hurston's "How It Feels to Be Colored Me," Richard <br> Wright's "The Ethics of Living Jim Crow," Baldwin's "Notes of a <br> Native Son," Loren Eiseley's "The Brown Wasps," N. Scott <br> Momaday's "The Way to Rainy Mountain," Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the <br> Caged Bird Sings," Richard Rodriguez's "Aria: A Memoir of a Bilingual <br> Childhood," and others. If you begin Edmund Wilson's "The Old Stone <br> House" presuming it to be another nostalgic lament for a vanishing <br> America, you will be shocked by the author's conclusion:<br> And what about me? As I come back in the train, I find that - other <br> causes contributing - my depression of Talcottville deepens. I did <br> not find the river and the forest of my dream - I did not find the <br> magic of the past . . . I would not go back to that old life if I <br> could: the civilization of northern New York - why should I idealize <br> it? - was too lonely, too poor, too provincial.<br> Similarly, Donald Hall's "A Hundred Thousand Straightened Nails" is <br> both a sympathetic portrait of an older relative of the writer's and <br> a devastating critique of the romance of American rural eccentricity, <br> the stock material of how many homespun reminiscences in the Norman <br> Rockwell mode:<br> [Washington Woodward] worked hard all his life at being himself, but <br> there were no principles to examine when his life was over . . . The <br> life that he could recall totally was not worth recalling; it was a <br> box of string too short to be saved.<br> Apart from being first-rate reportage, Joan Didion's "The White <br> Album" can be seen as a radical variant of the genre of nostalgia as <br> well, in which the essayist positions her intimate, interior life <br> ("an attack of vertigo and nausea does not seem to me an <br> inappropriate response to the summer of 1968") within the larger, <br> wayward, and "poorly comprehended" life of our culture circa 1966-<br> 1978, with the defiant conclusion "writing [this] has not yet helped <br> me to see what it means": the antithesis of the traditional essay, <br> which was organized around a principle, or epiphany, toward which it <br> confidently moved. So too Michael Herr's "Illumination Rounds," from <br> Dispatches, is appropriately ironically titled, for little is finally <br> illuminated in this account of a young American journalist's visit to <br> Vietnam in the mid-seventies, at the height of that protracted and <br> tragic war; the techniques of vividly cinematic fiction writing are <br> here employed in the service of the author's vision, but there is, <br> conspicuously, no "moral" - no "moralizing." This is the art of the <br> contemporary essay, or memoir: a heightened, trompe l'oeil attention <br> to detail that allows the reader to see, hear, witness, as if at <br> first hand, what the essayist has witnessed. Though this <br> is "informal" writing, there is no lack of form. Postmodernist <br> strategies of fragmentation and collage have replaced that of <br> exposition, summary, and argument.<br> <br> For all their diversity, essays tend to fall into three general <br> types: those that present opinions primarily, and have been written <br> to "instruct"; those that impart information and knowledge; and those <br> that record personal impressionistic experiences, especially <br> memories. These categories often overlap, of course, as in the <br> outstanding essays named above, and in recent years, judging from the <br> annual series The Best American Essays, from which essays in this <br> volume published since 1985 have been taken, the genre has evolved <br> into a form closely akin to prose fiction and prose poetry, employing <br> dialogue, dramatic scenes, withheld information, suspense.<br> The essay of opinion, of which Montaigne (1533-1592) was an <br> early, highly influential master, was for centuries the <br> quintessential essay. Here, you find no dialogue or dramatic scenes, <br> only a rational, reasoning voice. Such an essay is an argument, often <br> couched in conversational terms; its intention is to instruct, to <br> illuminate, to influence. Except for editorial and op-ed pages of <br> newspapers, in which they appear in miniature form, and in a very few <br> general-interest magazines like Harper's and the Atlantic, such <br> essays are not much favored today. In our egalitarian culture we tend <br> to feel, rightly or wrongly, that an essayist's opinion is only as <br> good as his or her expertise, and in such uncharted areas as ethics, <br> morals, and general wisdom, whose opinion should be taken more <br> seriously than anyone else's? In the past, however, the gentlemanly <br> art of opinion-offering was commonplace; Ralph Waldo Emerson is the <br> North American master of this form. With the publication of "Nature" <br> in 1836, Emerson's prestige and influence through the whole of the <br> nineteenth century was incalculable. Here was a brilliant aphoristic-<br> philosophical mind expressed in an elegantly idiosyncratic language. <br> Henry David Thoreau, Emerson's younger contemporary, combines strong <br> opinions with a wealth of observed information and firsthand <br> experience in a crystalline, poetic prose, and for this reason seems <br> to us more modern, and far more accessible, than Emerson. There is a <br> rich subcategory of American essays, the confrontation of nature by a <br> refined, fastidiously observing consciousness, that has descended to <br> us from Thoreau; I would have dearly liked to include more <br> practitioners of this sort but had room for only John Muir, Rachel <br> Carson, Loren Eiseley, Annie Dillard, and Gretel Ehrlich. (But all <br> these essays are gems.) In general, our patience tends to wear thin <br> when we're confronted with sermonizing in its many forms; I most <br> often encountered such essays among those published in the first four <br> or five decades of the century, when magazines seemed to have <br> unlimited space for rambling, genial prose by men with nothing <br> especially urgent on their minds apart from platitudes of nature and <br> morality. Who were the readers of these essays, I wondered. The more <br> elusive the subject, the more verbose the style, as in two <br> fascinating masterpieces of ellipsis, indirection, and irresolution <br> by Henry James at his most baroque, "Is There a Life after Death?" <br> (1910) and "Within the Rim" (1915). ("Is There a Life after Death?" <br> was initially included in this volume, and then reluctantly excluded; <br> then included again, and finally excluded. A longtime admirer of <br> Henry James, I wanted badly for him to be represented, but the essay <br> is, one might say, "Jamesian," and long, and could hardly be <br> justified as among the best of the century. And "Within the Rim," on <br> the apparent theme of war, is even more abstruse.)<br> Yet for all their unfashionableness, the opinion essays <br> included here are, I think, excellent, and will repay the sort of <br> close, sympathetic reading required for prose that isn't immediately <br> gripping and specific. Henry Adams's "A Law of Acceleration," from <br> the classic The Education of Henry Adams, is a bravura work of <br> astonishing intellectual abstraction; written nearly one hundred <br> years ago, it strikes a disturbingly contemporary note in its somber <br> contemplation of a mechanistic universe reduced to a series <br> of "relations" and mankind itself reduced to "Motion in a universe of <br> Motions, with an acceleration . . . of vertiginous violence." With <br> the authority of science, Adams says, history has no right to meddle, <br> since science "now lay in a plane where scarcely one or two hundred <br> minds in the world could follow its mathematical processes." <br> Fittingly, William James's famous "The Moral Equivalent of War" was <br> written in the same year, 1910, as Henry James's "Is There a Life <br> after Death?" Though William James is a far more lucid prose stylist <br> than his younger brother, both brothers are concerned with profound <br> questions of life and death; William James broods upon the future of <br> civilization itself in a prophetic work that looks ahead to Freud's <br> late, melancholic Civilization and Its Discontents (1930). What is <br> history but a bloodbath? "The horrors make the fascination. War is <br> the strong life; it is life in extremis; war-taxes are the only ones <br> men never hesitate to pay, as the budgets of all nations show us." <br> John Jay Chapman, once considered an essayist of nearly Emerson's <br> stature, is not much read today, yet his passionate meditation upon a <br> notorious lynching that took place in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in <br> 1911 transcends its time and tragic circumstances.<br> The two most influential literary essays of the twentieth <br> century are perhaps T. S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual <br> Talent" ("The emotion of art is impersonal") and Robert Frost's "The <br> Figure a Poem Makes" ("No tears in the writer, no tears in the <br> reader"); each gains from being read in conjunction with the other. <br> Sui generis is Gertrude Stein's "What Are Master-pieces and Why Are <br> There So Few of Them," itself a masterpiece of polemics, an argument <br> that convinces by sheer repetition:<br> . . . One has not identity [when] one is in the act of doing <br> anything. Identity is recognition, you know who you are because you <br> and others remember anything about yourself but essentially you are <br> not that when you are doing anything. I am I because my little dog <br> knows me but, creatively speaking the little dog knowing that you are <br> you and your recognizing that he knows, is what destroys creation.<br> H. L. Mencken's "The Hills of Zion" is, like many of <br> Mencken's essays and columns, a passionate repudiation of evangelical <br> Christianity and anti-intellectualism. This is sermonizing disguised <br> as social satire, zestful in its accumulation of damning details; one <br> can see why the young Negro Richard Wright was so impressed by <br> Mencken's example, seeing the older white man as "fighting, fighting <br> with words . . . using words as a weapon . . . as one would use a <br> club." Katherine Anne Porter's "The Future Is Now" is an almost <br> purely cerebral opinion piece, less compelling perhaps than Porter's <br> elegantly composed short stories, but gracefully argued nonetheless, <br> while "Artists in Uniform," one of Mary McCarthy's most anthologized <br> essays, smoothly combines her satirical gifts with her passion for <br> intellectual discourse. Susan Sontag's "Notes on Camp" is both <br> opinion essay and cultural criticism of a high order; Adrienne Rich's <br> dramatically fragmented "Women and Honor: Some Notes on Lying" might <br> be defined as an essay of opinion in a unique, poetic form. Essays by <br> Alice Walker, Richard Rodriguez, N. Scott Momaday, and Cynthia Ozick <br> advance arguments by means of an accumulation of memoirist detail, <br> and each presents us with the wonder of how, in Ozick's words, "a <br> writer is dreamed and transfigured into being." And essays that seem <br> to be primarily concerned with the imparting of information and <br> description, like Loren Eiseley's "The Brown Wasps," Tom <br> Wolfe's "Putting Daddy On," Elizabeth Hardwick's "The Apotheosis of <br> Martin Luther King," Lewis Thomas's "The Lives of a Cell," Annie <br> Dillard's "Total Eclipse," among others, contain arguments of <br> subtlety and insight. Saul Bellow's "Graven Images" is a meditation <br> in the author's characteristic ironic mode on photography as a <br> violation of personal dignity and privacy and the "revolutionary <br> transformation" of a world that no longer honors such values. John <br> McPhee's wonderfully original "The Search for Marvin Gardens" makes <br> of the popular American board game an allegory of capitalist <br> adventure, and rewards us with the unexpected discovery of the <br> secluded middle-class bastion Marvin Gardens, the security-<br> patrolled "suburb within a suburb" that is one's reward for winning <br> the game.<br> The earliest essay in the anthology, Mark Twain's "Corn-pone <br> Opinions," is a superbly modulated argument that begins with an <br> engaging portrait of a young black slave (this is the Missouri of <br> Twain's childhood, in the 1850s) and proceeds to a ringing <br> denunciation of cultural chauvinism that is as relevant to our time <br> as it was to Twain's:<br> Broadly speaking, there are none but corn-pone opinions. And broadly <br> speaking, corn-pone stands for self-approval. Self-approval is <br> acquired mainly from the approval of other people. The result is <br> conformity.<br> By which Twain means that deathly conformity that leads to an <br> acceptance of slavery, lynchings, white bigotry, and injustice in a <br> nation constituted as a democracy.<br> Twain's essay strikes a chord that resounds through the <br> anthology: the ever-shifting, ever-evolving issue of race in America. <br> It can't be an accident that the essays in this volume by men and <br> women of ethnic minority backgrounds are outstanding; to paraphrase <br> Melville, to write a "mighty" work of prose you must have a "mighty" <br> theme. And what mightier, what more challenging and passionate theme <br> for both writer and reader than how it feels to be of minority status <br> in America, from the time of W.E.B. Du Bois in the first decade of <br> the century to our contemporaries Maya Angelou, N. Scott Momaday, <br> Maxine Hong Kingston, Alice Walker, Richard Rodriguez, and Gerald <br> Early? For historical reasons obviously having to do with slavery, <br> the experience of blacks in America has been significantly different <br> from that of other minorities, and this fact is reflected in the <br> essays included here.<br> W.E.B. Du Bois's "Of the Coming of John," from The Souls of <br> Black Folk (1903), is a chillingly prophetic work that traces the <br> intellectual and spiritual evolution of a seemingly ordinary black <br> boy from southeastern Georgia who is sent north to be educated in a <br> Negro school, returns after seven years to his hometown so thoroughly <br> changed that he seems more foreign to his former relatives and <br> neighbors than a Georgian white man would be, and is given advice by <br> the kindly white Judge:<br> ". . . You and I both know, John, that in this country the Negro must <br> remain subordinate, and can never expect to be the equal of white <br> men. In their place, you people can be honest and respectful; and God <br> knows, I'll do what I can to help them. But when they want to reverse <br> nature . . . by God! we'll hold them under if we have to lynch every <br> Nigger in the land."<br> Zora Neale Hurston in "How It Feels to Be Colored Me" (1928) defines <br> herself very differently from Du Bois's tragic protagonist, partly <br> because she has been raised in a "colored town" in Florida, <br> Eatonville. Her defiance strikes us as courageous, and touching:<br> At certain times I have no race, I am me . . . Sometimes, I feel <br> discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely <br> astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my <br> company! It's beyond me.<br> Richard Wright's "The Ethics of Living Jim Crow: An Autobiographical <br> Sketch," the preface to Wright's 1938 collection of novellas, Uncle <br> Tom's Children, would become a section of his heralded Black Boy <br> (1945). Wright's education in Jim Crow "wisdom" begins ironically <br> with a beating his mother gives him for having dared to fight with <br> white boys, and carries him into a prematurely cynical adolescence; <br> it's a vision of the American South contiguous with that of New York <br> City in the 1940s experienced by Langston Hughes.<br> Perhaps the preeminent essayist of the American twentieth <br> century is James Baldwin, and it seems fitting that Baldwin wrote his <br> most powerful and influential nonfiction works, Notes of a Native <br> Son, Nobody Knows My Name, and The Fire Next Time, at about <br> midcentury. Baldwin was a natural master of a kind of nonfiction <br> narration we associate with the most engaging fiction, in which <br> personal, familial experience is linked with a larger social and <br> political context that enhances it as myth. Like his mentor Richard <br> Wright, James Baldwin was a poet of irony; his bitterness and rage at <br> social injustice was so finely distilled, his use of language so <br> impassioned and fluent, he made of the most tragically debased <br> materials a world of startling beauty. Baldwin's is a secular <br> mystical vision that seems to us quintessentially American:<br> All of my [newly deceased] father's texts and songs, which I had <br> decided were meaningless, were arranged before me at his death like <br> empty bottles, waiting to hold the meaning which life would give them <br> for me. This was his legacy: nothing is ever escaped . . . The dead <br> man mattered, the new life mattered; blackness and whiteness did not <br> matter; to believe they did was to acquiesce in one's own <br> destruction. Hatred, which could destroy so much, never failed to <br> destroy the man who hated and this man was an immutable law.<br> This is the vision of Martin Luther King, Jr., expressed in <br> his historic 1963 "Letter from Birmingham Jail": "One who breaks an <br> unjust law must do it openly, lovingly . . . and with a willingness <br> to accept the penalty."<br> <br> Robert Atwan, who has been an invaluable series editor for the highly <br> regarded The Best American Essays since its inception in 1986, <br> assisted me tirelessly and with inspiration in our months-long effort <br> of sifting through any and all essays that were possibilities for <br> this anthology. We have been limited, or, one might say, assisted, in <br> our selections only since 1986, being obliged to choose essays from <br> the series anthology after that date; before 1986, we had no <br> restrictions. Our decision to reprint essays only by writers who have <br> published nonfiction books helped to limit our search, as did our <br> exclusion of journalism, excepting unique reportage like <br> Hemingway's "Pamplona in July" and Michael Herr's "Illumination <br> Rounds." We hoped to avoid prose fiction in essay form, though such <br> prose pieces as W.E.B. Du Bois's "Of the Coming of John" and Langston <br> Hughes's "Bop" certainly employ fictional techniques; we excluded <br> literary criticism - though some of our finest writers, like Randall <br> Jarrell, Jacques Barzun, and Lionel Trilling, have excelled in it - <br> and footnote-laden academic essays for a limited readership, even by <br> Hannah Arendt. Much as I wanted to include Henry James, as I've noted <br> above, I could not justify reprinting a long, convoluted skein of <br> words that few readers would read. Nor could I include another major <br> twentieth-century writer, Willa Cather, whose available essays were <br> simply inappropriate, and lengthy. Of Norman Mailer's nonfiction <br> work, "The Fight" would have been my choice for this volume, but it's <br> book length (and has already appeared in The Best American Sports <br> Writing of the Century); other essays of Mailer's, like "The White <br> Negro," controversial in their time, are badly dated today. Gay <br> Talese, a brilliant practitioner of what has come to be known as New <br> Journalism, has written no "essays" per se. William Carlos Williams, <br> Ralph Ellison, John Hersey, Wallace Stegner, Barbara Tuchman, Gore <br> Vidal, most painfully William Faulkner: these important writers had <br> no single appropriate essay. Faulkner in particular seems to have had <br> little aptitude, or perhaps inspiration, for the essay form.<br> Of contemporary essayists there are so many - so very many! - <br> who might well be included here, it isn't possible to list their <br> names except in the Appendix. Quite apart from the numerous memoirs <br> of high quality being written today, and published to much acclaim, <br> this is a remarkably fruitful era for the personal essay. The <br> triumph, one might say, of the mysterious pronoun "I."<br> It was the aim of the editors to tell a more or less <br> chronological story of America as the century unfolded, with <br> representative essays from each decade, as we have done; yet, the <br> reader will note, the traumatic experiences of World War II, vividly <br> described by William Manchester in "Okinawa: The Bloodiest Battle of <br> All," does not appear in the forties but decades later, in 1987; and <br> numerous other essays, stimulated by memory and meditation, have been <br> written years after the occasion of their subjects. The ideal essay, <br> in any case, is as timeless as any work of art, transcending the <br> circumstances of its inception. It moves, as Robert Frost says of the <br> ideal poem, from delight to wisdom, and "rides on its own melting," <br> like ice on a hot stove.<br> Joyce Carol Oates <br> <br> Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company<br> Introduction copyright © 2000 by The Ontario Review Inc.<br> All rights reserved<p><p>This singular collection is nothing less than a political, spiritual, and intensely personal record of America&#8217;s tumultuous modern age, as experienced by our foremost critics, commentators, activists, and artists. Joyce Carol Oates has collected a group of works that are both intimate and important, essays that move from personal experience to larger significance without severing the connection between speaker and audience.<br> From Ernest Hemingway covering bullfights in Pamplona to Martin Luther King, Jr.&#8217;s &#147;Letter from Birmingham Jail,&#8221; these essays fit, in the words of Joyce Carol Oates, &#147;into a kind of mobile mosaic suggest[ing] where we&#8217;ve come from, and who we are, and where we are going.&#8221; Among those whose work is included are Mark Twain, John Muir, T. S. Eliot, Richard Wright, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin, Tom Wolfe, Susan Sontag, Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, Joan Didion, Cynthia Ozick, Saul Bellow, Stephen Jay Gould, Edward Hoagland, and Annie Dillard.<p></p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>"Here is a history of America told in many voices," declares Oates in her introduction, revealing the heart of her intelligent and incisive collection of 55 essays by American writers. Never attempting to capture or replicate a single, authentic "American identity," this collection succeeds by producing a comprehensive and multifaceted look at what America has been and, by extension, what it is and might become. While it's not explicitly political, the volume's multicultural intentions are visible. Beginning with "Cone-pone Opinions," a 1901 Mark Twain essay that uses the wisdom of an African-American child as its central image, Oates has fashioned a collection that calls attention to the way that "America" is made up of competing, and often antagonistic, cultural and social visions. There is not only the apparent contrast between the populist, overtly political visions of W.E.B. Du Bois's "Of the Coming of John," James Baldwin's "Notes of a Native Son" and Mary McCarthy's "Artists in Uniform" and the cultural elitism of T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Oates has managed to find numerous pieces whose vision and philosophy resonate with one another without becoming homogeneous, so Gretel Ehrlich's meditation on pastoral aesthetics in "The Solace of Open Spaces" contrasts abruptly and ingeniously with Susan Sontag's urban-centered "Notes on Camp." In all, Oates has assembled a provocative collection of masterpieces reflecting both the fragmentation and surprising cohesiveness of various American identities. QPB and History Book Club selections; BOMC alternate. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Foreword</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">x</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">xvii</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1901: Corn-pone Opinions</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">1</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1903: Of the Coming of John</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">6</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1906: A Law of Acceleration</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">20</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1909: Stickeen</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">28</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1910: The Moral Equivalent of War</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">45</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1911: The Handicapped</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1912: Coatesville</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">71</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1916: The Devil Baby at Hull-House</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">75</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1919: Tradition and the Individual Talent</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">90</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1923: Pamplona in July</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">98</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1925: The Hills of Zion</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">107</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1928: How It Feels to Be Colored Me</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">114</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1933: The Old Stone House</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">118</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1935: What Are Master-pieces and Why Are There So Few of Them</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">131</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1936: The Crack-Up</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">139</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1937: Sex Ex Machina</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">153</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1937: The Ethics of Living Jim Crow: An Autobiographical Sketch</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">159</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1938: Knoxville: Summer of 1915</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">171</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1939: The Figure a Poem Makes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">176</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1941: Once More to the Lake</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">179</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1944: Insert Flap "A" and Throw Away</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">186</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1949: Bop</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">190</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1950: The Future Is Now</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">193</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1953: Artists in Uniform</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">199</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1955: The Marginal World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">214</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1955: Notes of a Native Son</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">220</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1956: The Brown Wasps</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">239</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1957: A Sweet Devouring</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">246</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1961: A Hundred Thousand Straightened Nails</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">252</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1963: Letter from Birmingham Jail</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">263</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1964: Putting Daddy On</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">280</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1964: Notes on "Camp"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1966: Perfect Past</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">303</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1967: The Way to Rainy Mountain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">313</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1968: The Apotheosis of Martin Luther King</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">319</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1969: Illumination Rounds</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">327</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1970: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">342</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1971: The Lives of a Cell</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">358</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1972: The Search for Marvin Gardens</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">361</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1972: The Doomed in Their Sinking</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">373</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1975: No Name Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">383</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1975: Looking for Zora</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">395</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1977: Women and Honor: Some Notes on Lying</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">412</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1979: The White Album</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">421</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1980: Aria: A Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">447</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1981: The Solace of Open Spaces</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">467</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1982: Total Eclipse</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">477</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1982: A Drugstore in Winter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">490</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1987: Okinawa: The Bloodiest Battle of All</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">497</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1988: Heaven and Nature</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">507</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1989: The Creation Myths of Cooperstown</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">520</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1990: Life with Daughters: Watching the Miss America Pageant</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">532</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1993: The Disposable Rocket</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">549</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1995: They All Just Went Away</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">553</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">1997: Graven Images</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">564</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Biographical Notes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">569</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%">Appendix</TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Notable Twentieth-Century American Literary Nonfiction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">591</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4><b>Bookseller Reviews</b> <p>These essays educate us, amuse us, startle us with their immediacy. Who among us can read Henry Adam's "A Law of Acceleration," penned in 1904, and not think of our mind-zapping digital age? Who could resist the first sentence of Zora Neale Hurston's piece:I am colored but I offer nothing in the way of extenuating circumstances except the fact that I am the only Negro in the United States whose grandfather on the mother's side was not an Indian chief." And which of you could disagree with the unrepeatable wisdom of Gertrude Stein's "The tradition has always been that you may more or less describe the things that happen nowadays everybody all day long knows what is happening and so what is happening is not really interesting."</p> <p>The essays that Joyce Carol Oates has selected linger with us, not because their authors (from Mark Twain to Martin Luther King), retain their fame, but because each piece is a talisman, irreducible and well-carved. James Age's prose-poems "Knoxville, Summer of 1915" appeals to us today just as it inspired composer Samuel Barber decades ago, and two thirds of a century have only enhanced the thrall of the languorous rhythms of Edmund Wilson's "The Old Stone House." H.L. Mencken's article on the 1925 Scopes trial shames this week's pale convention prose with its freshness, and T.S. Eliot's 1919 "Tradition and The Individual Talent" still has something to teach us.</p> </article> <article> <h4>Publishers Weekly - <span class="author">Publisher's Weekly</span> </h4>"Here is a history of America told in many voices," declares Oates in her introduction, revealing the heart of her intelligent and incisive collection of 55 essays by American writers. Never attempting to capture or replicate a single, authentic "American identity," this collection succeeds by producing a comprehensive and multifaceted look at what America has been and, by extension, what it is and might become. While it's not explicitly political, the volume's multicultural intentions are visible. Beginning with "Cone-pone Opinions," a 1901 Mark Twain essay that uses the wisdom of an African-American child as its central image, Oates has fashioned a collection that calls attention to the way that "America" is made up of competing, and often antagonistic, cultural and social visions. There is not only the apparent contrast between the populist, overtly political visions of W.E.B. Du Bois's "Of the Coming of John," James Baldwin's "Notes of a Native Son" and Mary McCarthy's "Artists in Uniform" and the cultural elitism of T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent." Oates has managed to find numerous pieces whose vision and philosophy resonate with one another without becoming homogeneous, so Gretel Ehrlich's meditation on pastoral aesthetics in "The Solace of Open Spaces" contrasts abruptly and ingeniously with Susan Sontag's urban-centered "Notes on Camp." In all, Oates has assembled a provocative collection of masterpieces reflecting both the fragmentation and surprising cohesiveness of various American identities. QPB and History Book Club selections; BOMC alternate. Sept. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information. </article><article> <h4>From The Critics</h4>". . . Oates has assembled a provocative collection of masterpieces <br> reflecting both the fragmentation and surprising cohesiveness of <br> various American identities." </article> <article> <h4>KLIATT</h4>In her excellent introduction to this collection, Joyce Carol Oates states her belief that "art should not be comforting." It should, instead, "provoke, disturb,...and expand our sympathies in directions we may not anticipate and may not even wish." The reader should therefore be prepared to have these 55 carefully selected essays do just that. Arranged chronologically, the essays span the century with an average of five essays per decade. From Mark Twain to Saul Bellow by way of William James, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost and Gertrude Stein, the collection notes literary trends as well as social upheavals as recorded in essays of W.E.B DuBois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright. Chosen from authors who had published at least one book of nonfiction or essays, this collection attempts to present a "mobile mosaic" of 20th-century America. Category: Collections. KLIATT Codes: SA—Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2001, Houghton Mifflin, 624p., Ages 16 to adult. Reviewer: Patricia A. Moore; Brookline, MA </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>One of the pleasures of an anthology like this is reading people you might not otherwise have picked up. Like John Muir, whose "Stickeen," a life-and-death adventure on an Alaskan glacier with a singular small black dog, is a great piece of adventure writing. Or Jane Addams, whose insights into the spread of an urban legend of "The Devil Baby at Hull House" are thoughtful and compassionate. Another sort of pleasure comes from rereading familiar works in a new context: E.B. White's "Once More to the Lake," N. Scott Momaday's "The Way to Rainy Mountain," John McPhee's "The Search for Marvin Gardens," and Annie Dillard's "Total Eclipse." Only seven of the essays come from the annual "Best American Essays" series that Atwan has coedited since 1986. The other 48 were culled from the rest of the century, with the ruling idea, Atwan says, "that the essays should speak to the present, not merely represent the past." Oates looked "for the expression of personal experience within the historical." They have created a mosaic of a century in an America whose dominant and recurring theme has been race. Essential for most libraries.--Mary Paumier Jones, Westminster P.L., CO Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\ </article> <article> <h4>Megan Harlan</h4>...all the essays transcend fashion and speak just as eloquestly to us today as they did when they were first published.<br> —<i>Entertainment Weekly</i> </article>
52The Best Loved Poems of the American PeopleHazel Felleman0Hazel Felleman (Selected by), Edward Frank Allen (Introduction), Hazel Fellemanthe-best-loved-poems-of-the-american-peoplehazel-felleman97803850001920385000197$17.92HardcoverKnopf Doubleday Publishing GroupOctober 1936ReissuePoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, Poetry - General & Miscellaneous, American Literature Anthologies6705.99 (w) x 8.56 (h) x 2.06 (d)More than 1,500,000 copies in print! Over 575&nbsp;&nbsp;traditional favorites to be read and reread.&nbsp;&nbsp;Categorized by theme, and indexed by author and first&nbsp;&nbsp;line, this is a collection that will be treasured.<p><P>More than 1,500,000 copies in print! Over 575&#160;&#160;traditional favorites to be read and reread.&#160;&#160;Categorized by theme, and indexed by author and first&#160;&#160;line, this is a collection that will be treasured.</p>
53The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Volume A: Beginnings to 1820Wayne Franklin0<p><b>Nina Baym</b> (General Editor), Ph.D. Harvard, is Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor Emerita of English, and Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is author of <b>The Shape of Hawthorne&rsquo;s Career</b>; <b>Woman's Fiction&#58; A Guide to Novels by and About Women in America</b>; <b>Novels, Readers, and Reviewers&#58; Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America</b>; <b>American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790-1860</b>; and <b>American Women of Letters and the Nineteenth-Century Sciences</b>. Some of her essays are collected in <b>Feminism and American Literary History</b>; she has also edited and introduced many reissues of work by earlier American women writers, from Judith Sargent Murray through Kate Chopin. In 2000 she received the MLA&rsquo;s Hubbell medal for lifetime achievement in American literary studies.<P><b>Wayne Franklin</b>, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh), is Professor and Head of English, University of Connecticut. He is the author of <b>James Fenimore Cooper&#58; The Early Years</b> (the first volume of his definitive biography, from Yale University Press), <b>The New World of James Fenimore Cooper</b>, and <b>Discoverers, Explorers, Settlers&#58; The Diligent Writers of Early America</b>. He is the editor of <b>American Voices, American Lives&#58; A Documentary Reader</b> and co-editor of <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> and of, with Michael Steiner, <b>Mapping American Culture</b>.<P><b>Philip F. Gura</b> (Editor, 1700-1820), Ph.D. Harvard, is William S. Newman Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture and Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of seven books, including <b>The Wisdom of Words&#58; Language, Theology, and Literature in the New England Renaissance</b>; <b>A Glimpse of Sion&rsquo;s Glory&#58; Puritan Radicalism in New England, 1620-1660</b>; and <b>Jonathan Edwards, America's Evangelical</b>. For ten years he was editor of the journal <b>Early American Literature</b>. He is an elected member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Colonial Society of Massachusetts.<P><b>Arnold Krupat</b> (editor, Native American Literatures), Ph.D. Columbia, is Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College. He is the author, among other books, of <b>Ethnocriticism&#58; Ethnography, History, Literature</b>, <b>The Voice in the Margin&#58; Native American Literature and the Canon</b>, <b>Red Matters</b>, and most recently, <b>All That Remains&#58; Native Studies</b> (2007). He is the editor of a number of anthologies, including <b>Native American Autobiography&#58; An Anthology and New Voices in Native American Literary Criticism</b>. With Brian Swann, he edited <b>Here First&#58; Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers</b>, which won the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Award for best book of nonfiction prose in 2001.</p>Wayne Franklin (Editor), Jerome Klinkowitz (Editor), Arnold Krupat (Editor), Philip F. Gura (Editor), Bruce Michelsonthe-norton-anthology-of-american-literaturewayne-franklin97803939273990393927393$37.77PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.April 20077th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies9726.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)<p><b>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field,</b> The Norton Anthology of American Literature has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p> <p>Under Nina Baym’s direction, the editors have considered afresh each selection and all the apparatus to make the anthology an even better teaching tool.</p><p>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field, <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p>
54The Norton Anthology of PoetryMargaret Ferguson0<p><b>Margaret Ferguson</b> (Ph.D. Yale University) is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California&mdash;Davis. She is author of <b>Dido&rsquo;s Daughters&#58; Literacy, Gender, and Empire in Early Modern England and France</b> (2003) and <b>Trials of Desire&#58; Renaissance Defenses of Poetry</b> (1984). She is coeditor of <b>Feminism in Time</b>, <b>Women, Property, and the Letters of the Law</b>, <b>Literacies in Early Modern England</b> and a critical edition of Elizabeth Cary&rsquo;s <b>Tragedy of Mariam</b>.<P><b>Mary Jo Salter</b> (M.A. Cambridge University) is Emily Dickinson Senior Lecturer in the Humanities at Mount Holyoke College, where she teaches poetry and poetry-writing. She has published several books of poems, including <b>Henry Purcell in Japan</b> (1985), <b>Unfinished Painting</b> (1989), <b>Sunday Skaters</b> (1994), <b>A Kiss in Space</b> (1999), and, most recently, <b>Open Shutters</b> (2003). A vice president of the Poetry Society of America, she has also served as poetry editor of <b>The New Republic</b>.<P><b>Jon Stallworthy</b> (M.A. and B.Litt. Oxford) is Senior Research Fellow at Wolfson College of Oxford University, where he is also Professor of English Literature. He is also the former John Wendell Anderson Professor at Cornell, where he taught after a career at Oxford University Press. His biography of Wilfred Owen won the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize, the W. H. Smith Literary Award, and the E. M. Forster Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His biography of Louis MacNeice won the Southern Arts Literary Prize. He is also the author of <b>Rounding the Horn&#58; Collected Poems</b> and <b>Singing School&#58; The Making of a Poet</b> and he is the editor of the definitive edition of Wilfred Owen&rsquo;s poetry, <b>The Complete Poems and Fragments</b>; <b>The Penguin Book of Love Poetry</b>; and <b>The Oxford Book of War Poetry</b>. Stallworthy has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and is a fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society of Literature.</p>Margaret Ferguson, Jon Stallworthy, Mary Jo Salter, Jon Stallworthy (Editor), Mary Jo Salterthe-norton-anthology-of-poetrymargaret-ferguson97803939792060393979202$66.30PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.December 20045th EditionPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, English Poetry, English & Irish Literature Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies22566.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.00 (d)<p><b>Offering over one thousand years of verse from the medieval period to the present,</b> The Norton Anthology of Poetry is the classroom standard for the study of poetry in English.</p> <p>The Fifth Edition retains the flexibility and breadth of selection that has defined this classic anthology, while improved and expanded editorial apparatus make it an even more useful teaching tool.</p><p>Offering over one thousand years of verse from the medieval period to the present, <b>The Norton Anthology of Poetry</b> is the classroom standard for the study of poetry in English.</p>
55The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, Vol. 2Henry Louis Gates Jr.0<p><b>Henry Louis Gates Jr.</b> (Ph.D. Cambridge) is Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, at Harvard University. He is the author of <b>Figures in Black&#58; Words, Signs, and the Racial Self</b>; <b>The Signifying Monkey&#58; A Theory of Afro-American Criticism</b>; <b>Loose Canons&#58; Notes on the Culture Wars</b>; <b>Colored People&#58; A Memoir</b>; <b>The Future of Race</b> (with Cornel West); <b>Wonders of the African World</b>; <b>Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man</b>; and <b>America Behind the Color Line&#58; Dialogues with African Americans</b>. He is general editor (with the late Nellie Y. McKay) of <b>The Norton Anthology of African American Literature</b>; editor-in-chief of the Oxford African American Studies Center (online); editor of <b>The African-American Century</b> (with Cornel West); <b>Encarta Africana</b> (with Kwame Anthony Appiah); and <b>The Bondwoman&rsquo;s Narrative</b> by Hannah Craft; <b>African American National Biography</b> (with Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham) and <b>The Annotated Uncle Tom&rsquo;s Cabin</b> (with Hollis Robbins). For PBS, Professor Gates has written and produced several documentaries, among them <b>African American Lives</b>, series 1 and 2, and <b>America Behind the Color Line</b>.<P><b>Nellie Y. McKay</b> (Ph.D. Harvard), General Editor. Professor of American and Afro-American Literature, University of Wisconsin, Madison. Associate editor of the <b>African American Review</b>; author of <b>Jean Toomer&mdash;the Artist&#58; A Study of His Literary Life and Work, 1894-1936</b>; editor of <b>Critical Essays on Toni Morrison</b>; co-editor of the Norton Critical Edition of Harriet Jacobs&rsquo;s <b>Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl</b>, <b>Beloved&mdash;A Casebook</b>, and <b>Approaches to Teaching the Novels of Toni Morrison</b>.<P><b>William L. Andrews</b> (Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Editor, "The Literature of Slavery and Freedom," Co-Editor, "the Literature of the Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance." E. Maynard Adams Professor of English, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. General editor of the Wisconsin Studies in American Autobiography series and <b>The Literature of the American South&#58; A Norton Anthology</b>, and co-editor of <b>The Oxford Companion to African American Literature</b>. Other works include <b>The Literary Career of Charles W. Chesnutt</b>; <b>To Tell a Free Story&#58; The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760&ndash;1865</b>; <b>Sisters of the Spirit</b>; <b>Critical Essays on Frederick Douglass</b>; and <b>Classic Fiction of the Harlem Renaissance</b>.<P><b>Houston A. Baker, Jr.</b> (Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles), Editor, "The Black Arts Era." George D. and Susan Fox Beischer Professor of English, Duke University. Editor of <b>American Literature</b>; Editor of the anthology <b>Black Literature in America</b> and author of three books of poetry. Other works include <b>Afro-American Poetics&#58; Revisions of Harlem and The Black Aesthetic</b>; <b>Workings of the Spirit&#58; A Poetics of Afro-American Women&rsquo;s Writing</b>; <b>Black Studies, Rap, and the Academy</b>; <b>Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature&#58; A Vernacular Theory</b>; <b>Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance</b>; <b>Turning South Again&#58; Re-Thinking Modernism/Re-Reading Booker T</b>.<P><b>Frances Smith Foster</b> (Ph.D. University of California, San Diego), Co-Editor, "The Literature of the Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance." Charles Howard Candler Professor of English and Women&rsquo;s Studies, Emory University. Author of <b>Written by Herself&#58; Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892</b> and <b>Witnessing Slavery&#58; The Development of the Antebellum Slave Narrative</b>. Co-editor of the <b>Oxford Companion to African American Literature</b> and the Norton Critical Edition of Harriet Jacobs&rsquo;s <b>Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl</b>. Editor of several works, including Minnie&rsquo;s <b>Sacrifice, Sowing and Reaping</b>, <b>Trial and Triumph&#58; Three Rediscovered Novels by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper</b>, and Elizabeth Keckley&rsquo;s <b>Behind the Scenes</b>.<P>A former fellow of the Bunting Institute and the Woodrow Wilson International Center, <b>Deborah E. McDowell</b> is a professor of English at the University of Virginia.<P><b>Robert G. O&rsquo;Meally</b> (Ph.D. Harvard), Editor, "The Vernacular Tradition." Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English, Columbia University. Author of <b>The Craft of Ralph Ellison</b> and the biography <b>Lady Day&#58; The Many Faces of Billie Holiday</b>, and editor of the essay collection <b>History and Memory in African American Culture</b>. Currently editing an essay collection titled <b>The Jazz Cadence of American Culture</b>.<P><b>Arnold Rampersad</b> (Ph.D. Harvard), Editor, "The Harlem Renaissance." Sara Hart Kimball Professor in the Humanities, Stanford University. Co-Editor of <b>Slavery and the Literary Imagination</b> (with Deborah E. McDowell); editor of the definitive <b>Collected Poems of Langston Hughes</b> and author of the two-volume biography <b>The Life of Langston Hughes</b>. Also author of <b>Jackie Robinson&#58; A Biography</b> and joint author of tennis star <b>Arthur Ashe&rsquo;s Days of Grace&#58; A Memoir</b>.<P><b>Hortense Spillers</b> (Ph.D. Brandeis), Co-Editor, "Realism, Naturalism, Modernism." Frederick J. Whiton Chair of English, Cornell University. Editor of <b>Comparative American Identities&#58; Race, Sex, and Nationality in the Modern Text</b>; co-editor (with Marjorie Pryse) of <b>Conjuring&#58; Black Women, Fiction and the Literary Tradition</b>, and an editor of <b>The Heath Anthology of American Literature</b>.<P><b>Cheryl A. Wall</b> (Ph.D. Harvard), Editor, "Literature since 1975." Professor and Chair of English, Rutgers University. Author of <b>Women of the Harlem Renaissance</b>; editor of <b>Zora Neale Hurston&#58; Novels and Stories</b>, <b>Zora Neale Hurston&#58; Folklore, Memoirs & Other Writings</b>, and <b>Changing Our Own Words&#58; Essays on Criticism, Theory, and Writing by Black Women</b>.</p>Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Editor), Nellie Y. McKaythe-norton-anthology-of-african-american-literaturehenry-louis-gates-jr97803939777830393977781$72.82PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.December 20032nd EditionPeoples & Cultures - American Anthologies28326.00 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 2.30 (d)<p><b>Welcomed on publication as "brilliant, definitive, and a joy to teach from,"</b> The Norton Anthology of African American Literature was adopted at more than 1,275 colleges and universities worldwide. Now, the new Second Edition offers these highlights.</p><p>Welcomed on publication as "brilliant, definitive, and a joy to teach from," <b>The Norton Anthology of African American Literature</b> was adopted at more than 1,275 colleges and universities worldwide. Now, the new Second Edition offers these highlights.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>Collaborating on The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, editors Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Nellie Y. McKay have compiled what may be the definitive collection of its kind. Organized chronologically, the massive work gathers writings from six periods of black history: slavery and freedom; Reconstruction; the Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism and Modernism; the Black Arts Movement and the period since the 1970s. The work begins with the vernacular tradition of spirituals, gospel and the blues; continues through work songs, jazz and rap; ranges through sermons and folktales; and embraces letters and journals, poetry, short fiction, novels, autobiography and drama. BOMC selection; companion audio CD.</p><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly - <span class="author">Publisher's Weekly</span> </h4>Collaborating on The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, editors Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Nellie Y. McKay have compiled what may be the definitive collection of its kind. Organized chronologically, the massive work gathers writings from six periods of black history: slavery and freedom; Reconstruction; the Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism and Modernism; the Black Arts Movement and the period since the 1970s. The work begins with the vernacular tradition of spirituals, gospel and the blues; continues through work songs, jazz and rap; ranges through sermons and folktales; and embraces letters and journals, poetry, short fiction, novels, autobiography and drama. BOMC selection; companion audio CD. </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>In this anthology, blues, gospel, jazz, rap, and sermons take center stage. In close proximity are poetry, fiction, drama, and autobiography by major authors like Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Toni Morrison. </article>
56Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and AnthologyHelen Vendler0<p><p><b>HELEN VENDLER</b>, critic and scholar of English-language poetry from the seventeenth century to the present, is A. Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University-the first woman to hold a University Professorship, the highest academic distinction Harvard bestows. She has been poetry critic of <i>The New Yorker</i> since 1978, and has been a member of the Pulitzer Prize jury for poetry. Author of ground-breaking scholarly studies on George Herbert, John Keats, Wallace Stevens, William Butler Yeats, Shakespeare's sonnets, and Seamus Heaney, she won the National Book Critic's Circle Award for Criticism in 1981, and her criticism has been collected in several volumes, including <i>Part of Nature, Part of Us, The Music of What Happens,</i> and <i>Soul Says</i>.<p></p>Helen Vendlerpoems-poets-poetryhelen-vendler97803124631990312463197$1.99PaperbackBedford/St. Martin'sOctober 20093rd EditionPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, English Poetry, English & Irish Literature Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies7525.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)<br> Many students today are puzzled by the meaning and purpose of poetry. <i>Poems, Poets, Poetry</i> demystifies the form and introduces students to its artistry and pleasures, using methods that Helen Vendler has successfully used herself over her long, celebrated career. Guided by Vendler’s erudite yet down-to-earth approach, students at all levels can benefit from her authoritative instruction. Her blend of new and canonical poets includes the broadest selection of new and multi-racial poets offered by any introductory text. Comprehensive and astute, this text engages students in effective ways of reading — and taking delight in — poetry.<p><p>Written by a preeminent critic and legendary teacher, this text and anthology presents the incisive, practical methods of reading and writing that Helen Vendler has used for decades to demystify poetry for her students and introduce them to its artistry and pleasures.<p></p><p><p>Preface&#58; About This Book <p><p>Brief Contents <p><p>Contents <p><p>Chronological Contents <p><p>About Poets and Poetry <p><p><p><B>PART I. AN INTRODUCTION TO POETRY <p><p></B><p><p><B>1. The Poem as Life <p><p></B>The Private Life <p><p>William Blake, <I>Infant Sorrow <p><p></I>Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>The School Children <p><p></I>E. E. Cummings, <I>in Just- <p><p></I><B>NEW </B>Robert Hayden, <I>Those Winter Sundays <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>Hours Continuing Long <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Plain Sense of Things <p><p></I>The Public Life <p><p>Michael Harper, <I>American History <p><p></I>Charles Simic, <I>Old Couple <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>Skunk Hour <p><p></I>Nature and Time <p><p>Anonymous, <I>The Cuckoo Song <p><p></I>Dave Smith, <I>The Spring Poem <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>The Human Seasons <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 60 (Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore) <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; The Poem as Life <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>Sir Thomas Wyatt, <I>They Flee from Me <p><p></I>Ben Jonson, <I>On My First Son <p><p></I>John Milton, <I>On the Late Massacre in Piedmont <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>When I Have Fears <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>A narrow Fellow in the grass <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>Theme for English B <p><p></I>Dylan Thomas, <I>Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night <p><p></I>Sylvia Plath, <I>Daddy <p><p></I>Rita Dove, <I>Flash Cards <p><p></I>Yusef Komunyakaa, <I>Facing It <p><p></I>Julia Alvarez, <I>Homecoming <p><p></I><p><p><B>2. The Poem as Arranged Life <p><p></B>The Private Life <p><p>William Blake, <I>Infant Joy <p><p></I>William Blake, <I>Infant Sorrow <p><p></I>Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>The School Children <p><p></I>E. E. Cummings, <I>in Just- <p><p></I>Robert Hayden, <I>Those Winter Sundays <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>Hours Continuing Long <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Plain Sense of Things <p><p></I>The Public Life <p><p>Michael S. Harper, <I>American History <p><p></I>Charles Simic, <I>Old Couple <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>Skunk Hour <p><p></I>Nature and Time <p><p>Anonymous, <I>The Cuckoo Song <p><p></I>Dave Smith, <I>The Spring Poem <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>The Human Seasons <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 60 (Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore) <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; The Poem as Arranged Life <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>Anonymous, <I>Lord Randal <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 29 (When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes) <p><p></I>Chidiock Tichborne, <I>Tichborne's Elegy <p><p></I>John Donne, <I>A Valediction&#58; Forbidding Mourning <p><p></I>Robert Herrick, <I>Upon Julia's Clothes <p><p></I>George Herbert, <I>Love (III) <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>A Noiseless Patient Spider <p><p></I>Thomas Hardy, <I>The Convergence of the Twain <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>The Road Not Taken <p><p></I>Margaret Atwood, <I>Footnote to the Amnesty Report on Torture <p><p></I>Marilyn Nelson, <I>Live Jazz, Franklin Park Zoo <p><p></I><p><p><B>3. Poems as Pleasure <p><p></B>Rhythm <p><p>Rhyme <p><p>Ben Jonson, <I>On Gut <p><p></I>Structure <p><p>William Carlos Williams, <I>Poem <p><p></I>Gwendolyn Brooks, <I>We Real Cool <p><p></I>Images <p><p>William Blake, <I>London <p><p></I>Argument <p><p>Christopher Marlowe, <I>The Passionate Shepherd to His Love <p><p></I>Walter Ralegh, <I>The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd <p><p></I>Poignancy <p><p>William Wordsworth, <I>A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal <p><p></I>Wisdom <p><p>A New Language <p><p>Finding Yourself <p><p>In Brief&#58; Poems as Pleasure <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 130 (My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun) <p><p></I>Robert Herrick, <I>To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time <p><p></I>William Blake, <I>The Sick Rose <p><p></I>Gerard Manley Hopkins, <I>Pied Beauty</I> <p><p>Thomas Hardy, <I>The Darkling Thrush <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>After Apple-Picking <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>Unharvested <p><p></I>D.H. Lawrence, <I>Snake <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>The Dance <p><p></I>Theodore Roethke, <I>My Papa's Waltz <p><p></I>Derek Walcott, <I>The Season of Phantasmal Peace <p><p></I>Elizabeth Alexander, <I>Nineteen <p><p></I><p><p><B>4. Describing Poems <p><p></B>Poetic Kinds <p><p>Narrative versus Lyric; Narrative as Lyric <p><p>Adrienne Rich, <I>Necessities of Life <p><p></I>Philip Larkin, <I>Talking in Bed <p><p></I>Classifying Lyric Poems <p><p>Content genres <p><p>Emily Dickinson, <I>The Heart asks Pleasure--first-- <p><p></I>Speech Acts <p><p>Carl Sandburg, <I>Grass <p><p></I>Outer Form <p><p>Line Width <p><p>Rhythm <p><p>Poem Length <p><p>Combinatorial Form Names <p><p>Inner Structural Form <p><p>Sentences <p><p>Robert Herrick, <I>The Argument of His Book <p><p></I>Person <p><p>Agency <p><p>Randall Jarrell, <I>The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner <p><p></I>Tenses <p><p>William Wordsworth, <I>A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal <p><p></I>Images, or Sensuous Words <p><p>Sylvia Plath, <I>Metaphors <p><p></I>Exploring a Poem <p><p>John Keats, <I>Upon First Looking into Chapman's Homer <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; Describing Poems <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 129 (Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame) <p><p></I>George Herbert, <I>Easter Wings <p><p></I>Andrew Marvell, <I>The Garden <p><p></I>John Milton, <I>When I Consider How My Light is Spent <p><p></I>Anne Bradstreet, <I>To My Dear and Loving Husband <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>Ode to a Nightingale <p><p></I>Matthew Arnold, <I>Dover Beach <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>Mending Wall <p><p></I>Ezra Pound, <I>The River Merchant's Wife&#58; A Letter <p><p></I>Mark Strand, <I>Courtship <p><p></I>Seamus Heaney, <I>From the Frontier of Writing <p><p></I>Jorie Graham, <I>San Sepolcro <p><p></I>Sherman Alexie, <I>Evolution <p><p></I><p><p><B>5. The Play of Language <p><p></B>Sound Units <p><p>Word Roots <p><p>Words <p><p>Sentences <p><p>Robert Frost, <I>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>The Heart asks Pleasure--first-- <p><p></I>Implication <p><p>The Ordering of Language <p><p>George Herbert, <I>Prayer (I) <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 66 (Tired with all these, for restful death I cry) <p><p></I>Michael Drayton, <I>Since there's no help <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; The Play of Language <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>John Donne, <I>Holy Sonnet 14 (Batter my heart, three-personed God; for You) <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>To Autumn <p><p></I>Robert Browning, <I>My Last Duchess <p><p></I>Henry Reed, <I>Naming of Parts <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>The Wild Swans at Coole <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Emperor of Ice-Cream <p><p></I>H.D., <I>Oread <p><p></I>E.E. Cummings, <I>r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r <p><p></I>Elizabeth Bishop, <I>One Art <p><p></I>Joy Harjo,<I> Song for Deer and Myself to Return On <p><p></I>Lorna Dee Cervantes, <I>Poema para los Californios Muertos <p><p></I><p><p><B>6. Constructing a Self <p><p></B>Multiple Aspects <p><p>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 30 (When to the sessions of sweet silent thought) <p><p></I>Change of Discourse <p><p>Space and Time <p><p>Seamus Heaney, <I>Mid-Term Break <p><p></I>Testimony <p><p>Motivations <p><p>Typicality <p><p>Tone as a Marker of Selfhood <p><p>Gerard Manley Hopkins, <I>Spring and Fall <p><p></I>Imagination <p><p>Emily Dickinson, <I>I heard a Fly buzz--when I died-- <p><p></I>Persona <p><p>William Butler Yeats, <I>Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; Constructing a Self <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>John Dryden, <I>Sylvia the Fair <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>I'm Nobody! Who are you? <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>An Irish Airman Foresees His Death <p><p></I>Thomas Hardy, <I>The Ruined Maid <p><p></I>T. S. Eliot, <I>The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>To Elsie <p><p></I>Countee Cullen, <I>Heritage <p><p></I>Anne Sexton, <I>Her Kind <p><p></I>Charles Wright, <I>Self-Portrait <p><p></I>Jane Kenyon, <I>Otherwise <p><p></I>Carl Phillips, <I>Africa Says <p><p></I><p><p><B>7. Poetry and Social Identity <p><p></B>Adrienne Rich, <I>Mother-in-Law <p><p></I>Adrienne Rich, <I>Prospective Immigrants Please Note <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>Genius Child <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>Me and the Mule <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>High to Low <p><p></I>Seamus Heaney, <I>Terminus <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; Poetry and Social Identity <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>Robert Southwell, <I>The Burning Babe <p><p></I>Thomas Nashe, <I>A Litany in Time of Plague <p><p></I>Anne Bradstreet, <I>A Letter to Her Husband Absent Upon Public Employment <p><p></I>William Blake, <I>The Little Black Boy <p><p></I>Edward Lear, <I>How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear <p><p></I>Gerard Manley Hopkins, <I>Felix Randal <p><p></I>Sylvia Plath, <I>The Applicant <p><p></I>David Mura, <I>An Argument&#58; On 1942 <p><p></I>Rita Dove, <I>Wingfoot Lake <p><p></I>Sheila Ortiz Taylor, <I>The Way Back <p><p></I><p><p><B>8. History and Regionality <p><p></B>History <p><p>William Wordsworth, <I>A slumber did my spirit seal <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>The March 1 <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>World War II <p><p></I>Wilfred Owen, <I>Dulce et Decorum Est <p><p></I>Regionality <p><p>Sherman Alexie, <I>On the Amtrak from Boston to New York City <p><p></I>William Wordsworth, <I>Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802</I> <p><p>In Brief&#58; History and Regionality <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>Samuel Taylor Coleridge, <I>Kubla Khan <p><p></I>William Wordsworth, <I>Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>Ode on a Grecian Urn <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>Easter 1916 <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>Anecdote of the Jar <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>For the Union Dead <p><p></I>Robert Hayden, <I>Night, Death, Mississippi <p><p></I>W.S. Merwin, <I>The Asians Dying <p><p></I>Derek Walcott, <I>The Gulf <p><p></I>Simon J. Ortiz, <I>Bend in the River <p><p></I>Jorie Graham, <I>What the End Is For <p><p></I>Gary Soto, <I>History <p><p></I>Silvia Curbelo, <I>Balsero Singing <p><p></I>Dionisio Martinez, <I>History as a Second Language <p><p></I><p><p><B>9. Attitudes, Values, Judgments <p><p></B>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 76 (Why is my verse so barren of new pride?) <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>Epilogue <p><p></I>In Brief&#58; Attitudes, Values, Judgments <p><p>Reading Other Poems <p><p>John Milton, <I>Lycidas <p><p></I>Ben Jonson, <I>Still to Be Neat <p><p></I>Richard Lovelace, <I>To Lucasta, Going to the Wars <p><p></I>Phillis Wheatley, <I>On Being Brought from Africa to America <p><p></I>Elizabeth Barrett Browning, <I>How Do I Love Thee? <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>Meru <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>The Gift Outright <p><p></I>Allen Ginsberg, <I>Sunflower Sutra <p><p></I>Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>Mock Orange <p><p></I>Rita Dove, <I>Parsley <p><p></I>Heidy Steidlmayer, <I>Knife-Sharpener&#8217;s Song </I><p><I></I> <p><p><B>New 10. Poets on Poetry </B><p>Poetry as Imagination <p>Art&#8217;s Fiction, Truth&#8217;s Claims <p>Poetry as Song <p>Poetry as Words <p>Poetry as an Evolving Structure <p>Poetry as a Destructive Force <p>The Idea of Lyric <p>Why Poetry at All? <p>Emily Dickinson,<I> This is my letter to the World</I> <p>Poetry Over Time <p>The Poet&#8217;s Audience <p>Poetry and Style <p><p><p><B>PART II. WRITING ABOUT POETRY <p><p></B><p><p><B>11. Writing about Poems <p><p></B>Basic Principles <p><p>A Brief Example <p><p>Robert Herrick, <I>Divination by a Daffodil <p><p></I>A Longer Example&#58; <p><p>William Wordsworth, <I>I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud <p><p></I>Getting it Down on Paper <p><p>Begin with a Question <p><p>Present Your Case <p><p>Draw Your Conclusions <p><p>Keeping Your Readers in Mind <p><p>A Note on Writing about Unrhymed Poems <p><p>Organizing Your Paper <p><p>A Note on Well-Ordered Paragraphs <p><p>Checking Your Work <p><p><p><B>12. Studying Groups of Poems <p><p></B>Walt Whitman&#58; Poems on Lincoln <p><p>Walt Whitman, <I>Hush'd Be the Camps To-Day <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>O Captain! My Captain! <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>This dust was once a man <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson&#58; Poems on Time <p><p>Emily Dickinson, <I>I like to see it lap the Miles&#8212; <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Because I could not stop for Death&#8212; <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>The Heart asks Pleasure&#8212;first&#8212; <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>I felt a Cleaving in my Mind <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>The first Day's Night had come&#8212; <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>After great pain, a formal feeling comes <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>There's a certain Slant of light <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Pain-expands the Time <p><p></I>Writing Your Paper <p><p><p><p><B>PART III. ANTHOLOGY <p><p></B>Sherman Alexie, <I>Reservation Love Song <p><p></I>Paula Gunn Allen, <I>Zen Americana <p><p></I><B>New</B> Julia Alvarez, <I>from</I> 33 <p><p>A. R. Ammons, <I>The City Limits <p><p></I>A. R. Ammons, <I>Easter Morning <p><p></I>Anonymous, <I>Sir Patrick Spens <p><p></I>Anonymous, <I>Western Wind <p><p></I>Matthew Arnold, <I>Shakespeare <p><p></I>Matthew Arnold, <I>To Marguerite <p><p></I>John Ashbery, <I>Paradoxes and Oxymorons <p><p></I>John Ashbery, <I>Street Musicians</I> <p><p><B>New</B> Margaret Atwood, <I>Habitation <p><p></I>Margaret Atwood, <I>This is a Photograph of Me <p><p></I>Margaret Atwood, <I>Up <p><p></I>W. H. Auden, <I>As I Walked Out One Evening <p><p></I>W.H. Auden,<I> Mus&#233;e des Beaux Arts <p><p></I>John Berryman, from <I>Dream Songs <p><p></I><I>4 (Filling her compact & delicious body) <p><p></I><I>45 (He stared at ruin. Ruin stared straight back) <p><p></I><I>384 (The marker slants, flowerless, day's almost done) <p><p></I><B>New</B> Frank Bidart, <I>An American in Hollywood <p><p></I><B>New </B>Frank Bidart, <I>If See No End In Is <p><p></I>Frank Bidart, <I>To My Father <p><p></I>Elizabeth Bishop, <I>At the Fishhouses <p><p></I>Elizabeth Bishop, <I>Poem</I> <p><p>Elizabeth Bishop, <I>Sestina</I> <p><p>William Blake, <I>Ah! Sun-flower</I> <p><p>William Blake, <I>The Garden of Love <p><p></I>William Blake, <I>The Lamb <p><p></I><B>New</B> William Blake, <I>The Mental Traveller <p><p></I>William Blake, <I>The Tyger <p><p></I>Richard Blanco,<I> Letters for Mam&#225; <p><p></I>Michael Blumenthal, <I>A Marriage</I> <p><p><B>New</B> Michael Blumenthal, <I>Early Childhood Education <p><p></I>Anne Bradstreet, <I>Before the Birth of One of Her Children <p><p></I>Lucy Brock-Broido, <I>Carrowmore <p><p></I>Lucy Brock-Broido, <I>Domestic Mysticism</I> <p><p><B>New</B> Lucy Brock-Broido, <I>Self-Deliverance by Lion <p><p></I>Emily Bronte, <I>No Coward Soul Is Mine <p><p></I>Emily Bronte, <I>Remembrance <p><p></I>Gwendolyn Brooks, <I>The Bean Eaters <p><p></I><B>New</B> Gwendolyn Brooks, <I>Beverly Hills, Chicago <p><p></I>Elizabeth Barrett Browning, <I>A Musical Instrument <p><p></I>Robert Browning, <I>Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came <p><p></I>Robert Burns, <I>O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast <p><p></I>Robert Burns, <I>A Red, Red Rose <p><p></I>George Gordon, <I>Lord Byron, When We Two Parted <p><p></I>Lorna Dee Cervantes, <I>Freeway 280 <p><p></I>Marilyn Chin, <I>Autumn Leaves <p><p></I><B>New</B> Victoria Chang, <I>$4.99 All You Can Eat Sunday Brunch <p><p></I>John Clare, <I>Badger <p><p></I>John Clare, <I>First Love <p><p></I>John Clare, <I>I Am <p><p></I><B>New</B> Lucille Clifton, <I>the lost baby poem <p><p></I><B>New</B> Henry Cole, <I>Car Wash <p><p></I>Henri Cole, <I>40 Days and 40 Nights <p><p></I>Samuel Taylor Coleridge, <I>Dejection&#58; An Ode <p><p></I>Samuel Taylor Coleridge, <I>The Rime of the Ancient Mariner <p><p></I><B>New</B> Eduardo C. Corral, <I>Monologue of a Vulture&#8217;s Shadow <p><p></I>William Cowper, <I>The Castaway <p><p></I>William Cowper, <I>Epitaph on a Hare</I> <p><p>Hart Crane, <I>The Broken Tower <p><p></I>Hart Crane, <I>To Brooklyn Bridge <p><p></I><B>New</B> Robert Creeley, <I>When I think <p><p></I>Countee Cullen, <I>Incident <p><p></I>E.E. Cummings, <I>may I feel he said he <p><p></I><B>New</B> E.E. Cummings, <I>next to of course god america i <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>The Brain--is wider than the Sky-- <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>I like a look of Agony <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Much Madness is divinest Sense-- <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Safe in their Alabaster Chambers (1859) <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Safe in their Alabaster Chambers (1861) <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>The Soul selects her own Society&#8212; <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>There's a certain Slant of light <p><p></I>Emily Dickinson, <I>Wild Nights--Wild Nights! <p><p></I><B>New</B> John Donne, <I>Breake of day <p><p></I>John Donne, <I>Death, be not proud <p><p></I>John Donne, <I>The Sun Rising <p><p></I><B>New</B> Timothy Donnelly, <I>Reading of Medieval Life, I Wonder Who I Am <p><p></I>Rita Dove, <I>Adolescence--II <p><p></I>Rita Dove, <I>Dusting <p><p></I>Paul Laurence Dunbar, <I>Harriet Beecher Stowe <p><p></I>Paul Laurence Dunbar, <I>Robert Gould Shaw</I> <p><p>Paul Laurence Dunbar, <I>We Wear the Mask <p><p></I><B>New</B> Roberto Dur&#225;n, <I>Protest <p><p></I>T. S. Eliot, <I>Preludes <p><p></I>Thomas Sayers Ellis, <I>View of the Library of Congress from Paul Laurence Dunbar High</I> <I>School <p><p></I>Ralph Waldo Emerson, <I>Concord Hymn <p><p></I>Louise Erdrich, <I>The Strange People <p><p></I><B>New</B> Rhina Espaillat, <I>Translation <p><p></I><B>New</B> Gustavo P&#233;rez Firmat, <I>Turning the Times Tables <p><p></I><B>New</B> Mark Ford, <I>The Long Man <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>Birches <p><p></I>Robert Frost, <I>Design <p><p></I>Allen Ginsberg, <I>America <p><p></I>Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>All Hallows <p><p></I>Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>The Balcony <p><p></I><B>New</B> Louise Gl&#252;ck, <I>Midsummer <p><p></I><B>New</B> Albert Goldbarth, <I>The Novel That Asks to Erase Itself <p><p></I><B>New</B> Albert Goldbarth, <I>Unforeseeables <p><p></I>Jorie Graham, <I>Of Forced Sightes and Trusty Ferefulness <p><p></I>Jorie Graham, <I>Soul Says <p><p></I><B>New </B>Jorie Graham, <I>The Strangers <p><p></I>Thomas Gray, <I>Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard <p><p></I>Thom Gunn, <I>The Man with Night Sweats <p><p></I>Thom Gunn, <I>My Sad Captains <p><p></I>H.D., <I>Helen <p><p></I>Thomas Hardy, <I>Afterwards <p><p></I>Michael S. Harper, <I>Nightmare Begins Responsibility <p><p></I>Michael S. Harper, <I>We Assume&#58; On the Death of Our Son, Reuben Masai Harper <p><p></I>Robert Hayden, <I>Frederick Douglass <p><p></I>Robert Hayden, <I>Mourning Poem for the Queen of Sunday <p><p></I><B>New</B> Terrance Hayes, <I>WOOFER (When I Consider the African-American) <p><p></I><B>New </B>Terrance Hayes, <I>A Small Novel <p><p></I>Seamus Heaney, <I>Bogland <p><p></I>Seamus Heaney, <I>Punishment <p><p></I>George Herbert, <I>The Collar <p><p></I>George Herbert, <I>Redemption <p><p></I>Robert Herrick, <I>Corinna's Going A-Maying <p><p></I>Gerard Manley Hopkins, <I>God's Grandeur</I> <p><p>Gerard Manley Hopkins, <I>No worst, there is none. Pitched past pitch of grief <p><p></I><B>New</B> John Hollander, <I>By Nature <p><p></I>A.E. Housman, <I>Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now <p><p></I>A.E. Housman, <I>With Rue My Heart Is Laden <p><p></I><B>New</B> Langston Hughes, <I>Dream Variation <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>Harlem</I> <p><p>Langston Hughes, <I>I, Too <p><p></I>Langston Hughes, <I>The Weary Blues <p><p></I>Ben Jonson, <I>Come,</I> <I>My Celia <p><p></I><B>New</B> Laura Kasischke, <I>Miss Consolation for Emotional Damages <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>In drear nighted December <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>La Belle Dame Sans Merci <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again <p><p></I>John Keats, <I>This Living Hand <p><p></I><B>New</B> Jane Kenyon, <I>Back <p><p></I><B>New</B> Jane Kenyon, <I>Otherwise <p><p></I>Jane Kenyon, <I>Surprise <p><p></I>Etheridge Knight, <I>A Poem for Myself (Or Blues for a Mississippi Black Boy) <p><p></I>Kenneth Koch, <I>Variations on a Theme by William Carlos Williams <p><p></I>Yusef Komunyakaa, <I>Boat People <p><p></I>Yusef Komunyakaa, <I>My Father's Loveletters <p><p></I><B>New</B> Yusef Komunyakaa, <I>The Towers <p><p></I>Stanley Kunitz, <I>The Portrait <p><p></I>Philip Larkin, <I>High Windows <p><p></I>Philip Larkin, <I>Reasons for Attendance <p><p></I>Philip Larkin, <I>This Be the Verse <p><p></I>D.H. Lawrence, <I>The English Are So Nice! <p><p></I><B>New </B>Inada Lawson, <I>XI. Japs <p><p></I><B>New</B> Li-Young Lee, <I>Mother Deluxe <p><p></I>Denise Levertov, <I>The Ache of Marriage <p><p></I>Harold Littlebird, <I>White-Washing the Walls <p><p></I>Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, <I>Aftermath <p><p></I>Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, <I>The Jewish Cemetery at Newport <p><p></I>Audre Lorde, <I>Hanging Fire <p><p></I>Robert Lowell, <I>Sailing Home from Rapallo <p><p></I>Archibald MacLeish, <I>Ars Poetica <p><p></I><B>New</B> Victor Mart&#237;nez, <I>The Ledger <p><p></I><B>New</B> Andrew Marvell, <I>The Definition of Love <p><p></I>Andrew Marvell, <I>The Mower&#8217;s Song <p><p></I>Andrew Marvell, <I>The Mower to the Glowworms <p><p></I>Andrew Marvell, <I>To His Coy Mistress <p><p></I><B>New</B> Shara McCallum, <I>The Incident <p><p></I>Herman Melville, <I>The Berg <p><p></I>Herman Melville, <I>Monody <p><p></I><B>New </B>James Merrill, <I>The Christmas Tree <p><p></I>W.S. Merwin,<I> For a Coming Extinction <p><p></I>W.S. Merwin, <I>For the Anniversary of My Death <p><p></I>John Milton, <I>L'Allegro <p><p></I>John Milton, <I>Methought I Saw My Late Espous&#232;d Saint <p><p></I>John Milton, <I>On Shakespeare <p><p></I><B>New</B> Marianne Moore, <I>A Grave <p><p></I><B>New</B> Marianne Moore, <I>England <p><p></I>Marianne Moore, <I>Poetry <p><p></I>Marianne Moore, <I>The Steeple-Jack <p><p></I>Pat Mora, <I>La Migra <p><p></I><B>New</B> Pat Mora, <I>Rituals <p><p></I><B>New</B> Thylias Moss, <I>One for All Newborns <p><p></I><B>New</B> Harryette Mullen, <I>Omnivore <p><p></I>Frank O'Hara, <I>Ave Maria <p><p></I>Frank O'Hara, <I>Why I Am Not a Painter <p><p></I>Wilfred Owen, <I>Anthem for Doomed Youth <p><p></I>Wilfred Owen, <I>Disabled <p><p></I><B>New</B> Grace Paley, from <I>Detour <p><p></I><B>New</B> Carl Phillips, <I>Blue <p><p></I>Carl Phillips, <I>The Kill <p><p></I>Carl Phillips, <I>Passing</I> <p><p>Sylvia Plath, <I>Edge <p><p></I>Sylvia Plath, <I>Lady Lazarus <p><p></I>Sylvia Plath, <I>Morning</I> <I>Song <p><p></I>Edgar Allan Poe, <I>Annabel Lee <p><p></I>Alexander Pope, <I>from</I> An Essay on Man (Epistle 1) <p><p>Ezra Pound, <I>In a Station of the Metro <p><p></I><B>New</B> D.A. Powell, <I>[autumn set us heavily to task&#58; unrooted the dahlias] <p><p></I><B>New</B> D.A. Powell, <I>[cherry elixir&#58; the first medication. so mary poppins] <p><p></I>Sir Walter Ralegh, <I>The Lie <p><p></I><B>New</B> Srikanth Reddy, <I>Fourth Circle <p><p></I>Adrienne Rich, <I>Diving into the Wreck <p><p></I><B>New</B> Adrienne Rich, <I>I Am in Danger&#8212;Sir-- <p><p></I>Adrienne Rich, <I>The Middle-Aged <p><p></I>Alberto R&#237;os,<I> Teodoro Luna's Two Kisses <p><p></I>Edwin Arlington Robinson, <I>Richard Cory <p><p></I>Theodore Roethke, <I>Elegy for Jane <p><p></I>Theodore Roethke, <I>The Waking <p><p></I><B>New</B> Aleida Rodr&#237;quez, <I>Lexicon of Exile <p><p></I><B>New</B> Noelle Brynn Saito, <I>Turkey People <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Fear No More the Heat o' the Sun <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Full Fathom Five <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 18 (Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?) <p><p></I>William Shakespeare, <I>Sonnet 116 (Let me not to the marriage of true minds) <p><p></I>Percy Bysshe Shelley, <I>Ode to the West Wind <p><p></I>Percy Bysshe Shelley, <I>Ozymandias <p><p></I>Sir Philip Sidney, from <I>Astrophel and Stella <p><p></I><I>1 (Loving in Truth) <p><p></I><I>31 (With how sad steps) <p><p></I>Charles Simic, <I>Charon's Cosmology <p><p></I>Charles Simic, <I>Fork</I> <p><p><B>New</B> Charles Simic, <I>A Suitcase Strapped with a Rope <p><p></I>Christopher Smart, <I>From Jubilate Agno <p><p></I>Christopher Smart, <I>On a Bed of Guernsey Lilies <p><p></I>Dave Smith, <I>On a Field Trip at Fredericksburg <p><p></I><B>New</B> Ron Smith, <I>The Teachers Pass the Popcorn <p><p></I>Stevie Smith, <I>Not Waving But Drowning</I> <p><p><B>New</B> Tracy K. Smith, <I>El Mar <p><p></I><B>New</B> Tracy K. Smith, <I>Credulity <p><p></I>Gary Snyder, <I>Axe Handles <p><p></I>Gary Snyder, <I>How Poetry Comes to Me <p><p></I><B>New</B> Edmund Spenser, <I>A Hymne in Honour of Love <p><p></I>Edmund Spenser, <I>Sonnet 75 (One day I wrote her name upon the strand) <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Idea of Order at Key West <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Planet on the Table <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>The Snow Man <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>Sunday Morning <p><p></I>Wallace Stevens, <I>Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird <p><p></I>Mark Strand, <I>Keeping Things Whole <p><p></I><B>New</B> Adrienne Su, <I>The English Canon <p><p></I><B>New</B> May Swenson, <I>Untitled <p><p></I><B>New</B> May Swenson, <I>I Look at My Hand <p><p></I><B>New</B> May Swenson, <I>How Everything Happens <p><p></I>Alfred, Lord Tennyson, from <I>In Memoriam A.H.H. <p><p></I><I>7 (Dark house) <p><p>99 (Risest thou thus) <p><p>106 (Ring out, wild bells) <p><p>12 (Sad Hesper o'er the buried sun) <p><p></I>Alfred, Lord Tennyson, <I>Tears, Idle Tears <p><p></I>Alfred, Lord Tennyson, <I>Ulysses <p><p></I>Dylan Thomas, <I>Fern Hill <p><p></I>Dylan Thomas, <I>In My Craft or Sullen Art <p><p></I><B>New</B> Natasha Trethewey, <I>What is Evidence <p><p></I>Henry Vaughan, <I>They Are All Gone into the World of Light! <p><p></I>Derek Walcott, <I>Blues <p><p></I>Derek Walcott, <I>God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen <p><p></I><B>New</B> Derek Walcott, <I>Perhaps it exists&#8230;. <p><p></I>Rosanna Warren, <I>In</I> <I>Creve Coeur, Missouri <p><p></I><B>New </B>Joshua Weiner, <I>The Yonder Tree <p><p></I><B>New</B> James Welch, <I>Getting Things Straight <p><p></I>James Welch, <I>Harlem, Montana&#58; Just Off the Reservation <p><p></I><B>New</B> Phillis Wheatley, <I>To S.M. a young African Painter, on seeing his Works <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>A Hand-Mirror <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, from <I>Song of Myself <p><p></I><I>1. (I celebrate myself) <p><p>6 (A child said, What is the grass?) <p><p>52 (The spotted hawk) <p><p></I>Walt Whitman, <I>Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night <p><p></I>Richard Wilbur, <I>Cottage Street, 1953 <p><p></I>Richard Wilbur, <I>The Writer <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>Landscape with the Fall of Icarus <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>The</I> <I>Raper from Passenack <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>Spring and All <p><p></I>William Carlos Williams, <I>This Is Just to Say <p><p></I>William Wordsworth, <I>My Heart Leaps Up <p><p></I>William Wordsworth, <I>Ode&#58; Intimations of Immortality <p><p></I>William Wordsworth, <I>The Solitary Reaper <p><p></I>James Wright, <I>A Blessing <p><p></I>James Wright, <I>Small Frogs Killed on the Highway <p><p></I>Sir Thomas Wyatt, <I>Forget Not Yet <p><p></I><B>New</B> John Yau, <I>Autobiography in Red and Yello <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>Among School Children <p><p></I><B>New</B> William Butler Yeats, <I>A Dialogue Between Self and Soul <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>Down by the Salley Gardens <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>The Lake Isle of Innisfree</I> <p><p>William Butler Yeats, <I>Leda and the Swan <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>Sailing to Byzantium <p><p></I>William Butler Yeats, <I>The Second Coming <p><p></I><p><p>Appendices <p><p>On Prosody <p><p>On Grammar <p><p>On Speech Acts <p><p>On Rhetorical Devices <p><p>On Lyric Subgenres <p><p><p>Index of Authors, Titles, and First Lines <p><p>Index of Terms [Endpapers]<p>
57The Poets Laureate AnthologyElizabeth Hun Schmidt0<p><b>Elizabeth Hun Schmidt</b>, a former poetry editor at the <b>New York Times Book Review</b>, is the editor of the acclaimed anthology <b>Poems of New York</b> and <b>The Poets Laureate Anthology</b>. She lives in New York City and currently teaches American literature at Sarah Lawrence College.<P><b>Billy Collins</b> was a Poet Laureate of the United States.</p>Elizabeth Hun Schmidt, Library of Congress Staff (With), Billy Collinsthe-poets-laureate-anthologyelizabeth-hun-schmidt97803930618190393061817$38.52HardcoverNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.October 2010New EditionPoetry, American Literature Anthologies, Anthologies8166.50 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.70 (d)<p class="null1">The first anthology to gather poems by the forty-three poets laureate of the United States.</p> <p>As a record of poetry, <b>The Poets Laureate Anthology</b> is groundbreaking, charting the course of American poetry over the last seventy-five years, while being, at the same time, a pleasure to read, full of some of the world’s best-known poems and many new surprises. Elizabeth Hun Schmidt has gathered and introduced poems by each of the forty-three poets who have been named our nation’s poets laureate since the post (originally called Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress) was established in 1937. Poets range from Robert Pinsky, William Carlos Williams, and Elizabeth Bishop to Charles Simic, Billy Collins, and Rita Dove. Schmidt’s spirited introductions place the poets and their poems in historical and literary context and shine light on the interesting and often uneasy relationship between politics and art. This is an inviting, monumental collection for everyone’s library, containing much of the best poetry written in America over the last century.</p><p>The first anthology to gather poems by the forty-three poets laureate of the United States.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>The United States has a long tradition of choosing a national poet, though the term poet laureate only came to be used here after 1985. Before that, since its inception in 1935, the post was called consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress. So far we've had 43 of them, including some of America's most famous and best-loved poets, such as Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, and, of course, Billy Collins, perhaps the most popular poet to hold the title (2001 2003), and also the author of the foreword to this enjoyable anthology, which offers a sampling of work from all 43 laureates, plus short introductions about each one. Former New York Times Book Review poetry editor Schmidt calls the laureates "the gatekeepers of the American idiom," and above all, that's what a reader will find here&#58; a good sampling of what the mainstream of American poetry has to offer--the careful descriptions of Bishop, the powerful critiques of Brooks, the surreal landscapes of Simic, Merwin's deep images, Bogan's careful stanzas, Lowell's blustery lines. There are a few occasional poems, but mostly, it's a gathering of great poets hanging together because they held an important job. This will be a wonderful holiday gift for poetry lovers. (Oct.)</p><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4>The United States has a long tradition of choosing a national poet, though the term poet laureate only came to be used here after 1985. Before that, since its inception in 1935, the post was called consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress. So far we've had 43 of them, including some of America's most famous and best-loved poets, such as Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, and, of course, Billy Collins, perhaps the most popular poet to hold the title (2001–2003), and also the author of the foreword to this enjoyable anthology, which offers a sampling of work from all 43 laureates, plus short introductions about each one. Former New York Times Book Review poetry editor Schmidt calls the laureates "the gatekeepers of the American idiom," and above all, that's what a reader will find here: a good sampling of what the mainstream of American poetry has to offer--the careful descriptions of Bishop, the powerful critiques of Brooks, the surreal landscapes of Simic, Merwin's deep images, Bogan's careful stanzas, Lowell's blustery lines. There are a few occasional poems, but mostly, it's a gathering of great poets hanging together because they held an important job. This will be a wonderful holiday gift for poetry lovers. (Oct.) </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>"Be careful what you say to us now./ The street-lamp is smashed, the window is jagged,/ There is a man dead in his blood by the base of the fountain./ If you speak/ You cannot be delicate or sad or clever." With these lines, Josephine Jacobsen reminds readers that despite all the hardship in the world, poetry is there to report. With this sweeping behemoth of an anthology, Norton and the Library of Congress have given readers and libraries an excellent excuse to own another book. Schmidt, former poetry editor for the New York Times Book Review, has included all of the Poet Laureate Consultants (commonly known as U.S. Poet Laureates) from Joseph Auslander (1937–41) to Kay Ryan (2007–10). Even newly named Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin is included because he served as Special Bicentennial Consultant with Rita Dove and Louise Glück (1999–2000). Schmidt gives readers a fine selection of poems for each poet, some expected and some surprises. In addition, she includes introductions that place poets in social and literary context and elaborates their contributions to the office of Consultant. For example, William Carlos Williams's term was mired in Communist controversy and health problems, and while appointed, he never served. VERDICT A hefty and worthy read that everyone will want to savor. Essential for all contemporary poetry collections.—Karla Huston, Appleton Arts Ctr., WI </article>
58The Portable Beat ReaderVarious0<p><P>Ann Charters is the editor of <i>The Portable Sixties Reader</i>, <i>The Portable Jack Kerouac</i>, two volumes of Jack Kerouac's <i>Selected Letters</i>, and <i>Beat Down to Your Soul</i>. She teaches at the University of Connecticut.</p>Various, Ann Chartersthe-portable-beat-readervarious97801424375370142437530$18.00PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)July 2003ReissueLiterary Collections, American<p><P>Through poetry, fiction, essays, song lyrics, letters, and memoirs, this authoritative single-volume collection of Beat literature captures the triumphant energy of a movement that swept through American letters with hurricane force. <P>Featuring&#58; Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Neal Cassady, Gregory Corso, Diane Di Prima, Bob Dylan, Ken Kesey, Charles Bukowski, Michael McClure, and more.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>Cutting through bohemian posturing and excess, Charters here reprints much of the most vital, readable and relevant material produced by the Beat generation, primarily in the 1950s and '60s, with some selections from the '70s and '80s. The novels of such leading figures as Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs lend themselves well to excerpting, giving this volume creditable ballast. Representative works of Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Gary Snyder are included along with those of lesser-known Beats (e.g., John Clellon Holmes), fellow travelers like Frank O'Hara and Amiri Baraka, and wives and girlfriends often overlooked at the time, including Hettie Jones, Carolyn Cassady and Joyce Johnson. Charters ( Kerouac ) offers a broad perspective on this seminal literary movement: she links East Coast Beats to the San Francisco Renaissance poets; pays attention to such latter-day Beats as Ed Sanders and Tuli Kupferberg; and explains the position of non-Beat but related writers--Alan Watts, Anne Waldman, Diane DiPrima and the young Norman Mailer--in her helpful introductory essay and notes preceeding each entry. Her energizing, liberating anthology makes it clear that such Beat preoccupations as the bomb, the meaninglessness of modern existence and ecological destruction remain current. ( Jan. )</p>
59The Best American Short Plays 2008-2009Barbara Parisi0Barbara Parisithe-best-american-short-plays-2008-2009barbara-parisi97815578376081557837600$14.85PaperbackApplause Theatre Book PublishersOctober 2010Drama Anthologies, American Drama, American Literature Anthologies3565.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.10 (d)<p>This edition of the highly esteemed and long-enduring Best American Short Plays series contains fresh-voiced, cutting-edge plays by nineteen playwrights, both established and among the most promising of the new millennium. Each of these plays reflects the enormous diversity of contemporary American theatre.</p><p><P>Applause is proud to continue the series that for over 70 years has been the standard of excellence for one-act plays in America. From its inception, The Best American Short Plays has identified new, cutting-edge playwrights who have gone on to establish award-winning careers, including Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Wendy Wasserstein, Terrence McNally, and David Mamet. The complex and diverse plays that make up this collection reflect both personal concerns and social issues. The 2008-2009 edition includes A Second of Pleasure, by Neil LaBute; St. Francis Preaches to the Birds, by David Ives; The Stormy Waters, The Long Way Home, by Carey Lovelace; Early Morning, by Eric Lane; Sisters, by Adam Kraar, Maria Filimon, and Tasnim Mansur; Little Duck, by Billy Aronson; A Portrait of the Woman as a Young Artist, by Meg Miroshnik; Slapped Actress, by Emily Conbere; The Last Artist in NYC, by Polly Frost and Ray Sawhill; THE TRUE AUTHOR of the plays formerly attributed to Mister William Shakespeare REVEALED to the world for the first time by Miss Delia Bacon, by James Armstrong; The Lovers and Others of Eugene O'Neill, by Marla Del Collins; III, by Joe Salvatore; Pete and Joe at the Dew Drop Inn, by Lewis Gardner; This Is Your Lifetime, by Jill Elaine Hughes; Decades Apart, by Rick Pulos; Never Spoke Again, by Barbara Parisi-Pasternack; 508, by Amy Herzog; Ella, by Dano Madden; and Naked Old Man, by Murray Schisgal.</p><p>Foreword: A Simple, Brilliant Idea David Ives ix</p> <p>Introduction Barbara Parisi xiii</p> <p>A Second of Pleasure Neil LaBute 1</p> <p>St. Francis Preaches to the Birds David Ives 17</p> <p>The Stormy Waters, the Long Way Home Carey Lovelace 41</p> <p>Early Morning Eric Lane 49</p> <p>Sisters Adam Kraar Maria Filimon Tasnim Mansur 81</p> <p>Little Duck Billy Aronson 89</p> <p>A Portrait of the Woman as a Young Artist Meg Miroshnik 113</p> <p>Slapped Actress Emily Conbere 153</p> <p>The Last Artist in New York City Polly Frost Ray Sawhill 163</p> <p>The True Author of the Plays Formerly Attributed to Mister William Shakespeare Revealed to the World for the First Time by Miss Delia Bacon James Armstrong 179</p> <p>The Lovers and Others of Eugene O'Neill Maria Del Collins 191</p> <p>III Joe Salvatore 217</p> <p>Pete and Joe at the Dew Drop Inn Lewis Gardner 271</p> <p>Decades Apart: Reflections of Three Gay Men Rick Pulos 285</p> <p>508 Amy Herzog 313</p> <p>Naked Old Man Murray Schisgal 325</p> <p>Acknowledgments 351</p>
60The Gift of LoveLori Foster0<p><P><b>Lori Foster</b> is the <i>New York Times</i> and <i>USA Today</i> bestselling author of many contemporary romances, including <i>My Man Michael</i> (2/09). She lives in Ohio.</p>Lori Foster, Gia Dawn, Ann Christopher, Lisa Cooke, Heidi Bettsthe-gift-of-lovelori-foster97804252342800425234282$14.43PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)June 2010Short Story Anthologies, Family & Friendship - Fiction, American Literature Anthologies3685.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)<p><b>Edited by <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Lori Foster-a heartwarming anthology of all-new stories that celebrate family love.</b></p> <p>Families come in many configurations, and every one is unique, made up of the personalities of each member. But the love that connects families is universal. Whether it is the love of parents for their children, the love between a husband and wife, the love between siblings, a love that transcends generations, or even the love for a family member never met, the family ties that bind us are the strongest and deepest emotional connections we experience. Families influence a person's development, how they treat others, and how they view life. In <i>The Gift of Love</i>, eight exceptional writers offer a variety of unique perspectives on what family love means and how it impacts our lives in ways profound and often surprising.</p> <p>Featuring:</p> <p>Lori Foster ? Heidi Betts ? Jules Bennett ? Ann Christopher ? Lisa Cooke ? Paige Cuccaro ? Gia Dawn ? Helen Kay Dimon</p><p><P><b>Edited by <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Lori Foster-a heartwarming anthology of all-new stories that celebrate family love. </b> <P>Families come in many configurations, and every one is unique, made up of the personalities of each member. But the love that connects families is universal. Whether it is the love of parents for their children, the love between a husband and wife, the love between siblings, a love that transcends generations, or even the love for a family member never met, the family ties that bind us are the strongest and deepest emotional connections we experience. Families influence a person's development, how they treat others, and how they view life. In <i>The Gift of Love</i>, eight exceptional writers offer a variety of unique perspectives on what family love means and how it impacts our lives in ways profound and often surprising.<P>Featuring&#58; <P>Lori Foster &bull; Heidi Betts &bull; Jules Bennett &bull; Ann Christopher &bull; Lisa Cooke &bull; Paige Cuccaro &bull; Gia Dawn &bull; Helen Kay Dimon</p>
61One Hundred and One Famous Poems (Barnes &amp; Noble Library of Essential Reading)Roy J. Cook0Roy J. Cookone-hundred-and-one-famous-poemsroy-j-cook97814351147601435114760$8.95PaperbackBarnes & NobleFebruary 2009Literary Collections<p>This treasury of beloved poems collects all your favorite poets in one book. Whether you&#8217;re looking for a love poem or something to mend a broken heart, perhaps you&#8217;re feeling patriotic or struggling to understand the nature of man, the timeless words of Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, John Milton, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti are at your fingertips. <p>From the Romantic poets like Percy Bysshe Shelley and John Keats to the Transcendentalists like Ralph Waldo Emerson, this comprehensive collection contains examples of the many periods of writing from England to Scotland and on to the United States.<p>Included are such favorites as&#58;<p>Walt Whitman&#8217;s <I>O Captain! My Captain!</I><p>Eugene Field&#8217;s <I>Little Boy Blue</I><p>Percy Bysshe Shelley&#8217;s <I>To a Skylark</I><p>Joyce Kilmer&#8217;s <I>Trees</I><p>Robert Burns&#8217; <I>Letter to a Young Friend</I><p>Henry Wadsworth Longfellow&#8217;s <I>Paul Revere&#8217;s Ride</I><p>Edgar Allan Poe&#8217;s <I>The Raven</I><p>Three indices let you find your favorite poems by title, author, and first line. <p></p>
62The Vintage Book of Contemporary American PoetryJ. D. McClatchy0<p><P>J. D. McClatchy is the author of five collections of poems&#58; <b>Scenes From Another Life, Stars Principal, The Rest of the Way, Ten Commandments,</b> and <b>Hazmat</b><i>.</i> He has also written two books of essays&#58; <b>White Paper</b> and <b>Twenty Questions</b>. He has edited many other books, including <b>The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry, Poets on Painters</b><i>,</i> and <b>Horace&#58; The Odes</b>. In addition, he edits The Voice of the Poet series for Random House AudioBooks, and has written seven opera libretti. He is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has taught at Princeton, UCLA, and Johns Hopkins, and is now a professor at Yale, where since 1991 he has edited The Yale Review. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut.</p>J. D. McClatchythe-vintage-book-of-contemporary-american-poetryj-d-mcclatchy97814000309341400030935$13.65PaperbackKnopf Doubleday Publishing GroupApril 2003RevisedPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies6565.20 (w) x 7.99 (h) x 1.16 (d)<p>Dazzling in its range, exhilarating in its immediacy and grace, this collection gathers together, from every region of the country and from the past forty years, the poems that continue to shape our imaginations. From Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop, John Ashbery and Adrienne Rich, to Robert Haas and Louise Gluck, this anthology takes the full measure of our poetry's daring energies and its tender understandings.</p><p><P>Dazzling in its range, exhilarating in its immediacy and grace, this collection gathers together, from every region of the country and from the past forty years, the poems that continue to shape our imaginations. From Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop, John Ashbery and Adrienne Rich, to Robert Haas and Louise Gluck, this anthology takes the full measure of our poetry's daring energies and its tender understandings.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>Poetry devotees will be familiar with much of the work in this fine collection, which focuses on the period from WW II until the present. Sixty-five poets, including such well-known writers as Robert Lowell, Allen Ginsberg, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, James Dickey, Denise Levertov and Gary Snyder, are represented by anywhere from one to a dozen poems each, as well as a brief biography that touches on the writer's aesthetic ideas. McClatchy, himself a poet and critic, has done an exceptional job of selecting works that typify the poets' styles and beliefs. Standouts are Elizabeth Bishop's ``In the Waiting Room,'' about the poet's first perception of herself in relation to others; Randall Jarrell's ``The Woman at the Washington Zoo,'' which deals with the dull, emotionless routine of modern life; Frank O'Hara's ``Having a Coke with You,'' a dizzy declaration of love during a visit to a New York museum; and Mark Strand's ``Keeping Things Whole,'' in which the poet sees his presence in the world as subtracting from the whole of reality. Unfortunately, the poems are not dated, giving the reader no sense of the writers' chronological development. (Nov.)</p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Note on the Second Edition, 2003</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">3</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Memories of West Street and Lepke</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">8</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Man and Wife</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">9</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Skunk Hour</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">10</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Mouth of the Hudson</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">12</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For the Union Dead</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">13</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Waking Early Sunday Morning</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">15</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">History</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">18</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Nihilist as Hero</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">18</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Reading Myself</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Obit</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fishnet</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">20</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dolphin</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">20</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Epilogue</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">21</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Bight</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">22</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Over 2,000 Illustrations and a Complete Concordance</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">At the Fishhouses</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">25</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Shampoo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">28</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Brazil, January 1, 1502</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">28</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Under the Window: Ouro Preto</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">30</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Armadillo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">32</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Filling Station</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">33</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the Waiting Room</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">34</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">One Art</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">37</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Poem</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">38</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cuttings</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">40</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Root Cellar</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">41</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Shape of the Fire</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">41</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Waking</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">44</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Knew a Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">45</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In a Dark Time</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">46</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Moon and the Night and the Men</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">47</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From the Dream Songs (1, 4, 5, 14, 29, 46, 76, 77, 143, 257, 384)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">48</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">90 North</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">56</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Eighth Air Force</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">58</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Woman at the Washington Zoo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">58</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cinderella</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Next Day</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">60</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Well Water</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">62</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Masts at Dawn</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">63</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Birth of Love</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">65</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rattlesnake Country</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">66</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Evening Hawk</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">72</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Kingfishers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">73</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For My Contemporaries</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">80</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">To My Wife</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">81</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From a Century of Epigrams 9 (29, 53, 55, 62, 76)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">81</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Night, Death, Mississippi</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">83</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Frederick Douglass</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Middle Passage</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Amsterdam Letter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">91</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cracked Looking Glass</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">93</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">After Reading The Country of the Pointed Firs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">94</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Teleology</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Unconscious Came a Beauty</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">98</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Stone Gullets</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Staying at Ed's Place</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Strawberrying</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">100</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Poem Beginning With a Line by Pindar</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">101</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Styx</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">109</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Illiterate</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">111</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Thoughts on One's Head</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">112</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Consequences</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">113</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Country Stars</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">115</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Jain Bird Hospital in Delhi</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">115</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Storm Windows</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">117</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Writing</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">118</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Money</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">119</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Dependencies</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">120</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Learning the Trees</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">121</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Because You Asked About the Line Between Prose and Poetry</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">122</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The War in the Air</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">123</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Baroque Wall-Foundation in the Villa Sciarra</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">124</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Looking Into History</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">126</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Love Calls Us to the Things of This World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">128</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mind</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">129</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Advice to a Prophet</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">130</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Walking to Sleep</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">131</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hamlen Brook</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">135</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Homework</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">136</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Into Mexico</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">137</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Twins</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">138</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A View</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">139</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Stream</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">141</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Pruned Tree</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">145</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Wars</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">146</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Menage a Trois</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">147</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Elegy for My Sister</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">149</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rules of Sleep</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">152</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Einstein's Bathrobe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">153</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Heaven of Animals</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">155</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Hospital Window</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">156</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Sheep Child</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">158</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Strength of Fields</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">160</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Hill</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">162</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Third Avenue in Sunlight</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">163</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"More Light! More Light!"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">164</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Peripeteia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Feast of Stephen</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">168</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Crystal Lithium</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">170</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Shimmer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">175</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Korean Mums</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">176</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Clouds</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">178</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Ache of Marriage</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">179</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Intrusion</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">180</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Seeing for a Moment</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">180</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Prisoners</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">181</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Graves at Elkhorn</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">183</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Lady in Kicking Horse Reservoir</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">184</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Degrees of Gray in Philipsburg</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">186</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The River Now</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">187</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Afternoon at the Beach</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">188</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Amor Vincit Omnia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Autumn Shade (3, 6, 8, 9)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">189</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Muse of Water</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">192</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Amusing Our Daughters</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">194</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Pro Feminia (I, II)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">195</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Evening of the Mind</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">198</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Men at Forty</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">199</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Tourist from Syracuse</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">200</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Variations on a Text by Vallejo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">201</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Assassination</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">202</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mule Team and Poster</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">202</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">To the Harbormaster</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">204</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Step Away from Them</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">205</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Meditations in an Emergency</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">206</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Why I Am Not a Painter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Day Lady Died</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Having a Coke With You</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">209</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ave Maria</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">211</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Best Slow Dancer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">212</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Naval Trainees Learn How to Jump Overboard</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">213</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Excursion of the Speech and Hearing Class</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">214</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Five Dawn Skies in November</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">215</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Making Camp</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">215</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Source</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">216</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Know a Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">218</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Rescue</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">219</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Air: "The Love of a Woman"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">219</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For Friendship</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">220</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For Love</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">220</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Again</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">222</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">223</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Howl (I)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">225</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sunflower Sutra</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">229</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Sad Self</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">231</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Wales Visitation</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">233</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">April Inventory</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">237</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Heart's Needle (2, 6)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">239</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mementos, 1</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">241</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Locked House</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">242</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Renewal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">244</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Voices from the Other World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">245</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Days of 1964</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">246</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Willowware Cup</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">248</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lost in Translation</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">249</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Animals</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">256</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Some Last Questions</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">257</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The River of Bees</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">257</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For the Anniversary of My Death</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">258</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Asians Dying</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">259</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For a Coming Extinction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">260</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Night of the Shirts</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">261</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bread</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">261</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">St. Vincent's</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">262</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">He Held Radical Light</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">265</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Gravelly Run</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">266</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Corsons Inlet</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">267</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Reflective</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">271</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Terrain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">271</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The City Limits</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">272</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Glazunoviana</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">274</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Soonest Mended</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">275</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">As One Put Drunk Into the Packet-Boat</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">277</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pyrography</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">278</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">And Ut Pictura Poesis Is Her Name</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">281</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Syringa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">282</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Erotic Double</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">284</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">At the Executed Murderer's Grave</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">286</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">289</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy's Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">290</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Beginning</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">290</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Blessing</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">291</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In Response to a Rumor That the Oldest Whorehouse in Wheeling, West Virginia, Has Been Condemned</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">292</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Winter Daybreak Above Vence</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">293</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Vapor Trail Reflected in the Frog Pond</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">295</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Last Songs</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">296</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Bear</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">297</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">After Making Love We Hear Footsteps</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">300</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Man Splitting Wood in the Daybreak</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">301</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Vow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">302</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Man on the Hotel Room Bed</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">302</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Her Kind</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">304</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Music Swims Back to Me</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">305</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Truth the Dead Know</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">306</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Starry Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">With Mercy for the Greedy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Wanting to Die</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">308</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Room of My Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">310</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Horse</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">311</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">They Feed They Lion</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">313</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Belle Isle, 1949</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">314</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">You Can Have It</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">314</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rain Downriver</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">316</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sweet Will</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">317</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Family History</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">320</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Dream</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">324</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From All of Us Here</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">325</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Night Mirror</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">328</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From Powers of Thirteen (3, 29, 69, 82, 87, 130)</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">329</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Swan and Shadow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">333</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Mad Potter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">334</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Venetian Interior, 1889</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">338</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">At the Monument to Pierre Louys</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">342</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">345</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Planetarium</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">349</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Burning of Paper Instead of Children</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">351</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Paula Becker to Clara Westhoff</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">354</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For the Record</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">357</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For an Album</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">358</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mid-August at Sourdough Mountain Lookout</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">359</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Riprap</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">360</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Burning Island</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">361</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Bath</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">362</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Went Into the Maverick Bar</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">365</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Axe Handles</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">366</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Colossus</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">368</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Hanging Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">369</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Morning Song</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">370</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Daddy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">370</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fever 103[degree]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">373</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ariel</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">375</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lady Lazarus</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">376</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Edge</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">378</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Words</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">379</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Keeping Things Whole</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">381</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Coming to This</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">382</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Prediction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">382</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"The Dreadful Has Already Happened"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">383</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly - <span class="author">Publisher's Weekly</span> </h4>Poetry devotees will be familiar with much of the work in this fine collection, which focuses on the period from WW II until the present. Sixty-five poets, including such well-known writers as Robert Lowell, Allen Ginsberg, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, James Dickey, Denise Levertov and Gary Snyder, are represented by anywhere from one to a dozen poems each, as well as a brief biography that touches on the writer's aesthetic ideas. McClatchy, himself a poet and critic, has done an exceptional job of selecting works that typify the poets' styles and beliefs. Standouts are Elizabeth Bishop's ``In the Waiting Room,'' about the poet's first perception of herself in relation to others; Randall Jarrell's ``The Woman at the Washington Zoo,'' which deals with the dull, emotionless routine of modern life; Frank O'Hara's ``Having a Coke with You,'' a dizzy declaration of love during a visit to a New York museum; and Mark Strand's ``Keeping Things Whole,'' in which the poet sees his presence in the world as subtracting from the whole of reality. Unfortunately, the poems are not dated, giving the reader no sense of the writers' chronological development. (Nov.) </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>Alluding to the anthology wars of a generation ago, McClatchy writes in his introduction that his choices are strictly nonpartisan (neither ``Paleface or Redskin, or Academic and Avant-Garde''). But from the 65 poets he has selected to represent the course of American poetry over the last half century--beginning with Robert Lowell and ending with Jorie Graham--it is clear his preferences are formalistic and academic. The typical poem a reader will encounter in these pages is urbane, finely honed, and smoothly accomplished. As in all anthologies, the omissions and inclusions are telling. Where are Rexroth, Kees, and Rukeyser? Why Cunningham, Bowers, Feldman, and Garrigue and not Ignatow, Brooks, Blackburn, and Bly? While it is a delight to have many of the poets McClatchy has chosen collected together in a reasonably priced edition, a greater variety of voice and aesthetic would have made this anthology a livelier survey of the state of contemporary American poetry. Still, it is a useful addition to most collections. For the 100 most anthologized poems in English, see review of The Concise Columbia Book of Poetry, p. 74.--Ed.-- Christine Sten strom, New York Law Sch. Lib. </article>
63Literature: A Pocket AnthologyR. S. Gwynn0R. S. Gwynnliteraturer-s-gwynn97802056551060205655106$46.67PaperbackLongmanJanuary 20094th EditionLiterary Collections<p><P>Always a good price with quality selections, the Fourth Edition of Gwynn&#39;s Literature&#58; A Pocket Anthology continues that tradition. Organized chronologically with a thematic appendix and streamlined apparatus, this anthology can be taylored to however the course is taught. Individual Fiction, Poetry, and Drama introductions provide an overview for reading and analyzing each genre, defining key terms in context. More than a third of the selections overall represent voices of women, people of color, and writers from cultures outside the United States, and a strong effort has been made to include work that reflects contemporary social questions and will stimulate classroom discussion. New poems, stories, and plays are among the changes to the Fourth Edition.</p><P>Introduction<p>Experience, Experiment, Expand&#58; Three Reasons to Study Literature<p>Fiction<p>Introduction to Fiction<p>The Telling of the Tale<p>The Short Story Genre<p>Reading and Analyzing Short Fiction<p>Nathanel Hawthorne (1804-1864)<p>* The Minister&rsquo;s Black Veil<p>Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)<p>&bull; Ligeia<p>Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909)<p>A White Heron<p>Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893)<p>Mother Savage<p>Kate Chopin (1851-1904)<p>The Story of an Hour<p>Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)<p>The Yellow Wallpaper<p>Edith Wharton (1862-1937)<p>Roman Fever<p>Willa Cather (1876-1947)<p>Paul&rsquo;s Case<p>James Joyce (1882-1941)<p>Araby<p>Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960)<p>Sweat<p>William Faulkner (1897-1962)<p>A Rose for Emily<p>Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)<p>&bull; Up in Michigan<p>John Steinbeck (1902-1968)<p>The Chrysanthemums<p>Richard Wright (1908-1960)<p>The Man Who Was Almost a Man<p>John Cheever (1912-1982)<p>Reunion<p>Ralph Ellison (1914-1995)<p>A Party Down at the Square<p>Shirley Jackson (1919-1965)<p>The Lottery<p>* Hisaye Yamamoto (b. 1921)<p>Seventeen Syllables<p>Flannery O&#39;Connor (1925-1964)<p>&bull; Everything That Rises Must Converge<p>Gabriel Garc&iacute;a M&aacute;rquez (b. 1928)<p>A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings<p>Chinua Achebe (b. 1930)<p>Dead Men&rsquo;s Path<p>Alice Munro (b. 1931)<p>&bull; The Bear Came Over the Mountain<p>Joyce Carol Oates (b. 1938)<p>Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?<p>Raymond Carver (1938-1988)<p>Cathedral<p>Margaret Atwood (b. 1939)<p>Happy Endings<p>Bobbie Ann Mason (b. 1940)<p>Shiloh<p>Alice Walker (b. 1944)<p>Everyday Use<p>* Tim O&rsquo;Brien<p>The Things They Carried<p>Tim Gautreaux (b. 1947)<p>Died and Gone to Vegas<p>Sandra Cisneros (b. 1954)<p>Woman Hollering Creek<p>Louise Erdrich (b. 1954)<p>The Red Convertible<p>Gish Jen (b. 1955)<p>In the American Society<p>Daniel Orozco (b. 1957)<p>Orientation<p>* Sherman Alexie<p>This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona<p>Poetry<p>Introduction to Poetry<p>An Anecdote&#58; Where Poetry Starts<p>Speaker, Listener, and Context<p>&ldquo;The Star-Spangled Banner&rdquo;<p>Lyric, Narrative, Dramatic<p>The Language of Poetry<p>Figurative Language<p>Allegory and Symbol<p>Tone of Voice<p>Repetition&#58; Sounds and Schemes<p>Meter and Rhythm<p>Free Verse and Open Form<p>Stanza Forms<p>Fixed Forms<p>Literary History and Poetic Conventions<p>Anonymous<p>Western Wind<p>Bonny Barbara Allan<p>Sir Patrick Spens<p>Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503?-1542)<p>They Flee from Me<p>Whoso List to Hunt<p>Edmund Spenser (1552-1599)<p>Amoretti&#58; Sonnet 75<p>Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)<p>Astrophel and Stella&#58; Sonnet 1<p>Robert Southwell (1561?-1595)<p>The Burning Babe<p>Michael Drayton (1563-1631)<p>Idea&#58; Sonnet 61<p>William Shakespeare (1564-1616)<p>Sonnet 18<p>Sonnet 20<p>Sonnet 29<p>Sonnet 73<p>Sonnet 116<p>Sonnet 130<p>When Daisies Pied (Spring and Winter)<p>Thomas Campion (1567-1620)<p>There Is a Garden in Her Face<p>John Donne (1572-1631)<p>The Flea<p>Holy Sonnet 10<p>Holy Sonnet 14<p>&bull; The Sun Rising<p>A Valediction&#58; Forbidding Mourning<p>Ben Jonson (1573-1637)<p>On My First Son<p>Slow, Slow, Fresh Fount<p>Mary Wroth (1587?-1651?)<p>In this Strange Labyrinth How Shall I Turn<p>Robert Herrick (1591-1674)<p>To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time<p>George Herbert (1593-1633)<p>Easter Wings<p>Love (III)<p>The Pulley<p>Redemption<p>Edmund Waller (1606-1687)<p>Song<p>John Milton (1608-1674)<p>How Soon Hath Time<p>On the Late Massacre in Piedmont<p>When I Consider How My Light Is Spent<p>Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672)<p>The Author to Her Book<p>Richard Lovelace (1618-1658)<p>To Lucasta, Going to the Wars<p>Andrew Marvell (1621-1678)<p>To His Coy Mistress<p>John Dryden (1631-1700)<p>To the Memory of Mr. Oldham<p>Edward Taylor (1642-1729)<p>Huswifery<p>Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)<p>A Description of a City Shower<p>Alexander Pope (1688-1744)<p>from An Essay on Criticism<p>Ode on Solitude<p>Thomas Gray (1716-1771)<p>Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard<p>William Blake (1757-1827)<p>The Chimney Sweeper<p>The Little Black Boy<p>A Poison Tree<p>The Tyger<p>Robert Burns (1759-1796)<p>A Red, Red Rose<p>John Barleycorn<p>William Wordsworth (1770-1850)<p>I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud<p>It Is a Beauteous Evening<p>Ode&#58; Intimations of Immortality<p>Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)<p>Frost at Midnight<p>Kubla Khan<p>Work Without Hope<p>George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824)<p>She Walks in Beauty<p>Stanzas<p>When We Two Parted<p>Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822)<p>Ode to the West Wind<p>Ozymandias<p>William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878)<p>To the Fringed Gentian<p>John Keats (1795-1821)<p>La Belle Dame sans Merci<p>Ode to a Nightingale<p>On First Looking into Chapman&#39;s Homer<p>When I Have Fears<p>Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861)<p>Sonnets from the Portuguese, 18<p>Sonnets from the Portuguese, 43<p>Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)<p>The Arsenal at Springfield<p>The Cross of Snow<p>Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)<p>The Haunted Palace<p>The Raven<p>* Sonnet to Science<p>Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)<p>The Lady of Shallot<p>Tears, Idle Tears<p>Ulysses<p>Robert Browning (1812-1889)<p>My Last Duchess<p>Porphyria&#39;s Lover<p>&bull; Prospice<p>Walt Whitman (1819-1892)<p>A Noiseless Patient Spider<p>O Captain, My Captain<p>&bull; A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Grey and Dim<p>Song of Myself, 6<p>Song of Myself, 11<p>When I Heard the Learn&#39;d Astronomer<p>Matthew Arnold (1822-1888)<p>Dover Beach<p>Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)<p>After Great Pain, a Formal Feeling Comes<p>Because I Could Not Stop for Death<p>The Brain Is Wider than the Sky<p>A Narrow Fellow in the Grass<p>Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church<p>The Soul Selects Her Own Society<p>Tell All the Truth but Tell It Slant<p>Wild Nights&#151;Wild Nights<p>Christina Rossetti (1830-1894)<p>Up-Hill<p>Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)<p>Ah, Are You Digging on My Grave?<p>* Chanel Firing<p>&bull; The Man He Killed<p>Neutral Tones<p>The Ruined Maid<p>Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889)<p>God&#39;s Grandeur<p>Pied Beauty<p>Spring and Fall&#58; To a Young Child<p>Emma Lazarus (1849-1887)<p>The New Colossus<p>A. E. Housman (1859-1936)<p>Eight O&#39;Clock<p>Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now<p>Stars, I Have Seen Them Fall<p>&ldquo;Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff . . .&rdquo;<p>William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)<p>The Lake Isle of Innisfree<p>Leda and the Swan<p>Sailing to Byzantium<p>The Second Coming<p>The Song of Wandering Aengus<p>Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869-1935)<p>Firelight<p>The Mill<p>Richard Cory<p>Stephen Crane (1871-1900)<p>The Trees in the Garden Rained Flowers<p>The Wayfarer<p>Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906)<p>We Wear the Mask<p>Robert Frost (1874-1963)<p>Acquainted with the Night<p>After Apple-Picking<p>Design<p>Home Burial<p>The Road Not Taken<p>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening<p>Adelaide Crapsey (1878-1034)<p>Amaze<p>Languor after Pain<p>Trapped<p>Wallace Stevens (1879-1955)<p>Anecdote of the Jar<p>Disillusionment of Ten O&#39;Clock<p>The Emperor of Ice-Cream<p>The Snow Man<p>Sunday Morning<p>&bull; The Worms at Heaven&rsquo;s Gate<p>William Carlos Williams (1883-1963)<p>The Last Words of My English Grandmother<p>The Red Wheelbarrow<p>Spring and All<p>Ezra Pound (1885-1972)<p>In a Station of the Metro<p>Portrait d&#39;une Femme<p>The River-Merchant&#39;s Wife&#58; A Letter<p>Elinor Wylie (1885-1928)<p>Let No Charitable Hope<p>Ophelia<p>H. D. (Hilda Doolittle) (1886-1961)<p>Pear Tree<p>Sea Rose<p>Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967)<p>Dreamers<p>Robinson Jeffers (1887-1962)<p>The Purse-Seine<p>Marianne Moore (1887-1972)<p>The Fish<p>Silence<p>T. S. Eliot (1888-1965)<p>Journey of the Magi<p>The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock<p>John Crowe Ransom (1888-1974)<p>Piazza Piece<p>Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950)<p>If I Should Learn, in Some Quite Casual Way<p>Oh, Oh, You Will Be Sorry for that Word<p>What Lips My Lips Have Kissed, and Where, and Why<p>Wilfred Owen (1893-1918)<p>Dulce et Decorum Est<p>e. e. cummings (1894-1962)<p>nobody loses all the time<p>pity this busy monster,manunkind<p>* plato told<p>r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r<p>Jean Toomer (1894-1967)<p>Georgia Dusk<p>Louise Bogan (1897-1970)<p>Women<p>Hart Crane (1899-1933)<p>Chaplinesque<p>Langston Hughes (1902-1967)<p>Dream Boogie<p>Theme for English B<p>The Weary Blues<p>Countee Cullen (1903-1946)<p>Incident<p>Yet Do I Marvel<p>A. D. Hope (1907-2000)<p>Imperial Adam<p>W. H. Auden (1907-1973)<p>As I Walked Out One Evening<p>Mus&eacute;e des Beaux Arts<p>The Unknown Citizen<p>Theodore Roethke (1908-1963)<p>Dolor<p>My Papa&#39;s Waltz<p>Root Cellar<p>Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)<p>The Fish<p>One Art<p>Sestina<p>Robert Hayden (1913-1980)<p>Those Winter Sundays<p>Dudley Randall (b. 1914)<p>Ballad of Birmingham<p>William Stafford (1914-1993)<p>Traveling through the Dark<p>Dylan Thomas (1914-1953)<p>Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night<p>Poem in October<p>Weldon Kees (1914-1955)<p>For My Daughter<p>Randall Jarrell (1914-1965)<p>&bull; 8<sup>th</sup> Air Force<p>The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner<p>Margaret Walker (b. 1915)<p>For Malcolm X<p>Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000)<p>the ballad of chocolate Mabbie<p>the mother<p>We Real Cool<p>Robert Lowell (1917-1977)<p>For the Union Dead<p>Lawrence Ferlinghetti (b. 1919)<p>A Coney Island of the Mind, #15<p>May Swenson (1919-1989)<p>How Everything Happens<p>Howard Nemerov (1920-1991)<p>A Primer of the Daily Round<p>Richard Wilbur (b. 1921)<p>&bull; Altitudes<p>The Writer<p>Year&#39;s End<p>Philip Larkin (1922-1985)<p>Next, Please<p>This Be the Verse<p>&bull; The Whitsun Weddings<p>James Dickey (1923-1997)<p>The Heaven of Animals<p>Alan Dugan (b. 1923)<p>Love Song&#58; I and Thou<p>Anthony Hecht (b. 1923)<p>&bull; The Dover Bitch<p>Third Avenue in Sunlight<p>Denise Levertov (1923-1999)<p>The Ache of Marriage<p>Louis Simpson (b. 1923)<p>American Classic<p>My Father in the Night Commanding No<p>Vassar Miller (1924-1997)<p>Subterfuge<p>Donald Justice (b. 1925)<p>Counting the Mad<p>Carolyn Kizer (b. 1925)<p>The Ungrateful Garden<p>Maxine Kumin (b. 1925)<p>Noted in the New York Times<p>Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997)<p>A Supermarket in California<p>James Merrill (1926-1995)<p>Casual Wear<p>W. D. Snodgrass (b. 1926)<p>Mementos, I<p>Frank O&#39;Hara (1926-1966)<p>The Day Lady Died<p>John Ashbery (b. 1927)<p>Farm Implements and Rutabagas in a Landscape<p>Paradoxes and Oxymorons<p>W. S. Merwin (b. 1927)<p>For the Anniversary of My Death<p>The Last One<p>James Wright (1927-1980)<p>Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio<p>Saint Judas<p>Philip Levine (b. 1928)<p>You Can Have It<p>Anne Sexton (1928-1974)<p>Cinderella<p>Thom Gunn (b. 1929)<p>From the Wave<p>Terminal<p>X. J. Kennedy (b. 1929)<p>In a Prominent Bar in Secaucus One Day<p>&bull; Little Elegy<p>Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)<p>Aunt Jennifer&#39;s Tigers<p>Diving into the Wreck<p>Rape<p>Ted Hughes (b. 1930)<p>Pike<p>Gary Snyder (b. 1930)<p>A Walk<p>Derek Walcott (b. 1930)<p>Central America<p>Miller Williams (b. 1930)<p>The Book<p>Linda Pastan (b. 1932)<p>Ethics<p>Sylvia Plath (1932-1963)<p>Daddy<p>Edge<p>Metaphors<p>Gerald Barrax (b. 1933)<p>Strangers like Us&#58; Pittsburgh, Raleigh, 1945-1985<p>Mark Strand (b. 1934)<p>The Tunnel<p>Russel Edson (b. 1935)<p>Ape<p>Mary Oliver (b. 1935)<p>The Black Walnut Tree<p>Fred Chappell (b. 1936)<p>Narcissus and Echo<p>Lucille Clifton (b. 1936)<p>homage to my hips<p>wishes for sons<p>Marge Piercy (b. 1936)<p>What&rsquo;s That Smell in the Kitchen?<p>Betty Adcock (b. 1938)<p>Voyages<p>Gary Gildner (b. 1938)<p>First Practice<p>Robert Phillips (b. 1938)<p>&bull; The Stone Crab&#58; A Love Poem<p>Dabney Stuart (b. 1938)<p>Discovering My Daughter<p>Margaret Atwood (b. 1939)<p>Siren Song<p>Stephen Dunn (b. 1939)<p>The Sacred<p>Seamus Heaney (b. 1939)<p>Punishment<p>* Clive James (b. 1959)<p>After the Storm<p>Ted Kooser (b. 1939)<p>Abandoned Farmhouse<p>Tom Disch (b. 1940)<p>Ballade of the New God<p>Florence Cassen Mayers (b. 1940)<p>All American Sestina<p>Pattiann Rogers (b. 1940)<p>Foreplay<p>Billy Collins (b. 1941)<p>Litany<p>Robert Hass (b. 1941)<p>&bull; Meditation at Lagunitas<p>Simon J. Ortiz (b. 1941)<p>The Serenity in Stones<p>Gibbons Ruark (b. 1941)<p>The Visitor<p>Gladys Cardiff (b. 1942)<p>Combing<p>B.H. Fairchild (b. 1942)<p>Body and Soul<p>Charles Martin (b. 1942)<p>E.S.L.<p>Sharon Olds (b. 1942)<p>The One Girl at the Boys Party<p>Diane Lockward (b. 1943)<p>My Husband Discovers Poetry<p>Ellen Bryant Voight (b. 1943)<p>Daughter<p>Robert Morgan (b. 1944)<p>Mountain Bride<p>Craig Raine (b. 1944)<p>A Martian Sends a Postcard Home<p>Enid Shomer (b. 1944)<p>Women Bathing at Bergen-Belsen<p>Wendy Cope (b. 1944)<p>Rondeau Redoubl&eacute;<p>Dick Davis (b. 1945)<p>A Monorhyme for the Shower<p>Kay Ryan (b. 1945)<p>Bestiary<p>Leon Stokesbury (b. 1945)<p>The Day Kennedy Died<p>* John Whitworth (b. 1945)<p>The Examiners<p>Marilyn Nelson (b. 1946)<p>The Ballad of Aunt Geneva<p>Ai (b. 1947)<p>Child Beater<p>Jim Hall (b. 1947)<p>Maybe Dats Your Pwoblem Too<p>Yusef Komunyakaa (b. 1947)<p>Facing It<p>Timothy Steele (b. 1948)<p>Sapphics Against Anger<p>James Fenton (b. 1949)<p>God, a Poem<p>Sarah Cortez (b. 1950)<p> Tu Negrito<p>Carolyn Forch&eacute; (b. 1950)<p>The Colonel<p>Dana Gioia (b. 1950)<p>Planting a Sequoia<p>Rodney Jones (b. 1950)<p>Winter Retreat&#58; Homage to Martin Luther King, Jr.<p>Timothy Murphy (b. 1950)<p>Case Notes<p>Joy Harjo (b. 1951)<p>She Had Some Horses<p>Andrew Hudgins (b. 1951)<p>Air View of an Industrial Scene<p>Judith Ortiz Cofer (b. 1952)<p>The Latin Deli&#58; An Ars Poetica<p>Rita Dove (b. 1952)<p>&bull; American Smooth<p>Mark Jarman (b. 1952)<p>After Disappointment<p>Julie Kane (b. 1952)<p>Alan Doll Rap<p>Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952)<p>The Traveling Onion<p>Alberto R&iacute;os (b. 1952)<p>The Purpose of Altar Boys<p>Julia Alvarez (b. 1953)<p>Bilingual Sestina<p>Harryette Mullen (b. 1953)<p>Dim Lady<p>Kim Addonizio (b. 1954)<p>* Sonnenizio on a Line from Michael Drayton<p>David Mason (b. 1954)<p>&bull; Fog Horns<p>Mary Jo Salter (b. 1954)<p>Welcome to Hiroshima<p>Cathy Song (b. 1955)<p>Stamp Collecting<p>Ginger Andrews (b. 1956)<p>Primping in the Rearview Mirror<p>* Joseph Harrison (b. 1957)<p>Air Larry<p>Catherine Tufariello (b. 1963)<p>Useful Advice<p>Sherman Alexie (b. 1966)<p>The Exaggeration of Despair<p>Natasha Trethewey (b. 1966)<p>Domestic Work, 1937<p>* Brian Turner (b. 1967)<p>Here, Bullet<p>Suji Kwock Kim (b. 1968)<p>Occupation<p>* Allison Joseph (b. 1967)<p>The Athlete<p>A. E. Stallings (b. 1968)<p>&bull; First Love&#58; A Quiz<p>Beth Ann Fennelly (b. 1971)<p>Asked for a Happy Memory of Her Father, She Recalls Wrigley Field<p>* Sophie Hannah (b. 1971)<p>The Guest Speaker<p>* Emily Moore (b. 1977)<p>Auld Lang Syne<p>Drama<p>Introduction to Drama<p>The Play&rsquo;s the Thing<p>Origins of Drama<p>Aristotle on Tragedy<p>Brief History and Description of Dramatic Conventions<p>Sophocles (496?-406 B.C.)<p>&bull; Antigone<p>William Shakespeare (1564-1616)<p>Othello<p>Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)<p>&bull; An Enemy of the People<p>Susan Glaspell (1882-1948)<p>Trifles<p>Tennessee Williams (1911-1983)<p>The Glass Menagerie<p>Athold Fugard (b. 1932)<p>&ldquo;Master Harold&rdquo; . . . and the boys<p>August Wilson (b. 1945)<p>The Piano Lesson<p>David Ives (b. 1950)<p>&bull; Sure Thing<p>* Milcha Sanchez-Scott (b. 1953)<p>The Cuban Swimmer<p>* Arlene Hutton (b. 1958)<p>A Dream Before I Take the Stand<p>Appendix A&#58; Writing about Literature
64I'll Fly Away: Further Testimonies from the Women of York PrisonWally Lamb2<p>Wally Lamb's books are neither short nor simple; but like a James Patterson of emotions, he pulls readers in and doesn't let go. His affecting novels are marvels of imagination and empathy.</p>Wally Lamb, I'll Fly Away Contributorsill-fly-awaywally-lamb97800616263950061626392$10.99PaperbackHarperCollins PublishersOctober 2008Penology & Correctional Studies - General & Miscellaneous, Prisons & Prison Life, American Literature Anthologies2885.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)<p>For several years, Wally Lamb, the author of two of the most beloved novels of our time, has run a writing workshop at the York Correctional Institution, Connecticut's only maximum-security prison for women. Writing, Lamb discovered, was a way for these women to face their fears and failures and begin to imagine better lives. <b>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</b>, a collection of their essays, was published in 2003 to great critical acclaim. With <b>I'll Fly Away</b>, Lamb offers readers a new volume of intimate pieces from the York workshop. Startling, heartbreaking, and inspiring, these stories are as varied as the individuals who wrote them, but each illuminates an important core truth: that a life <b>can</b> be altered through self-awareness and the power of the written word.</p><b>I'll Fly Away</b><br> Further Testimonies from the Women of York Prison <p><b>Chapter One</b></p> <p class="null1">Florida Memories</p> <p>By Bonnie Jean Foreshaw</p> <p>It's Thursday morning at 6:00 <small>A.M.</small>, and we two have just arrived at the open-air flea market, the largest in south Florida. I'm an apprentice shopper and my teacher is my Aunt Mandy. Later this morning, the market will be hot and crowded—alive with music, laughter, gossip, and bartering about the price of everything from necklaces to nectarines. But at the moment, it's cool and quiet. Our focus is fish.</p> <p>"Pay close attention to the <i>eyes</i> of the fish," Aunt Mandy instructs as we walk from stall to stall. "If the eyes are clear, not cloudy, and the color of the skin's not fading, then the fish is fresh." Auntie's dressed for shopping in a pink sleeveless blouse, burgundy pedal pushers, Italian sandals, and a white sun visor. I'm wearing shorts, a T-shirt, and rubber flip-flops. I am tall for my age, and starting to get the kind of shape men take a second look at. My glasses take up half my face. "But you have to shop with your finger and your nose, too, not just your eyes," Auntie instructs. "Poke the fish gently near its fin. If it leaves a dent, then you don't want it. If it doesn't, it's probably part of the morning's catch. And listen to me, Jeannie. Fresh fish never smells foul."</p> <p>We stop at one of the stalls where the fish are lined up, one against the other, on a bed of ice. The fish man approaches us. He's handsome—black hair, hazel eyes, tank top and cut-off jeans. "May I help you, ma'am?" I watch him take in Aunt Mandy's curves, her green eyes andhoney-colored complexion. I might as well be invisible.</p> <p>"Well, maybe you can," Auntie says. "Oh, by the way, I'm Mandy and this is my niece, Jeannie. Now what's your name?"</p> <p>"I'm Ricardo," the fish man says. He's sucking in his stomach, and his feet are moving up and down like he's trying to stretch his height. "It's nice to meet you, Mandy."</p> <p>"Nice to meet you, too. Now tell me, Ricardo, how much you want for these five yellowtails?"</p> <p>"Well, let's see. They're seventy-five cents apiece, so that's a total of . . ."</p> <p>He stops to watch Auntie pass her fingers through her shoulder-length hair. It's salt-and-pepper-colored, but Mandy's still got it. "Uh, three seventy-five." "Oh," Auntie says, half-shocked and half-disappointed. "That fellow three stalls down says he's selling his yellowtails for <i>fifty</i> cents each. So unless we can work out a deal . . ."</p> <p>The smile drops off of Mr. Ricardo's face, but Auntie's smile returns. Her gold tooth is glimmering. She shifts her weight, puts her hand on her hip.</p> <p>"Mandy, it's a deal," Ricardo says. "Five yellowtails for two-fifty. That's a dollar twenty-five cut I'm giving you."</p> <p>"Which I appreciate," Auntie says. "And look at it this way: you've just gained yourself a faithful customer. Now, tell me. How much you selling those red snappers for? If I can get them for the same price as the yellowtails, I'll buy some of them, too. And conch."</p> <p>I stand there looking from one to the other. Auntie touches the small gold cross at her throat. She fingers her earring. I can tell Mr. Ricardo is only pretending to do the math in his head. "Okay," he finally says. "Sold."</p> <p>Auntie pays for the fish and conch, thanks him, and we walk away. A few stalls down from Mr. Ricardo's, she turns to me. "Okay, now," she says. "Show me a fresh fish."</p> <p>I go up and down the row, looking each fish in the eye, then pick one up by its tail. I turn it, look at its other eye, study its coloration. When I press my finger against its head, near the fin, there's no indentation. "This one."</p> <p>Her look is serious. "You think this fish is fresh?"</p> <p>I hesitate. "Yes."</p> <p>Aunt Mandy flashes me her gold-toothed smile. "Well, Jeannie, now you know how to pick fresh fish."</p> <p>I'm excited to have passed the test, but I've been wondering something. "Auntie?" I say. "I don't remember going to any other fish stalls before we went to Mr. Ricardo's."</p> <p>She laughs. "You and I knew that, but Ricardo didn't. It's one of the tricks of the trade when you shop at the flea market. But bear in mind, Ricardo would rather make a sale than not sell. If he has fish left at the end of the day, that's a loss and a waste for him. So we were doing him a favor. Now, come on. Let's cross the street and I'll teach you how to pick out vegetables and fruit."</p> <p>We meander among the tomatoes and squashes, the potatoes and mangoes and plums. Shopping for fresh produce is a matter of looking and smelling, but mostly of <i>feeling</i>, Auntie says. "Fruits and vegetables can get damaged by cold weather, the way they're packed, or how far they've traveled to get to the market. If the skin is firm, that means it's fresh. If it's loose, then it isn't. And always check for bruises."</p> <p>Although I'm listening to my aunt, it's the peaches in the stall to my right that have my attention. They're big and beautiful, golden yellow with blushes of pink, and their aroma makes my mouth juice up. I'm thinking about how I might get myself one of those peaches.</p> <p>"Pick us out some bananas," Auntie says. It's test number two.</p> <p>My eyes pass over several bunches before I pick one up. I check each banana, one by one, then walk over to Auntie, who is examining pears. "These are nice, firm, and yellow," I say, handing her the bunch I've chosen. "Tight skin, no bruises."</p> <p>She twists the bunch back and forth, then nods her approval. "Good job," she says. Smiling all over myself, I decide to seize the moment. "Auntie, may I get a few peaches?"</p> <i><b>I'll Fly Away</b><br> Further Testimonies from the Women of York Prison</i>. Copyright © by Wally Lamb. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.<p><P>For several years, Wally Lamb, the author of two of the most beloved novels of our time, has run a writing workshop at the York Correctional Institution, Connecticut's only maximum-security prison for women. Writing, Lamb discovered, was a way for these women to face their fears and failures and begin to imagine better lives. <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i>, a collection of their essays, was published in 2003 to great critical acclaim. With <i>I'll Fly Away</i>, Lamb offers readers a new volume of intimate pieces from the York workshop. Startling, heartbreaking, and inspiring, these stories are as varied as the individuals who wrote them, but each illuminates an important core truth&#58; that a life <i>can</i> be altered through self-awareness and the power of the written word.</p><h3>Booklist</h3><p>&ldquo;Lamb . . . continues to offer readers an intimate look at women struggling to maintain their humanity.&rdquo;</p><br>In Remembrance&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;vii<br>Acknowledgments&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;ix<br>Revisions and Corrections&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Wally Lamb&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;1<br>When I Was a Child...<br>Florida Memories&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Bonnie Jean Foreshaw&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;13<br>Kidnapped!&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Robin Ledbetter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;19<br>Shhh, Don't Tell&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Deborah Ranger&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;26<br>In the Mood "Savannah"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;37<br>Tinker Bell&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Brendalis Medina&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;39<br>One Saturday Morning&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Chasity C. West&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;47<br>Gifts My Family Gave Me<br>The Captain&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kathleen Wyatt&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;57<br>A Brother's Gift&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Jennifer Rich&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;63<br>The Rainbow Ring&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Carmen Ramos&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;64<br>Pictures of a Daughter, Viewed in Prison&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Christina MacNaughton&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;67<br>Under-Where?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lynne M. Friend&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;68<br>Why I Write&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Careen Jennings&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;75<br>Lavender and Vanilla&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kimberly Walker&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;77<br>A Gift&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Robin Ledbetter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;78<br>Broken Dolls and Marionettes<br>Broken Doll&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lynda Gardner&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;85<br>"No" Is Not Just a Word&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Christina MacNaughton&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;89<br>Wishes&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Charissa Willette&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;92<br>The Marionette&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lynne M. Friend&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;104<br>Falling&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Robin Ledbetter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;114<br>Crime and Punishment<br>Lost and Found&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Roberta Schwartz&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;119<br>The Chase&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Brendalis Medina&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;151<br>Prom Queen&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Jennifer Rich&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;159<br>Down on the Farm&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kelly Donnelly&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;166<br>Big Girl Jail&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Robin Ledbetter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;168<br>Wasted Time&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Lisa White&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;176<br>Serpents&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Robin Ledbetter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;177<br>The Lights Are Flickering, Again&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Susan Budlong Cole&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;179<br>Just Another Death&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Christina MacNaughton&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;182<br>I'll Fly Away<br>My Three Fates&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Chasity C. West&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;191<br>Dance of the Willow&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kelly Donnelly&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;202<br>I Won't Burn Alone&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Brendalis Medina&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;203<br>Seasons' Rhythms&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kelly Donnelly&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;211<br>Flight of the Bumblebee&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Kathleen Wyatt&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;213<br>Reawakening Through Nature: A Prison Reflection&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Barbara Parsons&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;215<br>Contributors&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;241<br>Facilitators' Biographical Statements&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;253<article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4>In 1998, Wally Lamb began teaching writing to female convicts at Connecticut's York Correctional Institute. It was not for lack of a résumé; he was already an acclaimed novelist (<i>I Know This Much Is True; She's Come Undone</i>) and had been teaching high school for a quarter century. York was something different. After adjusting to his new constituency, Lamb realized that his students had disarming, often frightening stories to tell. In 2003, he published an anthology of these testimonies, the PEN/Newman's Own First Amendment Award-winning <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i>. This follow-up collection is just as bracing and profound. </article> <article> <h4>Booklist</h4>"Lamb . . . continues to offer readers an intimate look at women struggling to maintain their humanity." </article><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4><p>Novelist Lamb's (<i>I Know This Much Is True</i>) second collection of writing by the students in his writing workshop at the maximum-security York Correctional Institution in Connecticut, after <i>Couldn't Keep It to Myself</i>(2003), also focuses on the inspiring and raw emotions of women sharing the good and bad memories that shaped them. The 20 women whose work is featured here-18 inmates and two of Lamb's cofacilitators-show that writing is not just a way of capturing their most private thoughts and gripping emotions (e.g., hope, despair, courage), but also a powerful tool to foster hope and healing. They write from the heart in works ranging from poems to essays to short stories; each vignette is more compelling than the one before it. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries.<br> —Susan McClellan</p> </article> <article> <h4>Kirkus Reviews</h4>The second accomplished collection of writings from women incarcerated in Connecticut's York Correctional Institution, edited again by bestselling novelist Lamb (Couldn't Keep It to Myself: Testimonies from Our Imprisoned Sisters, 2003, etc.). One would have thought the first volume, with its probing examinations of lives run amok, would have convinced prison authorities of the value of a writing program in which prisoners focus and take account. But the prison bureaucracy tried to shut it down, writes an incredulous and furious Lamb, and they confiscated the prisoners' material. That particular draconian administration was replaced with a more enlightened group, Lamb reports, one that allowed for the rehabilitative value of writing. These works radiate what Lamb saw as the program's critical mission: to give the women wings "to hover above the confounding maze of their lives, and from that perspective . . . to see the patterns and dead ends of their past, and a way out." Some of the stories are rueful, others bitter, but all bite, even-perhaps especially-when they are gentle. None are self-pitying, but none shy away from speaking directly to the gross cruelties so often inflicted on their early years or young marriages. Each story, no matter how grim or gritty, shows polish, and the women display a wide array of emotions: unbridled anger, innocence, hope, resigned acceptance. While a few of the stories speak of angels who touched the women's lives, most display open wounds that are continuing to be healed by the cathartic power of words. Writing as an act of self-realization and liberation and, not incidentally, an indictment of the penal system. </article>
65American Earth: Environmental Writing Since ThoreauBill McKibben4<p><B>Bill McKibben</B> is the author of ten books, including <I>The End of Nature</I>, <I>The Age of Missing Information</I>, and <I>Enough&#58; Staying Human in an Engineered Age</I>. A former staff writer for <I>The New Yorker</I>, he writes regularly for <I>Harper&#8217;s</I>, <I>The Atlantic Monthly</I>, and <I>The New York Review of Books</I>, among other publications. He is a scholar in residence at Middlebury College and lives in Vermont with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern, and their daughter.</p>Bill McKibben (Editor), Al Goreamerican-earthbill-mckibben97815985302091598530208$29.13HardcoverLibrary of AmericaApril 2008Natural Literature & History, Literature Anthologies - General & Miscellaneous, American Literature Anthologies9005.12 (w) x 8.18 (h) x 2.10 (d)<p>As America and the world grapple with the consequences of global environmental change, writer and activist Bill McKibben offers this unprecedented, provocative, and timely anthology, gathering the best and most significant American environmental writing from the last two centuries.</p> <p>Classics of the environmental imagination-the essays of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and John Burroughs; Aldo Leopold's <i>A Sand County Almanac</i>; Rachel Carson's <i>Silent Spring</i>'are set against the inspiring story of an emerging activist movement, as revealed by newly uncovered reports of pioneering campaigns for conservation, passages from landmark legal opinions and legislation, and searing protest speeches. Here are some of America's greatest and most impassioned writers, taking a turn toward nature and recognizing the fragility of our situation on earth and the urgency of the search for a sustainable way of life. Thought-provoking essays on overpopulation, consumerism, energy policy, and the nature of 'nature' join ecologists' memoirs and intimate sketches of the habitats of endangered species. The anthology includes a detailed chronology of the environmental movement and American environmental history, as well as an 80-page color portfolio of illustrations.</p><b>AMERICAN EARTH</b> <b>Environmental Writing Since Thoreau</b> <br> <b>By Bill McKibben</b> <br> <b>THE LIBRARY OF AMERICA</b> <b>Copyright © 2008</b> <b>Literary Classics of the United States, New York, NY.<br> All right reserved.</b><br> <b>ISBN: 978-1-59853-020-9</b> <br> <br> <br> <br> <b>Chapter One</b> <b>HENRY DAVID THOREAU</b> <p>Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was born, grew up, lived out his life, and died in Concord, Massachusetts. He studied at Harvard from 1833 to 1837, then signed on as a teacher at Concord Academy but was dismissed for refusing to whip students. He and his brother John opened an elementary school in 1838, where, according to some authorities, they invented the idea of the field trip. John became sick in 1841 and the brothers closed the school; Henry went to live with Ralph Waldo Emerson, beginning a long friendship with him and with the other members of the Transcendental Club, among them Bronson Alcott and Margaret Fuller. The other transcendentalists experimented with communes like Brook Farm, but Thoreau was more solitary, and the most important years in his life began in 1845 when he took up residence in a small cabin he'd built on the shore of Walden Pond a short walk from town. He spent two years, two months, and two days there, experimenting with simplifying his life. Thorean's isolation at Walden wasn't absolute or deliberately ascetic-he often returned to town to see friends and eat meals, had a steady stream of visitors (often too steady for his taste), and at one point engaged in a political protest, spending a night in Concord jail for his refusal to pay his poll tax. But it was notably productive: he returned to town with the draft of one book (<i>A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers</i>) and the notes that he would spend the next six years turning into <i>Walden</i> (1854), perhaps the most remarkable book in the American canon. As dense as scripture, crowded with aphorism, <i>Walden</i> is full of enough ideas for a score of ordinary books. But it has lived as long and as fully as any other writing of its vintage and inspired all the best kinds of people: both Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. claimed him as a major influence. Thoreau suffered from tuberculosis contracted during his college years: his condition worsened beginning in 1859, and he spent his last years revising his accounts of the Maine woods and other works. As he neared death his aunt Louisa asked him if he had made his peace with God. "I did not know we had ever quarreled," he said. He died at the age of 44.</p> <p>Picking a few fragments from his writings is an impossible task: an anthology of American environmental writing might well be one-third Thoreau. Here are a few entries from his copious journals, and then the description from <i>Walden</i> of the building of the famous cabin. "Huckleberries," a late essay or lecture-text, shows the modern nature essay being born, with a small root giving way to a luxuriant growth of thought and speculation.</p> <p><b><i>from Journals</i></b></p> <p>Oct. 24th 1837.</p> <p>The Mould our Deeds Leave.</p> <p>Every part of nature teaches that the passing away of one life is the making room for another. The oak dies down to the ground, leaving within its rind a rich virgin mould, which will impart a vigorous life to an infant forest - - The pine leaves a sandy and sterile soil-the harder woods a strong and fruitful mould. - -</p> <p>So this constant abrasion and decay makes the soil of my future growth. As I live now so shall I reap. If I grow pines and birches, my virgin mould will not sustain the oak, but pines and birches, or, perchance, weeds and brambles, will constitute my second growth. - -</p> <p>March 6th 1838</p> <p>- - How can a man sit down and quietly pare his nails, while the earth goes gyrating ahead amid such a din of sphere music, whirling him along about her axis some twenty four thousand miles between sun and sun? but mainly in a circle some two millions of miles actual progress. And then such a hurly-burly on the surface-wind always blowing-now a zephyr, now a hurricane-tides never idle, ever fluctuating, no rest for Niagara, but perpetual ran-tan on those limestone rocks-and then that summer simmering which our ears are used to-which would otherwise be christened confusion worse confounded, but is now ironically called "silence audible"-and above all the incessant tinkering named hum of industry-the hurrying to and fro and confused jabbering of men-Can man do less than get up and shake himself?</p> <p>April 24th 1838.</p> <p>Steam ships</p> <p>-Men have been contriving new means and modes of motion-Steam ships have been westering during these late days and nights on the Atlantic waves-the fuglers of a new evolution to this generation - - Meanwhile plants spring silently by the brook sides-and the grim woods wave indifferent-the earth emits no howl pot on fire simmers and seethes and men go about their business. - -</p> <p>Saturday March 19th 1842</p> <p>When I walk in the fields of Concord and meditate on the destiny of this prosperous slip of the Saxon <i>family</i>-the unexhausted energies of this new country-I forget that this which is now Concord was once Musketaquid and that the <i>American race</i> has had its destiny also. Everywhere in the fields-in the corn and grain land-the earth is strewn with the relics of a race which has vanished as completely as if trodden in with the earth.</p> <p>I find it good to remember the eternity behind me as well as the eternity before. Where ever I go I tread in the tracks of the Indian-I pick up the bolt which he has but just dropped at my feet. And if I consider destiny I am on his trail. I scatter his hearth stones with my feet, and pick out of the embers of his fire the simple but enduring implements of the wigwam and the chace-In planting my corn in the same furrow which yielded its increase to his support so long-I displace some memorial of him.</p> <p>I have been walking this afternoon over a pleasant field planted with winter rye-near the house. Where this strange people once had their dwelling place. Another species of mortal men but little less wild to me than the musquash they hunted-Strange spirits-daemons-whose eyes could never meet mine. With another nature-and another fate than mine- The crows flew over the edge of the woods, and wheeling over my head seemed to rebuke-as dark winged spirits more akin to the Indian than I. Perhaps only the present disguise of the Indian- If the new has a meaning so has the old.</p> <p>Nature has her russet hues as well as green-Indeed our eye splits on every object, and we can as well take one path as the other-If I consider its history it is old-if its destiny it is new-I may see a part of an object or the whole-I will not be imposed on and think nature is old, because the season is advanced I will study the botany of the mosses and fungi on the decayed-and remember that decayed wood is not old, but has just begun to be what it is. I need not think of the pine almond or the acorn and sapling when I meet the fallen pine or oak-more than of the generations of pines and oaks which have fed the young tree.</p> <p>The new blade of the corn-the third leaf of the melon-these are not green but gray with time, but sere in respect of time.</p> <p>September 12, 1851</p> <p>2 PM To the Three Friends' Hill beyond Flints Pond-via RR. RWEs Wood Path S side Walden-Geo Heywood's Cleared Lot &amp; Smith's orchards-return via E of Flints' P via Goose P &amp; my old home to RR-</p> <p>I go to Flints P. for the sake of the <i>Mt</i> view from the hill beyond looking over Concord. I have thought it the best especially in the winter which I can get in this neighborhood. It is worth the while to see the <i>Mts</i> in the horizon once a day. I have thus seen some earth which corresponds to my least earthly &amp; trivial-to my most heaven-ward looking thoughts-The earth seen through an azure an etherial veil. They are the natural <i>temples</i> elevated brows of the earth-looking at which the thoughts of the beholder are naturally elevated and etherialized. I wish to see the earth through the medium of much air or heaven-for there is no paint like the air. <i>Mts</i> thus seen are worthy of worship. I go to Flints' Pond also to see a rippling lake &amp; a reedy-island in its midst-Reed Island.</p> <p>A man should feed his senses with the best that the land affords</p> <p>At the entrance to the Deep Cut I heard the telegraph wire vibrating like an AÆolian Harp. It reminded me suddenly-reservedly with a beautiful paucity of communication-even silently, such was its effect on my thoughts-It reminded me, I say, with a certain pathetic moderation-of what finer &amp; deeper stirrings I was susceptible-which grandly set all argument &amp; dispute aside- -a triumphant though transient exhibition of the truth. It told me by the faintest imaginable strain-it told me by the finest strain that a human ear can hear-yet conclusively &amp; past all refutation-that there were higher infinitely higher plains of life-which it behoved me never to forget. As I was entering the Deep Cut the wind which was conveying a message to me from heaven dropt it on the wire of the telegraph which it vibrated as it past. I instantly sat down on a stone at the foot of the telegraph pole-&amp; attended to the communication. It merely said "Bear in mind, Child &amp; never for an instant forget-that there are higher plains infinitely higher plains of life than this thou art now travelling on. Know that the goal is distant &amp; is upward and is worthy all your life's efforts to attain to." And then it ceased and though I sat some minutes longer I heard nothing more.</p> <p>There is every variety &amp; degree of inspiration from mere fullness of life to the most rapt mood. A human soul is played on even as this wire-which now vibrates slowly &amp; gently so that the passer can hardly hear it &amp; anon the sound swells &amp; vibrates with such intensity as if it would rend the wire-as far as the elasticity &amp; tension of the wire permits-and now it dies away and is silent-&amp; though the breeze continues to sweep over it, no strain comes from it-&amp; the traveller hearkens in vain. It is no small gain to have this wire stretched through Concord though there may be no Office here. Thus I make my own use of the telegraph-without consulting the Directors-like the sparrows which I perceive use it extensively for a perch.</p> <p>Shall I not go to this office to hear if there is any communication for me-as steadily as to the Post office in the village?</p> <p>Tuesday Dec 30th</p> <p>Mem. Go to the Deep Cut. The flies now crawl forth from the crevices all covered with dust, dreaming of summer-without life or energy enough to clean their wings</p> <p>This afternoon being on fair Haven Hill I heard the sound of a saw-and soon after from the cliff saw two men sawing down a noble pine beneath about 40 rods off. I resolved to watch it till it fell-the last of a dozen or more which were left when the forest was cut and for 15 years have waved in solitary majesty over the sproutland. I saw them like beavers or insects gnawing at the trunk of this noble tree, the diminutive mannikins with their crosscut saw which could scarcely span it. It towered up a hundred feet as I afterward found by measurement-one of the tallest probably now in the township &amp; straight as an arrow, but slanting a little toward the hill side.-its top seen against the frozen river &amp; the hills of Conantum. I watch closely to see when it begins to move. Now the sawers stop-and with an axe open it a little on the side toward which it leans that it may break the faster. And now their saw goes again-Now surely it is going-it is inclined one quarter of the quadrant, and breathless I expect its crashing fall-But no I was mistaken it has not moved an inch, it stands at the same angle as at first. It is 15 minutes yet to its fall. Still its branches wave in the wind as if it were destined to stand for a century, and the wind soughs through its needles as of yore; it is still a forest tree-the most majestic tree that waves over Musketaquid.-The silvery sheen of the sunlight is reflected from its needles-it still affords an inaccessible crotch for the squirrel's nest not a lichen has forsaken its mastlike stem- -its raking mast-the hill is the hull. Now's the moment the mannikins at its base are fleeing from their crime-they have dropped the guilty saw &amp; axe. How slowly &amp; majestically it starts-as if it were only swayed by a summer breeze and would return without a sigh to its location in the air-&amp; now it fans the hill side with its fall and it lies down to its bed in the valley from which it is never to rise, as softly as a feather, folding its green mantle about it like a warrior-as if tired of standing it embraced the earth with silent joy.-returning its elements to the dust again-but hark! there you only saw-but did not hear-There now comes up a deafening crash to these rocks-advertising you that even trees do not die without a groan. It rushes to embrace the earth, &amp; mingle its elements with the dust. And now all is still once more &amp; forever both to eye &amp; ear.</p> <p>I went down and measured it. It was about 4 feet in diameter where it was sawed-about 100 feet long. Before I had reached it-the axe-men had already half divested it of its branches. Its gracefully spreading top was a perfect wreck on the hill side as if it had been made of glass-&amp; the tender cones of one years growth upon its summit appealed in vain &amp; too late to the mercy of the chopper. Already he has measured it with his axe-and marked out the mill logs it will make. And the space it occupied in upper air is vacant for the next 2 centuries. It is lumber He has laid waste the air. When the fish hawk in the spring revisits the banks of the Musketaquid, he will circle in vain to find his accustomed perch.-&amp; the henhawk will mourn for the pines lofty enough to protect her brood. A plant which it has taken two centuries to perfect rising by slow stages into the heavens-has this afternoon ceased to exist. Its sapling top had expanded to this January thaw as the forerunner of summers to come. Why does not the village bell sound a knell. I hear no knell tolled-I see no procession of mourners in the streets-or the woodland aisles-The squirrel has leapt to another tree-the hawk has circled further off-&amp; has now settled upon a new eyre but the woodman is preparing to lay his axe at the root of that also.</p> <p>Dec 31st</p> <p>The 3d warm day. now overcast and beginning to drizzle. Still it is inspiriting as the brightest weather though the sun surely is not agoing to shine. There is a latent light in the mist-as if there were more electricity than usual in the air. These are warm foggy days in winter which excite us.</p> <p>It reminds me this thick spring like weather, that 1 have not enough valued and attended to the pure clarity &amp; brilliancy of the winter skies-Consider in what respects the winter sunsets differ from the summer ones. Shall I ever in summer evenings see so celestial a reach of blue sky contrasting with amber as I have seen a few days since-The day sky in winter corresponds for clarity to the night sky in which the stars shine &amp; twinkle so brightly in this latitude.</p> <p>I am too late perhaps, to see the sand foliage in the deep cut-should have been there day before yesterday-it is now too wet &amp; soft.</p> <p><i>(Continues...)</i></p> <p><br> </p> <blockquote><br> Excerpted from <b>AMERICAN EARTH</b> by <b>Bill McKibben</b> Copyright © 2008 by Literary Classics of the United States, New York, NY.. Excerpted by permission.<br> All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.<br> Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.<br> </blockquote><p><P>As America and the world grapple with the consequences of global environmental change, writer and activist Bill McKibben offers this unprecedented, provocative, and timely anthology, gathering the best and most significant American environmental writing from the last two centuries. <P>Classics of the environmental imagination&#151;the essays of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and John Burroughs; Aldo Leopold's <i>A Sand County Almanac</i>; Rachel Carson's <i>Silent Spring</i>&#151;are set against the inspiring story of an emerging activist movement, as revealed by newly uncovered reports of pioneering campaigns for conservation, passages from landmark legal opinions and legislation, and searing protest speeches. Here are some of America's greatest and most impassioned writers, taking a turn toward nature and recognizing the fragility of our situation on earth and the urgency of the search for a sustainable way of life. Thought-provoking essays on overpopulation, consumerism, energy policy, and the nature of &ldquo;nature&rdquo; join ecologists' memoirs and intimate sketches of the habitats of endangered species. The anthology includes a detailed chronology of the environmental movement and American environmental history, as well as an 80-page color portfolio of illustrations.</p><h3>The Washington Post - Gregory McNamee</h3><p>What truly sets the anthology apart is not the mix of the obscure and the familiar but McKibben's habit of enlisting voices whom we are not accustomed to thinking of as environmentalists or ecologists. I'd be willing to bet that this is the first work of nature writing to feature the drawings of R. Crumb, of Zap Comix fame, alongside lyrics by Marvin Gaye&#8230;Well selected, full of surprises and informed by McKibben's thoughtful commentary, <i>American Earth</i> is the first anthology of American nature writing to come close to the standard Thomas Lyon set two decades ago with <i>"This Incomperable Lande": A Book of American Nature Writing.</i> Ours is an incomparable land indeed, and McKibben's collection is a welcome reminder.</p><b>Contents</b> Foreword, by Al Gore....................xvii<br>Introduction....................xxi<br>Henry David Thoreau from Journals....................2<br>from Walden; or, Life in the Woods....................9<br>from Huckleberries....................26<br>George Catlin from Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians....................37<br>Lydia Huntley Sigourney Fallen Forests....................46<br>Susan Fenimore Cooper from Rural Hours....................48<br>Table Rock Album....................59<br>Walt Whitman from Leaves of Grass George Perkins Marsh from Man and Nature....................71<br>P. T. Barnum from The Humbugs of the World....................81<br>John Muir from A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf....................85<br>A Wind-Storm in the Forests....................89<br>from My First Summer in the Sierra....................98<br>Hetch Hetchy Valley....................104<br>W.H.H. Murray from Adventures in the Wilderness....................113<br>Frederick Law Olmsted from A Review of Recent Changes, and Changes Which Have Been Projected, in the Plans of the Central Park....................120<br>J. Sterling Morton About Trees....................126<br>Theodore Roosevelt To Frank Michler Chapman....................130<br>To John Burroughs....................131<br>Speech at Grand Canyon, Arizona, May 6, 1903....................132<br>Mary Austin The Scavengers....................134<br>Nathaniel Southgate Shaler from Man and the Earth....................140<br>John Burroughs The Art of Seeing Things....................146<br>The Grist of the Gods....................159<br>Nature NearHome....................168<br>Gifford Pinchot Prosperity....................173<br>William T. Hornaday The Bird Tragedy on Laysan Island....................181<br>Theodore Dreiser A Certain Oil Refinery....................186<br>Gene Stratton-Porter The Last Passenger Pigeon....................192<br>Henry Beston Orion Rises on the Dunes....................205<br>Benton MacKaye The Indigenous and the Metropolitan....................209<br>J. N. "Ding" Darling "What a few more seasons will do to the ducks"....................224<br>Robert Marshall from Wintertrip into New Country....................225<br>Don Marquis what the ants are saying....................235<br>Caroline Henderson Letter from the Dust Bowl....................239<br>Donald Culross Peattie Birds That Are New Yorkers....................245<br>Robinson Jeffers The Answer....................251<br>Carmel Point....................252<br>John Steinbeck from The Grapes of Wrath....................254<br>Woody Guthrie This Land Is Your Land....................958<br>Marjory Stoneman Douglas from The Everglades&#58; River of Grass....................260<br>Aldo Leopold from A Sand County Almanac....................266<br>Berton Rouech&eacute; The Fog....................295<br>Edwin Way Teale The Longest Day....................313<br>Helen and Scott Nearing from Living the Good Life....................318<br>Sigurd F. Olson Northern Lights....................323<br>E. B. White Sootfall and Fallout....................327<br>Loren Eiseley How Flowers Changed the World....................337<br>William O. Douglas from My Wilderness&#58; The Pacific West....................348<br>Dissent in Sierra Club v. Morton....................355<br>Jane Jacobs from The Death and Life of Great America Cities....................359<br>Rachel Carson from Silent Spring....................366<br>Russell Baker The Great Paver....................377<br>Eliot Porter The Living Canyon....................380<br>Howard Zahniser from The Wilderness Act of 1964....................392<br>Lyndon B. Johnson Remarks at the Signing of the Highway Beautification Act of 1965....................395<br>Kenneth E. Boulding from The Economics of the Coming Spaceship Earth....................399<br>Lynn White Jr. On the Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis....................405<br>Edward Abbey Polemic&#58; Industrial Tourism and the National Parks....................413<br>Paul R. Ehrlich from The Population Bomb....................434<br>Garrett Hardin from The Tragedy of the Commons....................438<br>Philip K. Dick from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?....................451<br>Colin Fletcher A Sample Day in the Kitchen....................454<br>R. Buckminster Fuller Spaceship Earth....................464<br>Stephanie Mills Mills College Valedictory Address....................469<br>Gary Snyder Smokey the Bear Sutra....................473<br>Covers the Ground....................477<br>Denis Hayes The Beginning....................480<br>Joseph Lelyveld Millions Join Earth Day Observances Across the Nation....................484<br>Joni Mitchell & Marvin Gage Big Yellow Taxi....................490<br>Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)....................491<br>John McPhee from Encounters with the Archdruid....................493<br>Friends of the Earth from Only One Earth....................500<br>Wendell Berry Manifesto&#58; The Mad Farmer Liberation Front....................505<br>The Making of a Marginal Farm....................507<br>Preserving Wildness....................516<br>Annie Dillard Fecundity....................531<br>Lewis Thomas The World's Biggest Membrane....................550<br>David R. Brower The Third Planet&#58; Operating Instructions....................555<br>Amory B. Lovins from Energy Strategy&#58; The Road Not Taken?....................559<br>N. Scott Momaday A First American Views His Land....................570<br>Leslie Marmon Silko from Ceremony....................582<br>R. Crumb A Short History of America....................591<br>Wes Jackson Outside the Solar Village&#58; One Utopian Farm....................595<br>Lois Marie Gibbs from Love Canal&#58; My Story....................609<br>Jonathan Schell from The Fate of the Earth....................622<br>William Cronon Seasons of Want and Plenty....................632<br>Alice Walker Everything Is a Human Being....................659<br>E. O. Wilson Bernhardsdorp....................671<br>C&eacute;sar Ch&aacute;vez Wrath of Grapes Boycott Speech....................690<br>Barry Lopez A Presentation of Whales....................696<br>W. S. Merwin Place....................716<br>Bill McKibben from The End of Nature....................718<br>Robert D. Bullard from Dumping in Dixie....................725<br>Mary Oliver The Summer Day....................737<br>Terry Tempest Williams from Refuge&#58; An Unnatural History of Family and Place....................739<br>Rick Bass from The Ninemile Wolves....................760<br>Alan Durning The Dubious Rewards of Consumption....................770<br>Scott Russell Sanders After the Flood....................781<br>George B. Schaller from The Last Panda....................790<br>Ellen Meloy The Flora and Fauna of Las Vegas....................793<br>Linda Hogan Dwellings....................809<br>David Abram from The Ecology of Magic....................815<br>Jack Turner The Song of the White Pelican....................835<br>Carl Anthony & Ren&eacute;e Soule A Multicultural Approach to Ecopsychology....................849<br>Al Gore Speech at the Kyoto Climate Change Conference....................855<br>Richard Nelson from Heart and Blood&#58; Living with Deer in America....................860<br>David Quammen Planet of Weeds....................874<br>Janisse Ray from Ecology of a Cracker Childhood....................898<br>Julia Butterfly Hill from The Legacy of Luna....................907<br>Calvin B. DeWitt from Inspirations for Sustaining Life on Earth&#58; Greeting Friends in Their Andean Gardens....................920<br>Sandra Steingraber from Having Faith....................929<br>Barbara Kingsolver Knowing Our Place....................939<br>Michael Pollan from The Omnivore's Dilemma....................948<br>Paul Hawken from Blessed Unrest....................961<br>Rebecca Solnit The Thoreau Problem....................971<br>Chronology....................997<br>Note on the Illustrations....................1005<br>Sources and Acknowledgments....................1015<br>Index....................1025<br><article> <h4>Gregory McNamee</h4>What truly sets the anthology apart is not the mix of the obscure and the familiar but McKibben's habit of enlisting voices whom we are not accustomed to thinking of as environmentalists or ecologists. I'd be willing to bet that this is the first work of nature writing to feature the drawings of R. Crumb, of Zap Comix fame, alongside lyrics by Marvin Gaye…Well selected, full of surprises and informed by McKibben's thoughtful commentary, <i>American Earth</i> is the first anthology of American nature writing to come close to the standard Thomas Lyon set two decades ago with <i>"This Incomperable Lande": A Book of American Nature Writing.</i> Ours is an incomparable land indeed, and McKibben's collection is a welcome reminder.<br> —The Washington Post </article> <article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4><p>In his introduction to this superb anthology, McKibben (<i>The End of Nature</i>) proposes that "environmental writing is America's most distinctive contribution to the world's literature." The collected pieces amply prove the point. Arranged chronologically, McKibben's selection of more than 100 writers includes some of the great early conservationists, such as Henry David Thoreau, John Muir and John Burroughs, and many other eloquent nature writers, including Donald Cultross Peattie, Edwin Way Teale and Henry Beston. The early exponents of national parks and wilderness areas have their say, as do writers who have borne witness to environmental degradation-John Steinbeck and Caroline Henderson on the dust bowl, for example, and Berton Roueché and others who have reported on the effects of toxic pollution. Visionaries like Buckminster Fuller and Amory Lovins are represented, as are a wealth of contemporary activist/writers, among them Barry Lopez, Terry Tempest Williams, Barbara Kingsolver, Michael Pollan, Paul Hawken, and Calvin deWitt, cofounder of the Evangelical Environmental Network. McKibben's trenchant introductions to the pieces sum up each writer's thoughts and form a running commentary on the progress of the conservation movement. The book, being published on Earth Day, can be read as a survey of the literature of American environmentalism, but above all, it should be enjoyed for the sheer beauty of the writing. 80-page color illus, not seen by <i>PW</i>. <i>(Apr. 22 [Earth Day])</i></p> Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information </article><article> <h4>School Library Journal</h4><p>Adult/High School- There have been some excellent collections of nature writing published in recent years (<i>The Norton Anthology of Nature Writing</i> is one fine example), but not until now has there been a definitive anthology of American environmental writing. In this superbly edited volume, McKibben draws a clear distinction between the two. The best of the latter often celebrates nature, but also asks searching questions about the impact of human life on the planet. After a poignant foreword by Al Gore, as well as his own illuminating introduction, McKibben begins with the work of a writer, thinker, and activist ahead of his time, Henry David Thoreau, and ends the volume with Rebecca Solnit's essay, "The Thoreau Problem." She notes that many people think of Thoreau only as a man alone observing nature, but the author of "Civil Disobedience," before enjoying his day of huckleberry picking, spent a night in jail rather than pay taxes to a government guilty of ignoring the higher laws of nature. This vast and varied collection, arranged chronologically, includes many seminal names, such as John Muir, Rachel Carson, and Wendell Berry, and some that are less well known or unexpected, like Benton MacKaye, Caroline Henderson, P. T. Barnum, and Philip K. Dick. Most of the selections derive from longer prose works, but there is also a smattering of poems, song lyrics, and cartoons. Although the heft of the volume might scare away some teens, others may realize that they could easily read bits and pieces, and that they would benefit greatly by any amount of time spent in these pages. Numerous photographs, many in full color, are included.-<i>Robert Saunderson, Berkeley Public Library,CA</i></p> </article>
66Best Poems of the English Language: From Chaucer Through Robert FrostHarold Bloom5<p>One of our most popular, respected, and controversial literary critics, Yale University professor Harold Bloom s books about, variously, Shakespeare, the Bible, and the classic literature are as erudite as they are accessible.</p>Harold Bloombest-poems-of-the-english-languageharold-bloom97800605404250060540427$15.79PaperbackHarperCollins PublishersAugust 2007ReprintPoetry, American Literature Anthologies, Anthologies, English, Irish, & Scottish Poetry10086.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.80 (d)<p>This comprehensive anthology attempts to give the common reader possession of six centuries of great British and American poetry. The book features a large introductory essay by Harold Bloom called "The Art of Reading Poetry," which presents his critical reflections of more than half a century devoted to the reading, teaching, and writing about the literary achievement he loves most. In the case of all major poets in the language, this volume offers either the entire range of what is most valuable in their work, or vital selections that illuminate each figure's contribution. There are also headnotes by Harold Bloom to every poet in the volume as well as to the most important individual poems. Much more than any other anthology ever gathered, this book provides readers who desire the pleasures of a sublime art with very nearly everything they need in a single volume. It also is regarded as his final meditation upon all those who have formed his mind.</p><b>The Best Poems of the English Language</b><br> From Chaucer Through Robert Frost <h3>Chapter One</h3> <h4>The Art of Reading Poetry</h4> <p>Poetry essentially is figurative language, concentrated so that its form is both expressive and evocative. Figuration is a departure from the literal, and the form of a great poem itself can be a trope ("turning") or figure. A common dictionary equivalent for "figurative language" is "metaphorical," but a metaphor actually is a highly specific figure, or turning from the literal. Kenneth Burke, a profound student of rhetoric, or the language of figures, distinguished four fundamental tropes: irony, synecdoche, metonymy, and metaphor. As Burke tells us, irony commits those who employ it to issues of presence and absence, since they are saying one thing while meaning something so different that it can be the precise opposite. We learn to wince when Hamlet says: "I humbly thank you" or its equivalent, since the prince generally is neither humble nor grateful.</p> <p>We now commonly call synecdoche "symbol," since the figurative substitution of a part for a whole also suggests that incompletion in which something within the poem stands for something outside it. Poets frequently identify more with one trope than with the others. Among major American poets, Robert Frost (despite his mass reputation) favors irony, while Walt Whitman is the great master of synecdoche.</p> <p>In metonymy, contiguity replaces resemblance, since the name or prime aspect of anything is sufficient to indicate it, provided it is near in space to what serves as substitute. Childe Roland, in Browning's remarkable monologue, is represented at the very end by the "slug-horn" ortrumpet upon which he dauntlessly blows: "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came."</p> <p>Metaphor proper transfers the ordinary associations of one word to another, as when Hart Crane beautifully writes "peonies with pony manes," enhancing his metaphor by the pun between "peonies" and "pony." Or again Crane, most intensely metaphorical of poets, refers to the Brooklyn Bridge's curve as its "leap," and then goes on to call the bridge both harp and altar.</p> <p>Figurations or tropes create meaning, which could not exist without them, and this making of meaning is largest in authentic poetry, where an excess or overflow emanates from figurative language, and brings about a condition of newness. Owen Barfield's <i>Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning</i> is one of the best guides to this process, when he traces part of the poetic history of the English word "ruin."</p> <p>The Latin verb <i>ruo</i>, meaning "rush" or "collapse," led to the substantive <i>ruina</i> for what had fallen. Chaucer, equally at home in French and English, helped to domesticate "ruin" as "a falling":</p> <blockquote>Min is the ruine of the highe halles,<br> The falling of the towers and of the walles.</blockquote> <p>One feels the chill of that, the voice being Saturn's or time's in "The Knight's Tale." Chaucer's disciple Edmund Spenser, has the haunting line:</p> <blockquote>The old ruines of a broken tower</blockquote> <p>My last selection in this book is Hart Crane's magnificent death ode, "The Broken Tower," in which Spenser's line reverberates. Barfield emphasizes Shakespeare's magnificence in the employment of "ruin," citing "Bare ruin'd choirs where late the sweet birds sang" from Sonnet 73, and the description of Cleopatra's effect upon her lover: "The noble ruin of her magic, Antony." I myself find even stronger the blind Gloucester's piercing outcry when he confronts the mad King Lear (IV, VI, 134–135):</p> <blockquote>O ruin'd piece of nature! This great world<br> Shall so wear out to nought.</blockquote> <p>Once Barfield sets one searching, the figurative power of "ruined" seems endless. Worthy of Shakespeare himself is John Donne, in his "A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy's Day," where love resurrects the poet to his ruin:</p> <blockquote>Study me then, you who shall lovers be<br> At the next world, that is, at the next spring:<br> For I am every dead thing,<br> In whom love wrought new alchemy.<br> For his art did express<br> A quintessence even from nothingness,<br> From dull privations, and lean emptiness<br> He ruined me, and I am re-begot<br> Of absence, darkness, death; things which are not.</blockquote> <p>Barfield invokes what he rightly calls Milton's "terrific phrase": "Hell saw / Heaven ruining from Heaven," and then traces Wordsworth's allusive return to Milton. Rather than add further instances, I note Barfield's insight, that the figurative power of "ruin" depends upon restoring its original sense of <i>movement</i>, of rushing toward a collapse. One of the secrets of poetic rhetoric in English is to romance the etonym (as it were), to renew what Walter Pater called the "finer edges" of words.</p> <i><b>The Best Poems of the English Language</b><br> From Chaucer Through Robert Frost</i>. Copyright © by Harold Bloom. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.<p><P>This comprehensive anthology attempts to give the common reader possession of six centuries of great British and American poetry. The book features a large introductory essay by Harold Bloom called "The Art of Reading Poetry," which presents his critical reflections of more than half a century devoted to the reading, teaching, and writing about the literary achievement he loves most. In the case of all major poets in the language, this volume offers either the entire range of what is most valuable in their work, or vital selections that illuminate each figure's contribution. There are also headnotes by Harold Bloom to every poet in the volume as well as to the most important individual poems. Much more than any other anthology ever gathered, this book provides readers who desire the pleasures of a sublime art with very nearly everything they need in a single volume. It also is regarded as his final meditation upon all those who have formed his mind.</p>
67Humor Me: An Anthology of Funny Contemporary Writing (Plus Some Great Old Stuff Too)Ian Frazier0<p><P>Ian Frazier is the author of many books, including <i>Great Plains</i>, <i>On the Rez</i>, <i>Coyote v. Acme</i>, <i>Dating Your Mom</i>, and, most recently, <i>Travels in Siberia</i>. A frequent contributor to <i>The New Yorker</i>, he has twice won the Thurber Prize for American Humor. He lives in Montclair, New Jersey.</p>Ian Frazierhumor-meian-frazier97800617289450061728942$25.99HardcoverHarperCollins PublishersMay 2010Humor, General<p><P><i>Humor Me</i> is a literary cavalcade of contemporary American funnymen&#151;and funnywomen&#151;of the page. Selected by the renowned humor-ist Ian Frazier and featuring more than fifty pieces of the greatest comic writing of our time, the book includes such masters of the form as Roy Blount, Jr., Bruce Jay Friedman, Veronica Geng, Jack Handey, Garrison Keillor, Steve Martin, and Calvin Trillin, as well as work by newer comic stars like Andy Borowitz, Larry Doyle, Simon Rich, George Saunders, and David Sedaris. <P>The pieces were published in the past thirty years in such popular magazines as <i>The New Yorker</i>, <i>McSweeney's</i>, <i>The Atlantic</i>, <i>National Lampoon</i>, and <i>Outside</i>. But the book also includes a handful of older comic masterpieces that nobody in need of a laugh should ever be without, among them classics by Bret Harte, Elizabeth Bishop, Donald Barthelme, and Mark Twain.</p>
68Coming of Age in America: A Multicultural AnthologyMary Frosch0<p><B>Mary Frosch</B> is also the editor of <I>Coming of Age Around the World</I> (The New Press). As a teacher at The Spence School she designed a world literature curriculum and helped implement the multicultural literature program. She divides her time between New York City and Santa Monica, California. <B>Gary Soto</B> is the author of over a dozen works of fiction and poetry. Winner of numerous prizes, including the 1985 National Book Award and a prize from the Academy of American Poets, Soto lives in Northern California.</p>Mary Frosch, Gary Sotocoming-of-age-in-americamary-frosch97815658414751565841476$16.41PaperbackNew Press, TheSeptember 2007ReprintPeoples & Cultures - American Anthologies, Ethnic & Minority Studies - United States2885.58 (w) x 8.28 (h) x 0.73 (d)<b>The acne and ecstasy of adolescence, a multicultural collection of short stories and fiction excerpts that <i>Library Journal</i> calls "wonderfully diverse from the standard fare."</b><br> <br> By turns touching and hilarious, the classic <i>Coming of Age in America</i> gathers together writers from fifteen different ethnic groups who, through their fiction, explore the terrain we all traverse as we come of age, no matter our race, ethnicity, gender, or class.<br> <br> With over twenty short stories and fiction excerpts by noted authors such as Julia Alvarez and Frank Chin, Dorothy Allison and Adam Schwartz, Reginald McNight and Tobias Wolff, <i>Coming of Age in America</i> shows that our common experiences are more binding than our differences are divisive. Since its initial publication in 1994, <i>Coming of Age in America</i> has evolved from a groundbreaking collection of underrepresented voices into a timeless album of unforgettable literature. Its editor, Mary Frosch, has since created a series of celebrated anthologies, including <i>Coming of Age Around the World</i> and the forthcoming <i>Coming of Age in the 21st Century</i>. A wonderfully readable collection, this is a marvelous resource for those looking for stories that illustrate the convergence of cultural experience and literature.<p><B>The acne and ecstasy of adolescence, a multicultural collection of short stories and fiction excerpts that <I>Library Journal</I> calls "wonderfully diverse from the standard fare."</B><BR><BR>By turns touching and hilarious, the classic <I>Coming of Age in America</I> gathers together writers from fifteen different ethnic groups who, through their fiction, explore the terrain we all traverse as we come of age, no matter our race, ethnicity, gender, or class.<BR><BR>With over twenty short stories and fiction excerpts by noted authors such as Julia Alvarez and Frank Chin, Dorothy Allison and Adam Schwartz, Reginald McNight and Tobias Wolff, <I>Coming of Age in America</I> shows that our common experiences are more binding than our differences are divisive. Since its initial publication in 1994, <I>Coming of Age in America</I> has evolved from a groundbreaking collection of underrepresented voices into a timeless album of unforgettable literature. Its editor, Mary Frosch, has since created a series of celebrated anthologies, including <I>Coming of Age Around the World</I> and the forthcoming <I>Coming of Age in the 21st Century</I>. A wonderfully readable collection, this is a marvelous resource for those looking for stories that illustrate the convergence of cultural experience and literature.</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>The 20-odd short stories and novel excerpts comprising this book are all previously published works, several from critically acclaimed authors like Tobias Wolff, Paule Marshall, and National Book Award finalist Dorothy Allison. Evocative of triumphs and tribulations we all experience during adolescence, this anthology shares needed perspectives that are wonderfully diverse from the standard fare that young adults are most often encouraged to digest. For a tiny, tempting sampling, try this beautiful description from ``Marigolds,'' Eugenia Collier's award-winning story: ``Memory is an abstract painting-it does not present things as they are but rather as they feel.'' This collection goes one better on Collier's metaphor for memory, presenting the coming-of-age years as they are and as they feel.-Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia</p><table><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Foreword</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Preface</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Jacket</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">3</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Neighborhood</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">7</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Kind of Light That Shines on Texas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">17</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Body Politic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">32</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Wrong Lunch Line</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">52</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jump or Dive</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">58</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from Bastard Out of Carolina</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">75</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Where Is It Written?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">82</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Summer Water and Shirley</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">100</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Judgment Day</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">111</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from The Floating World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">122</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Yes, Young Daddy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">139</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Going to School</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">154</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Spell of Kona Weather</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">166</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What Means Switch</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">175</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from This Boy's Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">197</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Eyes and Teeth</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">212</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Bag of Oranges</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">216</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">226</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">from Davita's Harp</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">239</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Marigolds</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">254</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Suggestions for Further Reading</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">265</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Biographical Notes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">267</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Permissions Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">272</TD></table><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>The 20-odd short stories and novel excerpts comprising this book are all previously published works, several from critically acclaimed authors like Tobias Wolff, Paule Marshall, and National Book Award finalist Dorothy Allison. Evocative of triumphs and tribulations we all experience during adolescence, this anthology shares needed perspectives that are wonderfully diverse from the standard fare that young adults are most often encouraged to digest. For a tiny, tempting sampling, try this beautiful description from ``Marigolds,'' Eugenia Collier's award-winning story: ``Memory is an abstract painting-it does not present things as they are but rather as they feel.'' This collection goes one better on Collier's metaphor for memory, presenting the coming-of-age years as they are and as they feel.-Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia </article>
69Three African-American Classics: Up from Slavery, The Souls of Black Folk and Narrative of the Life of Frederick DouglassBooker T. Washington0Booker T. Washington, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, W. E. Du Boisthree-african-american-classicsbooker-t-washington97804864575740486457575$6.63PaperbackDover PublicationsFebruary 2007Teachers - General & Miscellaneous - Biography, Slavery - Social Sciences, Civil Rights - Movements & Figures, Historical Biography - United States - 19th Century, Civil Rights - African American History, Abolitionists - Biography, Slavery & Abolitionism4485.20 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)Essential reading for students of African-American history, this collection represents&nbsp;three highly influential leaders. Washington and Douglass, both&nbsp;born into slavery, recount their rise from bondage to international recognition. Du Bois' landmark essays counsel a more aggressive approach to the civil rights movement.<p><p>Essential reading for students of African-American history, this collection represents&#160;three highly influential leaders. Washington and Douglass, both&#160;born into slavery, recount their rise from bondage to international recognition. Du Bois' landmark essays counsel a more aggressive approach to the civil rights movement.<p></p>
70100 Best African American Poems with CDNikki Giovanni6<p><P> Poet, activist, mother, and professor, Nikki Giovanni is a three-time NAACP Image Award winner and the first recipient of the Rosa Parks Woman of Courage Award, and holds the Langston Hughes Medal for Outstanding Poetry. The author of twenty-seven books and a Grammy nominee for <i>The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection</i>, she is the University Distinguished Professor/English at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, and an Oprah Living Legend.<P></i></p>Nikki Giovanni100-best-african-american-poems-with-cdnikki-giovanni97814022211181402221118$18.39Other FormatSourcebooks, IncorporatedNovember 2010Poetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies2568.40 (w) x 11.66 (h) x 0.94 (d)<p><b><i>Hear voices contemporary and classic as selected by</i></b> <b><i>New York Times</i></b> <b><i>bestselling author Nikki Giovanni</i></b></p> <p>Award-winning poet and writer Nikki Giovanni takes on the impossible task of selecting the 100 best African American works from classic and contemporary poets. Out of necessity, Giovanni admits she cheats a little, selecting a larger, less round number.</p> <p>The result is this startlingly vibrant collection that spans from historic to modern, from structured to freeform, and reflects the rich roots and visionary future of African American verse. These magnetic poems are an exciting mix of most-loved classics and daring new writing. From Gwendolyn Brooks and Langston Hughes to Tupac Shakur, Natasha Trethewey, and many others, the voice of a culture comes through in this collection, one that is as talented, diverse, and varied as its people.</p> <p>African American poems are like all other poems: beautiful, loving, provocative, thoughtful, and all those other adjectives I can think of. <i>Poems know no boundaries</i>. They, like all Earth citizens, were born in some country, grew up on some culture, then in their blooming became citizens of the Universe. <i>Poems fly from heart to heart</i>, head to head, to whisper a dream, to share a condolence, to congratulate, and to vow forever. The poems are true. They are translated and they are celebrated. They are sung, they are recited, they are <i>delightful</i>. They are neglected. They are forgotten. They are put away. Even in their fallow periods they sprout images. And fight to be revived. And spring back to life with a bit of sunshine and caring.<br> -Nikki Giovanni</p> <p class="null1"><u>Read</u></p> <ul> <li>Gwendolyn Brooks</li> <li>Kwame Alexander</li> <li>Tupac Shakur</li> <li>Langston Hughes</li> <li>Mari Evans</li> <li>Kevin Young</li> <li>Asha Bandele</li> <li>Amiri Baraka</li> </ul> <p class="null1"><u>Hear</u></p> <ul> <li>Ruby Dee</li> <li>Novella Nelson</li> <li>Nikki Giovanni</li> <li>Elizabeth Alexander</li> <li>Marilyn Nelson</li> <li>Sonia Sanchez</li> </ul> <p class="null2">And many, many, more</p> <p><b>Nikki Giovanni</b> is an award-winning poet, writer, and activist. She is the author of more than two dozen books for adults and children, including <i>Bicycles</i>, <i>Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea</i>, <i>Racism 101</i>, <i>Blues: For All the Changes</i>, and <i>Love Poems</i>. Her children's book-plus-audio compilation <i>Hip Hop Speaks to Children</i> was awarded the NAACP Image Award. Her children's book <i>Rosa</i>, a picture-book retelling of the Rosa Parks story, was a Caldecott Honor Book and winner of the Coretta Scott King Award. Both books were <i>New York Times</i> bestsellers. Nikki is a Grammy nominee for her spoken-word album <i>The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection</i> and has been nominated for the National Book Award. She has been voted Woman of the Year by <i>Essence</i>, <i>Mademoiselle</i>, and <i>Ladies' Home Journal</i>. She is a University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech, where she teaches writing and literature.</p><p>From the Introduction:</p> <p>Poems are like clouds on a June morning or two scoops of chocolate ice cream on a sugar cone in August...something everyone can enjoy. Or maybe poems are your cold feet in December on your lover's back...he is in agony but he lets your feet stay...something like that requires a bit of love. Or could it be that poems are exactly like Santa Claus...the promise, the hope, the excitement of a reward, no matter how small, for a good deed done...or a mean deed from which we refrained. The promise of tomorrow. I don't know. It seems that poems are essential. Like football to Fall, baseball to Spring, tennis to Summer, love Anytime. Something you don't think too much about until it is in Season. Then you deliciously anticipate the perfection. African American poems are like all other poems: beautiful, loving, provocative, thoughtful, and all those other adjectives I can think of.</p> <p>Poems know no boundaries. They, like all Earth citizens, were born in some country, grew up on some culture, then in their blooming became citizens of the Universe. Poems fly from heart to heart, head to head, to whisper a dream, to share a condolence, to congratulate, and to vow forever. The poems are true. They are translated and they are celebrated. They are sung, they are recited, they are delightful. They are neglected. They are forgotten. They are put away. Even in their fallow periods they sprout images. And fight to be revived. And spring back to life with a bit of sunshine and caring.</p> <p>These poems, this book, admit I cheated. The idea of <i>this</i> and no more would simply not work for me. I needed <i>these</i> plus <i>those</i>. My mother's favorite poem by Robert Hayden, plus James Weldon Johnson beginning a world that included the longing of the unfree for a loving God. My own fun "Ego Tripping" reaching to embrace Margaret Walker's "For My People." "Train Rides" and "Nikki-Rosa" read by old and loving friends. But also the newness: Novella Nelson lending that sultry voice to the youngsters; Ruby Dee bringing her brilliance to the Gwendolyn Brooks cycle. My Virginia Tech Family wanted to participate: our president Dr. Charles Steger reading "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," recognizing all our souls "have grown deep like the rivers." We celebrate our Hips; we See A Negro Lady at a birthday celebration. Our friends from James Madison University and West Virginia University came to celebrate poetry with us, too. I love these poems so much. The only other thing I would have loved is Caroline Kennedy reading "A Clean Slate."</p> <p>At the end of a loving day of laughter in Jeff Dalton's studio, when Clinton's makeup had taken forty years off some of us and twenty-five off others, we all came together with one last great cry: the Dean of our College; the Director of Honors; young, old, professional, professor, and recited in one great voice "We Real Cool." Yeah. We are. This book says Poetry Is For Everyone. What a Treat to be Snowbound with <i>The 100* Best African American Poems (*but I cheated)</i>.</p> <p>I did cheat.<br> It's true.<br> But I did not lie.</p> <p>Nikki Giovanni Poet<br> 12 December 2009</p><p>Award-winning poet and writer Nikki Giovanni takes on the difficult task of selecting the 100 best African-American works from classic and contemporary poets.</p><p>Dedication&#58; The Aunt&#58; xxi &#151; <b>Track 1</b><br> Mari Evans<p>1. For My People&#58; 1 &#151;<b> Track 2</b><br> Margaret Walker<p>2. Leroy&#58; 3<br> Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones)<p>3. Ars Poetica&#58; Nov. 7, 2008&#58; 4<br> L. Lamar Wilson<p>4. Ka'Ba&#58; 8<br> Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones)<p>5. When You Have Forgotten Sunday&#58; The Love Story&#58; 9 &#151; <b>Track 3</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks<p>6. <br> The Sermon on the Warpland&#58; 11 &#151; <b>Track 4</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks We Real Cool&#58; 12 &#151; <b>Track 5</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks<p>7. <br> Jazz Baby Is It In You&#58; 13<br> Antoine Harris<br> "I Fade Into the Night"&#58; 14<br> Adam Daniel<p>8. Old Lem&#58; 15 &#151; <b>Track 6</b><br> Sterling A. Brown<p>9. I Am Accuse of Tending to the Past&#58; 17 &#151; <b>Track 7</b><br> Lucille Clifton<p>10. I Am A Black Woman&#58; 18 &#151;<b> Track 8</b><br> Mari Evans<p>11. Who Can Be Born Black?&#58; 20 &#151; <b>Track 9</b><br> Mari Evans<p>12. Nikka-Rosa&#58;21 &#151; <b>Track 10</b><br> Nikki Giovanni<p>13. Knoxville, Tennessee&#58; 23 &#151; <b>Track 11</b><br> Nikki Giovanni<p>14. The Dry Spell&#58; 24 &#151; <b>Track 12</b><br> Kevin Young<p>15. Those Winter Sundays&#58; 26 &#151; <b>Tracks 13 & 14</b><br> Robert Hayden<p>16. Frederic Douglass&#58; 27<br> Robert Hayden<p>17. The Negro Speaks of Rivers&#58; 28 &#151; <b>Track 15</b><br> Langston Hughes<p>18. Choosing the Blues&#58; 29<br> Angela Jackson<p>19. My Father's Love Letters&#58; 30<br> Yusef Komunyakaa<p>20. The Creation&#58; 32 &#151; <b>Track 16</b><br> James Weldon Johnson<p>21. A Negro Love Song&#58; 36<br> Paul Laurence Dunbar<p>22. Lift Every Voice and Sing&#58; 37<br> James Weldon Johnson<p>23. Go Down Death&#58; 39<br> James Weldon Johnson<p>24. Between Ourselves&#58; 42<br> Audre Lorde<p>25. The Union of Two&#58; 45<br> Haki R. Madhubuti<p>26. Ballad of Birmingham&#58; 46<br> Dudley Randall<p>27. A Poem to Complement Other Poems&#58; 48<br> Haki R. Madhubuti<p>28. No Images&#58; 51<br> Waring Cuney<p>29. Between the World and Me&#58; 52<br> Richard Wright<p>30. Theme for English B&#58; 54<br> Langston Hughes<p><b><i><u>31. Harlem Suite</u></i></b><br> Easy Boogie&#58; 56<br> Langston Hughes Dream Boogie&#58; 57<br> Langston Hughes Dream Boogie&#58; Variation&#58; 58<br> Langston Hughes Harlem&#58; 58<br> Langston Hughes Good Morning&#58; 59<br> Langston Hughes Same in Blues&#58; 60<br> Langston Hughes Island&#58; 61<br> Langston Hughes<p>32. The Blue Terrance&#58; 62<br> Terrance Hayes<p>33.<br> The Mother&#58; 64 &#151; <b>Track 17</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks A Bronzeville Mother Loiters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, a Mississippi Mother Burns Bacon&#58; 66<br> Gwendolyn Brooks &#151; <b>Track 18</b><br> The Last Quatrain of the Ballad of Emmett Till&#58; 72<br> Gwendolyn Brooks A Sunset of the City&#58; 73 &#151; <b>Track 19</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks<p>34. Things I Carried Coming to the World&#58; 75<br> Remica L. Bingham<p>35. Topography&#58; 77<br> Remica L. Bingham<p>36. Beneath Me&#58; 79<br> Jericho Brown<p>37. Autobiography&#58; 80<br> Jericho Brown<p>38. Parable of the Sower&#58; 82<br> Pamela Sneed<p>39. Heritage&#58; 86<br> Countee Cullen<p>40. Yet I Do Marvel&#58; 91 &#151; <b>Track 20</b><br> Countee Cullen<p>41. Incident&#58; 92 &#151; <b>Track 21</b><br> Countee Cullen<p>42. We Wear the Mask&#58; 93 &#151; <b>Track 22</b><br> Paul Laurence Dunbar<p>43. Triple&#58; 94<br> Georgia Douglas Johnson<p>44. The Heart of a Woman&#58; 95 &#151; <b>Track 23</b><br> Georgia Douglas Johnson<p>45. Woman With Flower&#58; 96<br> Naomi Long Madgett<p>46. The Idea of Ancestry&#58; 97<br> Etheridge Knight<p>47. Don't Say Goodbye to the Porkpie Hat&#58; 99<br> Larry Neal<p>48. Cleaning&#58; 105<br> Camille T. Dungy<p>49. Boston Year&#58; 106 &#151; <b>Track 24</b><br> Elizabeth Alexander<p>50. She Wears Red&#58; 107<br> Jackie Warren-Moore<p>51. Commercial Break&#58; Road-Runner, Uneasy&#58; 110<br> Tim Seibles<p>52. Before Making Love&#58; 114<br> Toi Derricotte<p>53. Be-Bop&#58; 115<br> Sterling Plumpp<p>54. Personal Letter No. 3&#58; 116 &#151; <b>Track 25</b><br> Sonia Sanchez<p>55. Poem at Thirty&#58; 117 &#151; <b>Track 26</b><br> Sonia Sanchez<p>56. A Poem for Sterling Brown&#58; 118 &#151; <b>Track 27</b><br> Sonia Sanchez<p>57. Marchers Headed for Washington, Baltimore, 1963&#58; 120<br> Remica L. Bingham<p>58. And Yeah...This is a Love Poem&#58; 123<br> Nikki Giovanni<p>59. The Carousel&#58; 123<br> Gloria C. Oden<p>60. Only Everything I Own&#58; 127<br> Patricia Smith<p>61. Lot's Daughter Dreams of Her Mother&#58; 128 &#151; <b>Track 28</b><br> Opal Moore<p>62. The Girlfriend's Train&#58; 131<br> Nikky Finney<p>63. Back from the Arms of Big Mama&#58; 136<br> Afaa Michael Weaver<p>64. Mama's Promise&#58; 139 &#151; <b>Track 29</b><br> Marilyn Nelson<p>65. Bop&#58; A Whistling Man&#58; 142<br> Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon<p>66. Homage to My Hips&#58; 144 &#151; <b>Track 30</b><br> Lucille Clifton<p>67. Train Ride&#58; 145<br> Kwame Dawes<p>68. Train Rides&#58; 148 &#151; <b>Track 31</b><br> Nikki Giovanni<p>69. A Great Grandaddy Speaks&#58; 153<br> Lamonte B. Steptoe<p>70. Eddie Priest's Barbershop & Notary&#58; 154<br> Kevin Young<p>71. View of the Library of Congress From Paul Laurence Dunbar High School&#58; 156<br> Thomas Sayers Ellis<p>72. Drapery Factory, Gulfport, Mississippi, 1956&#58; 159 &#151; <b>Track 32</b><br> Natasha Trethewey<p>73. Some Kind of Crazy&#58; 161<br> Major Jackson<p>74. From&#58; 163<br> A. Van Jordan<p>75. Freedom Candy&#58; 165<br> E. Ethelbert Miller<p>76. The Supremes&#58; 167<br> Cornelius Eady<p><b><i><u>77. Jazz Suite</u></i></b><br> Nikki Save Me&#58; 169<br> Michael Scott<br> "Nikki, If You Were a Song..."&#58; 170 &#151; <b>Track 33</b><br> Kwame Alexander Haiku&#58; 170<br> DJ Renegade Untitled&#58; 170<br> Nadir Lasana Bomani<br> "I Wish I Could've Seen It..."&#58; 171<br> Leodis McCray<p>78. That Some Mo'&#58; 174<br> DJ Renegade<p>79. Sometime in the Summer There's October&#58; 175<br> Kwame Alexander<p>80. Dancing Naked on the Floor&#58; 178<br> Kwame Alexander<p>81. Harriet Tubman's Email 2 Master&#58; 180<br> Truth Thomas<p>82. A River That Flows Forever&#58; 181 &#151; <b>Track 34</b><br> Tupac Shakur<p>83. The Rose that Grew from Concrete&#58; 181 &#151; <b>Track 34</b><br> Tupac Shakur<p>84. Rochelle&#58; 182<br> Reuben Jackson<p>85. All Their Stanzas Look Alike&#58; 183<br> Thomas Sayers Ellis<p>86. From the Center to the Edge&#58; 185<br> Asha Bandele<p>87. The Subtle Art of Breathing&#58; 187<br> Asha Bandele<p>88. Southern University, 1963&#58; 192<br> Kevin Young<p>89. Poetry Should Ride the Bus&#58; 195<br> Ruth Forman<p>90. Blues for Spring&#58; 197<br> Colleen J. McElroy<p>91. The Bicycle Wizard&#58; 198<br> Sharon Strange<p>92. Bicycles&#58; 199<br> Nikki Giovanni<p>93. A Clean Slate&#58; 200<br> Fred D'Aguiar<p>94. Song Through the Wall&#58; 201<br> Akua Lezli Hope<p>95. A Seat Saved&#58; 203<br> Shana Yarborough<p>96. Sunday Greens&#58; 205<br> Rita Dove<p>97. The Untitled Superhero Poem&#58; 206<br> Tonya Maria Matthews<p>98. Mercy Killing&#58; 209 &#151; <b>Track 35</b><br> Remica L. Bingham<p>99. If You Saw a Negro Lady&#58; 210<br> June Jordan<p>100. Ego Tripping (There May Be a Reason Why)&#58; 212 &#151; <b>Track 36</b><br> Nikki Giovanni<p><article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4><p>In this multimedia anthology, editor Nikki Giovanni brings together the words and sounds of one hundred superlative African American poems from Phillis Wheatley to the present. This book and CD package can be beginning of a lifetime's conversation with inspiring poetry.</p> </article>
71Six American Poets: An AnthologyJoel Conarroe0<p><P>The author of books and essays about American poetry and fiction and the editor <b>Six American Poets</b>, Joel Conarroe is president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, which awards fellowships to artists and scholars. He has previously served as chairman of the English department and dean of arts and sciences at the University of Pennsylvania and as executive director fo the Modern Language Association. He has earned degrees from Davidson College, Cornell University, and New York University, and has been awarded honorary doctorates by several institutions.</p>Joel Conarroesix-american-poetsjoel-conarroe97806797452590679745254$12.24PaperbackKnopf Doubleday Publishing GroupDecember 19931st Vintage Books edPoetry, American Literature Anthologies, Anthologies3205.17 (w) x 7.96 (h) x 0.65 (d)<p>Here are the most enduring works of six great American poets, collected in a single authoritative volume. From the overflowing pantheism of Walt Whitman to the exquisite precision of Emily Dickinson; from the democratic clarity of William Carlos Williams to the cerebral luxuriance of Wallace Stevens; and from Robert Frost's deceptively homespun dramatic monologues to Langston Hughes's exuberant jazz-age lyrics, this anthology presents the best work of six makers of the modern American poetic tradition. <b>Six American Poets</b> includes 247 poems, among them such famous masterpieces as "I Hear America Singing," "The Idea of Order at Key West," "The Dance," and "Mending Wall," as well as lesser-known works. With perceptive introductory essays by the distinguished scholar Joel Conarroe and selections that capture the distinctive voices and visions of its authors, this volume is an invaluable addition to any poetry library.</p><p><P>Here are the most enduring works of six great American poets, collected in a single authoritative volume. From the overflowing pantheism of Walt Whitman to the exquisite precision of Emily Dickinson; from the democratic clarity of William Carlos Williams to the cerebral luxuriance of Wallace Stevens; and from Robert Frost's deceptively homespun dramatic monologues to Langston Hughes's exuberant jazz-age lyrics, this anthology presents the best work of six makers of the modern American poetic tradition. <b>Six American Poets</b> includes 247 poems, among them such famous masterpieces as &quot;I Hear America Singing,&quot; &quot;The Idea of Order at Key West,&quot; &quot;The Dance,&quot; and &quot;Mending Wall,&quot; as well as lesser-known works. With perceptive introductory essays by the distinguished scholar Joel Conarroe and selections that capture the distinctive voices and visions of its authors, this volume is an invaluable addition to any poetry library.</p><h3>Publishers Weekly</h3><p>A collection of famous and lesser-known poems by Whitman, Dickinson, Williams, Stevens, Frost and Hughes. (Dec.)</p><article> <h4>Publishers Weekly - <span class="author">Publisher's Weekly</span> </h4>A collection of famous and lesser-known poems by Whitman, Dickinson, Williams, Stevens, Frost and Hughes. (Dec.) </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>Unlike most recent anthologies of American poetry--which, because they are directed largely at an audience of other poets, strive frantically to be as inclusive as possible--Conarroe's selection aims at ``the general reader interested in being introduced, in an unhurried way, to some major voices.'' Selections are from America's greatest and most representative poets: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, and Langston Hughes. Though one may cavil at particular omissions or inclusions, especially the practice of excerpting Whitman's ``Song of Myself,'' Conarroe's anthology is a superb introduction to the pleasures of poetry for the general reader. The fine introduction and prefaces provide added assistance to those who, starting here, will doubtlessly want to continue ex ploring poetry. Highly recommended. BOMC selection.-- Frank J. Lepkowski, Oakland Univ., Rochester, Mich. </article>
72Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in EnglishSandra M. Gilbert0<p><b>Sandra M. Gilbert</b> is the author of numerous volumes of criticism and poetry, as well as a memoir. She is coeditor (with Susan Gubar) of <i>The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women</i>. A Distinguished Professor of English emerita at the University of California, Davis, she lives in Berkeley, California.<P><b>Susan Gubar</b> (Ph.D. University of Iowa) is a Distinguished Professor at Indiana University, where she has won numerous teaching awards, most recently the Faculty Mentor Award from the Indiana University Graduate and Professional Student Organization. In addition to her critical collaboration with Sandra Gilbert, she is the author of <b>Racechanges&#58; White Skin, Black Face in American Culture</b> (1997), <b>Critical Condition&#58; Feminism at the Turn of the Century</b> (2000), <b>Poetry After Auschwitz&#58; Remembering What One Never Knew</b> (2003), and <b>Rooms of Our Own</b> (2006), and editor of the first annotated edition of Woolf's <b>A Room of One's Own</b> (2005).</p>Sandra M. Gilbert (Editor), Norton, Susan Gubar, Susan Gubarnorton-anthology-of-literature-by-womensandra-m-gilbert97803939301530393930157$70.64PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.February 20073rd EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies, Anthologies24526.00 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 3.30 (d)Long the standard teaching anthology, the landmark Norton Anthology of Literature by Women has introduced generations of readers to the rich variety of women’s writing in English. Now, the much-anticipated Third Edition responds to the wealth of writing by women across the globe with the inclusion of 61 new authors (219 in all) whose diverse works span six centuries. A more flexible two-volume format and a versatile new companion reader make the Third Edition an even better teaching tool.<p>Long the standard teaching anthology, the landmark <b>Norton Anthology of Literature by Women</b> has introduced generations of readers to the rich variety of women&rsquo;s writing in English.</p>
73Multicultural Children's Literature: Through the Eyes of Many ChildrenDonna E. Norton0Donna E. Nortonmulticultural-childrens-literaturedonna-e-norton97801351452890135145287$46.00PaperbackPrentice HallMarch 20083rd EditionLiterary Criticism, Children's Literature<p><P>This book includes both a large source for and section on how to use multicultural literature with students, as well as the latest in research and issues related to the topic. The materials noted in the book are both authentic and non-stereotyped. The book develops techniques that encourage higher thought processes, helping adults evaluate literature to determine authenticity and an understanding of the various cultures.</p><P><b><p>1. Introduction to Multicultural Literature<p></b>Developing a Study of Multicultural Literature<p>Availability of High Quality Multicultural Literature<p><b><p>2. African American Literature<p></b>Issues Related to African American Literature<p>Changing Availability of Quality Literature<p>Authors Who Write and Illustrate African American Literature<p>Traditional Literature<p>Historical Nonfiction and Fiction<p>African American Poetry<p>Involving Children with African American Literature<p><b><p>3. Native American Literature<p></b>Authors Who Write and Illustrate Native American Literature<p>Issues Related to Native American Literature<p>Traditional Literature<p>Historical Nonfiction and Fiction<p>Native American Poetry<p>Contemporary Realistic Fiction<p>Nonfiction Informational Books<p>Involving Children with Native American Literature<p><b><p>4. Latino Literature<p></b>Historical Perspectives<p>Authors Who Write and Illustrate Latino Literature<p>Values in Latino Culture<p>Folklore<p>Historical Nonfiction and Fiction<p>Contemporary Realistic Fiction and Nonfiction<p>Involving Children with Latino Literature<p><b><p>5. Asian Literature<p></b>Values That Are Part of the Cultures<p>Concerns Over Stereotypes in Literature from the Past<p>Asian Folklore<p>Early History of the People and the Culture<p>Poetry<p>Contemporary Literature with Asian Roots<p>Involving Children with Asian Literature<p>Visualizing Chinese Art<p>Writing Connections with Asian Literature<p><b><p>6. Jewish Literature<p></b>What Does It Mean to Be Jewish?<p>Folklore and Ancient Stories of the Jewish People<p>Early History of the Jewish People<p>Applying Knowledge Gained About Jewish Folklore<p>Years of Emigration and Immigration<p>The Holocaust in Children&#39;s and Young Adult Literature<p>Jewish Poetry<p>Contemporary Jewish Literature<p>Involving Children with Jewish Literature<p><b><p>7. Middle Eastern Literature<p></b>Historical Perspectives<p>Authors Who Write and Illustrate Middle Eastern Literature<p>Values Identified in the Culture and Literature<p>Folklore and Ancient Stories from the Middle East<p>Early History<p>Contemporary Literature with Middle Eastern Roots<p>Involving Children with Middle Eastern Literature<p>Visualizing Middle Eastern Art<p>Writing Connections with Middle Eastern Literature<p>
74The Voice That Is Great within Us: American Poetry of the Twentieth CenturyHayden Carruth0Hayden Carruth, Susan Kagen Podellthe-voice-that-is-great-within-ushayden-carruth97805532626360553262637$8.40Mass Market PaperbackRandom House Publishing GroupSeptember 1983ReprintPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies7684.15 (w) x 6.85 (h) x 1.25 (d)This famous anthology includes the works of more than 130 major American poets of the modern period--Robert Frost, Paul Goodman, Carl Sandburg and Gwendolyn Brooks among them--along with short biographies of each.<b>ROBERT FROST (1875-1963)</b> <p>Born in San Francisco, Frost moved to New England ten years later upon the death of his father, and in effect remained there the rest of his life, becoming the New Englander par excellence of his age. Yet his early life was not notably successful. Twice interrupted in attempts to secure a college degree, he farmed for a while in New Hampshire, worked as a mill hand, a schoolteacher, a newspaperman. His first poem was published in 1894; but during the next twenty years his work was consistently rejected by American editors.</p> <p>Finally, discouraged but still determined, Frost went to England in 1912, and there won the support of influential poets and critics, including Ezra Pound. His first two books, <b>A Boy's Will</b> (1913) and <b>North of Boston</b> (1914), were published in London. In 1915 he returned to America. Thereafter his success was unquestioned: he won many honors, including four Pulitzer Prizes for poetry, and became not only the most popular serious poet in the country but one of the most generally respected among fellow writers. Frost's poetic practice was based on what he called "sentence sounds," the natural tones and rhythms of speech cast loosely against standard poetic forms. Conventional as it may seem today, it was a new departure in its time, making Frost a distinctly modern poet. Similarly his combination of Emersonian spiritual aspiration with back-country Yankee pragmatism placed him squarely among his contemporaries, to whom his metaphysically probing Iyrics and narratives, sometimes cynical or playful but often genuinely anguished, spoke with force. These factors, together with his superb poetic gift, make him dominant in the American tradition, a figure with whom younger poets, even the most rebellious, must come to terms.</p> <p><b>Complete Poems of Robert Frost</b>. Holt, Rinehart &amp; Winston, 1949 ff.</p> <p>MENDING WALL</p> <p>Something there is that doesn't love a wall,<br> That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,<br> And spills the upper boulders in the sun;<br> And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.<br> The work of hunters is another thing:<br> I have come after them and made repair Where they have left not one stone on a stone,<br> But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,<br> To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,<br> No one has seen them made or heard them made,<br> But at spring mending-time we find them there.<br> I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;<br> And on a day we meet to walk the line And set the wall between us once again.<br> We keep the wall between us as we go.<br> To each the boulders that have fallen to each.<br> And some are loaves and some so nearly balls We have to use a spell to make them balance:<br> 'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'<br> We wear our fingers rough with handling them.<br> Oh, just another kind of outdoor game,<br> One on a side. It comes to little more:<br> There where it is we do not need the wall:<br> He is all pine and I am apple orchard.<br> My apple trees will never get across And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.<br> He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors.'<br> Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder If I could put a notion in his head:<br> <i>'Why</i> do they make good neighbors? Isn't it Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.<br> Before I built a wall I'd ask to know What I was walling in or walling out,<br> And to whom I was like to give offense.<br> Something there is that doesn't love a wall That wants it down.' I could say 'E1ves' to him,<br> But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather He said it for himself. I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.<br> He moves in darkness as it seems to me,<br> Not of woods only and the shade of trees.<br> He will not go behind his father's saying,<br> And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, 'Good fences make good neighbors.'</p> <p class="null1">CARL SANDBURG (1878-1967)</p> <p>The son of Swedish immigrants, Sandburg grew up in Galesburg, Ill., a railroad town, where he attended school until he was thirteen, then dropped out and wandered for years through the West and Midwest, working at varied jobs. He served in the Spanish-American War and for a while attended college. Finally he settled in Milwaukee, where he married, became a Socialist and a newspaperman, and began devoting himself seriously to poetry. In 1913 he moved to Chicago. Harriet Monroe, founder of <i>Poetry,</i> gave his work a prominent place in her magazine, where it attracted attention for its robust and Whitmanesque freedom. Two books, <b>Chicago Poetry</b> (1916) and <b>Cornhuskers</b> (1918), assured his reputation. During the twenties and thirties Sandburg toured widely, lecturing, reading his poems, singing and collecting folk songs, playing his guitar. His two collections, <b>The American Songbag</b> (1927) and <b>The New American Songbag</b> (1950), are important contributions to folklore. At the same time he became deeply interested in the life and achievement of Abraham Lincoln, and spent many years in producing a multi-volume biography. In addition his works include several first-rate books for children (the Rootabaga series), novels, autobiographies, screen plays, and much journalism. Sandburg's poetry was scorned during his middle and later life by the European-oriented critics of the time, and in part rightly so; he wrote too much and too facilely. But some of his early poems have a fresh vision and incantatory vigor that remain firm. In style, attitude, and temperament, he was closer to the young poets of today than most of them recognize.</p> <p><b>Complete Poems</b>. Harcourt, Brace, 1950.</p> <p>CHICAGO</p> <p>Hog Butcher for the World,<br> Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,<br> Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler; Stormy, husky, brawling,<br> City of the Big Shoulders:<br> They tell me you are wicked and I believe them, for I have seen your painted women under the gas lamps hiring the farm boys.<br> And they tell me you are crooked and I answer: Yes, it is true I have seen the gunman kill and go free to kill again.<br> And they tell me you are brutal and my reply is: On the faces of women and children I have seen the marks of wanton hunger.<br> And having answered so I turn once more to those who sneer at this my city, and I give them back the sneer and say to them:<br> Come and show me another city with lifted head singing so proud to be alive and coarse and strong and cunning.<br> Flinging magnetic curses amid the toil of piling job on job, here is a tall bold slugger set vivid against the little soft cities;<br> Fierce as a dog with tongue lapping for action, cunning as a savage pitted against the wilderness,<br> Bareheaded,<br> Shoveling,<br> Wrecking,<br> Planning,<br> Building, breaking, rebuilding,<br> Under the smoke, dust all over his mouth, laughing with white teeth,<br> Under the terrible burden of destiny laughing as a young man laughs,<br> Laughing even as an ignorant fighter laughs who has never lost a battle,<br> Bragging and laughing that under his wrist is the pulse, and under his ribs the heart of the people,<br> Laughing!<br> Laughing the stormy, husky, brawling laughter of Youth, half-naked, sweating, proud to be Hog Butcher, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat, Player with Railroads and Freight Handler to the Nation.</p> <p class="null1">WALLACE STEVENS (1879-1955)</p> <p>Stevens determined, early in life, to create a life-style that would accommodate his first vocation, poetry. The course he chose would have seemed paradoxical to many, but not to him. He studied law, entered the insurance business at Hartford, Conn., and spent a number of years working upward to an executive position and a life of affluence. Consequently his first book, <b>Harmonium</b> (1923), did not appear until he was forty-three years old; but then it made an immediate hit. Many of its poems became favorites: "Hibiscus on the Sleeping Shores," "Sunday Morning," "The Emperor of Ice-Cream," "Tea at the Palaz of Hoon," "Sea Surface Full of Clouds," etc. They were as exotic as their titles; full of tropical imagery and unusual diction, armored in brilliant stylized rhetoric; but despite their ornamentation they dealt with disturbing themes, particularly man's attempt to find, or create, meaning in a universe from which the spiritual rationale had apparently departed. For Stevens, the way lay through aesthetic experience; yet he was never merely willing to substitute art for reality. The real world, he insisted, was the "necessary angel" who announced to imaginative man the plenitude of hie. As his books succeeded one another, perceptive readers saw that although the famous stylization of the early poems had moderated, the new work was more exact, better integrated, and more profoundly felt. Indeed some of Stevens's most moving poems, written in his last years, were not published until after his death, in a volume which also contains bis "Adagia", brilliant prose aphorisms and philosophical aperçus. No other poetry of the twentieth century has been more consistently, flawlessly individual; none has been more attractive; none has been harder to imitate. Hence the influence of Stevens on younger poets, though pervasive, has been indirect.</p> <p><b>The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens</b>. Knopf, 1954.<br> <b>Opus Posthumous</b>. Ed. Samuel French Morse. Knopf, 1957.<br> <b>The Necessary Angel</b>. (Essays.) Knopf, 1951.<br> <b>Selected Letters of Wallace Stevens</b>. Ed Holly Stevens. Knopf, 1966.</p> <p>THE HOUSE WAS QUIET AND THE WORLD WAS CALM</p> <p>The house was quiet and the world was calm.<br> The reader became the book; and summer night</p> <p>Was like the conscious being of the book.<br> The house was quiet and the world was calm.</p> <p>The words were spoken as if there was no book,<br> Except that the reader leaned above the page,</p> <p>Wanted to lean, wanted much most to be The scholar to whom his book is true, to whom</p> <p>The summer night is like a perfection of thought.<br> The house was quiet because it had to be.</p> <p>The quiet was part of the meaning, part of the mind:<br> The access of perfection to the page.</p> <p>And the world was calm. The truth in a calm world,<br> In which there is no other meaning, itself</p> <p>Is calm, itself is summer and night, itself Is the reader leasing late and reading there.</p> <p>"Mending Wall" by Robert Frost. From <b>Complete Poems of Robert Frost</b>. Copyright © 1916, 1923 by Holt, Rinehart &amp; Winston, Inc. Copyright © 1936, 1942 by Robert Frost. Copyright © 1964 by Leslie Frost Ballantine. Reprinted by permission of Holt, Rinehart &amp; Winston, Inc.</p> <p>"Chicago" by Carl Sandburg. From <b>Chicago Poems</b>. Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart &amp; Winston, Inc. Copyright © by Carl Sandburg. Reprinted by permission of Holt, Rinehart &amp; Winston, Inc.</p> <p>"The House Was Quiet and the World Was Calm" by Wallace Stevens. From <b>The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens</b>. Copyright © 1942, 1947 by Wallace Stevens. Reprinted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.</p><p>This famous anthology includes the works of more than 130 major American poets of the modern period--Robert Frost, Paul Goodman, Carl Sandburg and Gwendolyn Brooks among them--along with short biographies of each.</p>
75Poems That Touch the HeartA.L. Alexander0A.L. Alexander, A. L. Alexander (Introduction), A. L. Alexanderpoems-that-touch-the-hearta-l-alexander97803850440110385044011$14.99HardcoverKnopf Doubleday Publishing GroupOctober 1984ENLARGEDPoetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies, Inspirational & Religious Poetry - General & Miscellaneous4645.79 (w) x 8.54 (h) x 1.55 (d)<p>With over 650,000 copies in print, <i>Poems That Touch The Heart</i> is America's most popular collection of inspirational verse.</p>
76I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story ProjectPaul Auster7<p>Paul Auster's unique novels are often like Chinese boxes, continually opening further to reveal new layers. He approaches his writing as he has approached his life, to an extent: as something of a nomad in a perpetually changing, mysterious landscape.</p>Paul Auster, Nelly Reifleri-thought-my-father-was-godpaul-auster97803124210070312421001$12.29PaperbackPicadorSeptember 2002REVShort Story Anthologies, Historical Biography - United States - General & Miscellaneous, World History - General & Miscellaneous, American Literature Anthologies4165.50 (w) x 8.31 (h) x 0.76 (d)<p>The true-life stories in this unique collection provide "a window into the American mind and heart" (<i>The Daily News</i>). One hundred and eighty voices - male and female, young and old, from all walks of life and all over the country - talk intimately to the reader. Combining great humor and pathos this remarkable selection of stories from the thousands submitted to NPR's <i>Weekend All Things Considered</i> National Story Project gives the reader a glimpse of America's soul in all its diversity.</p><p>I told the listeners that I was looking for stories. The stories had to be true, and they had to be short, but there would be no restrictions as to subject matter or style. What interested me most, I said, were stories that defied our expectations of the world, anecdotes that revealed the mysterious and unknowable forces at work in our lives, in our family histories, in our minds and bodies, in our souls . . . I was hoping to put together an archive of facts, a museum of American reality.</p> <p>More than ever, I have come to appreciate how deeply and passionately most of us live within ourselves. Our attachments are ferocious. Our loves overwhelm us, define us, obliterate the boundaries between ourselves and others. —from the Prologue</p> <p>So there was Mr. Bernhauser yelling at us to get the hell out of his tree, and my father asked him what the problem was. Mr. Bernhauser took a deep breath and launched into a diatribe about thieving kids, breakers of rules, takers of fruit, and monsters in general. I guess my father had had enough, for the next thing he did was shout at Mr. Bernhauser and tell him to drop dead. Mr. Bernhauser stopped screaming, looked at my father, turned bright red, then purple, grabbed his chest, turned gray, and slowly folded to the ground. I thought my father was God. That he could yell at a miserable old man and make him die on command was beyond my comprehension. —Robert Winnie Bonners Ferry, Idaho</p><p>A truly captivating collection of 180 real stories written by NPR radio listeners&#151;stories that, in editor Paul Auster's words, defy "our expectations about the world and reveal[ed] the mysterious and unknowable forces at work in our lives." <P>Annotation &copy; Book News, Inc., Portland, OR</p><h3>Book Magazine</h3><p>Two years ago, on National Public Radio's "Weekend All Things Considered," Auster introduced the National Story Project. In an attempt "to put together an archive of facts, a museum of American reality," he welcomed anyone to submit a story, following two rules: it must be true and it must be short. This book collects 179 stories-Auster calls them "reports from the frontlines of personal experience"-picked from over 4,000 entries. There is the unassuming yet beautiful portrait of a summer afternoon in a 1960s Manhattan neighborhood; the story of a man given leave after fifteen years in prison to attend his grandmother's funeral; and a homeless woman's account of her living situation. There are impossible coincidences, eerie omens and visions, and tales of love and war and family and death. <BR> Ted Waitt <BR> <BR></p><TABLE><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Chicken</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">3</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rascal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">4</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Yellow Butterfly</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">6</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Python</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">7</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pooh</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">9</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">New York Stray</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">11</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pork Chop</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">12</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">B</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">14</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Two Loves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">16</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rabbit Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">17</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Carolina</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">19</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Andy and the Snake</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">21</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Blue Skies</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">24</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Exposure</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">25</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Vertigo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">27</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Star and Chain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">33</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Radio Gypsy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">34</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Bicycle Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">36</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Grandmother's China</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">39</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Bass</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">41</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mother's Watch</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">44</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Case Closed</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">46</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Photo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">47</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">MS. Found in an Attic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">49</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tempo Primo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">50</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Lesson Not Learned</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">52</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Family Christmas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">52</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Rocking Chair</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">55</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Unicycle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Moccasins</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">59</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Striped Pen</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">61</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Doll</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">63</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Videotape</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">66</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Purse</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">68</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Gift of Gold</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">70</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rainout</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">75</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Isolation</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">76</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Connections</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">78</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Wednesday Before Christmas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">80</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">How My Father Lost His Job</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">82</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Danny Kowalski</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Revenge</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">87</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Chris</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">89</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Put Your Little Foot</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">92</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Aunt Myrtle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">95</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">American Odyssey</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">97</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Plate of Peas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Wash Guilt</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">101</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Double Sadness</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">103</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Picture of Life</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">106</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Margie</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">109</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">One Thousand Dollars</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">111</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Taking Leave</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">114</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Act of Memory</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">120</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bicoastal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">125</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Felt Fedora</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">126</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Man vs. coat</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">127</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">That's Entertainment</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">128</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Cake</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">129</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Riding With Andy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">131</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sophisticated Lady</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">132</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My First Day in Priest Clothes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">133</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jewish Cowboy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">134</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">How to Win Friends and Influence People</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">135</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Your Father Has the Hay Fever</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">136</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lee Ann and Holly Ann</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">139</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Why I Am Antifur</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">140</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Airport Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">142</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tears and Flapdoodle</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">144</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Club Car</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">146</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bronx Cheer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">148</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">One Day in Higley</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">150</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dancing on Seventy-fourth Street</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">153</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Conversation with Bill</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">154</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Greyhounding</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">156</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Little Story about New York</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">159</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Mistake</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">162</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">No Forwarding Address</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">164</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The New Girl</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Iceman of Market Street</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">168</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Me and the Babe</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">171</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lives of the Poets</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">172</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Land of the Lost</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">173</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rainbow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">175</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rescued by God</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">177</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">179</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Small World</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">183</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Christmas Morning, 1949</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">186</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Brooklyn Roberts</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">188</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">$1,380 per Night, Double Occupancy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">190</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Shot in the Light</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">195</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Snow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">202</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Fastest Man in the Union Army</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">207</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Christmas, 1862</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mount Grappa</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">210</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Savenay</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">212</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fifty Years Later</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">213</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">He Was the Same Age as My Sister</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">214</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Betting on Uncle Louie</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">216</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Ten-Goal Player</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">218</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Last Hand</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">220</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">August 1945</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">222</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">One Autumn Afternoon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">224</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Thought My Father Was God</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">226</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Celebration</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">228</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Christmas, 1945</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">230</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Trunk Full of Memories</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">232</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Walk in the Sun</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">235</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Shot in the Dark</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">237</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Confessions of a Mouseketeer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">239</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Forever</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">241</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Utah, 1975</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">243</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What If?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">247</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Mysteries of Tortellini</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">249</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Involuntary Assistant</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">251</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Plot</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">253</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mathematical Aphrodisiac</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">255</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Table for Two</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">257</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Suzy's Choosy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">259</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Top Button</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">260</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lace Gloves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">262</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Susan's Greetings</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">263</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Edith</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">264</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Souls Fly Away</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">267</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Awaiting Delivery</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">269</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Day Paul and I Flew the Kite</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">270</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Lesson in Love</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">272</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ballerina</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">274</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Fortune Cookie</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">276</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Ashes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">279</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Harrisburg</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">281</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Something to Think About</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">283</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Good Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">285</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Charlie the Tree Killer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">287</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dead Man's Bluff</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Best Friend</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">290</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Didn't Know</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">291</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cardiac Arrests</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">293</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Grandmother's Funeral</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">294</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">High Street</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">296</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Failed Execution</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">297</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Ghost</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">299</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Heart Surgery</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">301</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Crying Place</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">302</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lee</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">303</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">South Dakota</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">305</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Connecting with Phil</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">308</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Letter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">310</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dress Rehearsal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">312</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Anonymous Deciding Factor</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">315</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">4:05 a.m</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">319</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the Middle of the Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">320</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Blood</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">321</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">T321 Interpretation of Dreams</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">322</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Half-Ball</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">323</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Friday Night</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">325</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Farrell</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">327</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Jill"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">329</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">D-day</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">330</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Wall</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">331</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Heaven</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">333</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Father's Dream</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">335</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Parallel Lives</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Anna May</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">340</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Long Time Gone</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">342</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sewing Lessons</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">347</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sunday Drive</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">350</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mayonnaise Sandwiches</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">354</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Seaside</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">355</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">After a Long Winter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">358</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Martini with a Twist</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">359</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nowhere</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">362</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Where in the World Is Era Rose Rodosta?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">363</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Peter</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">365</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Early Arithmetic</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">368</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Reflections on a Hubcap</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">371</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Homeless in Prescott</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">373</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Being There</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">376</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Average Sadness</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">378</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index of Authors</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">381</TD></TABLE><article> <h4>From Barnes & Noble</h4>Famed author Paul Auster presents 180 of the "true tales" from National Public Radio's monthly National Story Project series. The vividly personal biographies come from men and women of every conceivable background and cover more than 40 U.S. states. The accounts are short but powerful; they include everything from amusing misunderstandings to heartbreakingly tragic moments. The result is nothing less than what Auster himself describes as "an archive of facts, a museum of American reality." </article> <article> <h4>From the Publisher</h4><p>“A powerful book, one in which strangers share with you their darkest secrets, their happiest memories, their fears, their regrets. To read these essays is to look into hearts, to see life from other viewpoints, to live vicariously.” —<i>The Boston Globe</i></p> <p>“Unforgettable testimonials of human resilience. Moving and amusing dispatches from across America.” —<i>Us Weekly</i> (starred review)</p> <p>“Human foibles and frailties, laughter and tears...We are all hearing—and telling—stories all the time, especially now, in these days when life itself seems so fragile and precious. But Paul Auster’s wonderful efforts, choosing these fine stories, have given us a timely and invaluable reminder of what it means to listen—to really listen—to America talking.” —<i>The Times-Picayune</i> (New Orleans)</p> <p>“Finally, a bathroom book worthy of Pulitzer consideration: the one-to-three-page stories gathered in this astonishing, addictive collection are absolute gems.” —<i>Publishers Weekly</i> (starred review)</p> <p>“It is difficult to think of another book published this year, and probably any book to be published next year, that is so simple and so obvious, so excellent in intention and so elegant in its execution, and which displays such wisdom and such knowledge of human life in all its varieties. It is also difficult to think of a book that is so stark a reminder that human experience can be horrid and utterly unbelievable, and which therefore answers so precisely to our current needs and circumstances.”—<i>The Guardian</i> (UK)</p> <p>“As this collection ably proves, we all shape experience into stories, and Auster has done a storyteller’s job himself of grouping these pieces effectively. Highly recommended.” —<i>Library Journal</i> (starred review)</p> <p>“Like no other book I have read in years, this one restored my belief in Americans and the American experience.” —Philip Levine, <i>Ploughshares</i></p> </article><article> <h4>From The Critics</h4>Two years ago, on National Public Radio's "Weekend All Things Considered," Auster introduced the National Story Project. In an attempt "to put together an archive of facts, a museum of American reality," he welcomed anyone to submit a story, following two rules: it must be true and it must be short. This book collects 179 stories-Auster calls them "reports from the frontlines of personal experience"-picked from over 4,000 entries. There is the unassuming yet beautiful portrait of a summer afternoon in a 1960s Manhattan neighborhood; the story of a man given leave after fifteen years in prison to attend his grandmother's funeral; and a homeless woman's account of her living situation. There are impossible coincidences, eerie omens and visions, and tales of love and war and family and death. <br> —Ted Waitt <br> <br> </article> <article> <h4>Publishers Weekly</h4>This is a moving collection of stories that realizes the audio format's best possibilities. Culled from a collaboration between novelist Auster (Leviathan) and National Public Radio's All Things Considered, these slices of the American experience are real-life tales from people all over the country on a range of subjects. Since Auster himself selected the stories, it's no surprise that they echo his own approach while reading them: comfortable and emotive, with dexterous use of the power of understatement. Auster's tone is engaging, if a bit mellow, but what comes across more than anything is his genuine concern for the stories themselves and his belief in their merits. He keeps his dramatization to a minimum in order to let those merits shine through, and the recording is sure to leave listeners alternately smiling, nostalgic or melancholic. Even if a particular piece doesn't strike a chord, listeners won't be disappointed for long, as one of the production's finer points is its variety. Each tale lasts only a few minutes, but many of the images linger much longer. And because the stories were originally intended for radio, this is one instance where the audio is preferred over the print version. Based on the Holt hardcover (Forecasts, June 4, 2001). (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information. </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>In 2001, when NPR asked Auster to become a regular storyteller on Weekend All Things Considered, he wasn't interested. Then his wife suggested that he ask people to send him their stories to read on the air, and a few months later the National Story Project with was born. From some 4000 stories, Auster has selected 179, grouping them in loose categories: animals, objects, families, slapstick, strangers, war, love, death, dreams, and meditations. All are short, all are true, and they can be sad, hilarious, or both at the same time. In the title piece, Robert Winnie's father tells someone to drop dead and he does! In another, a grandson who has made his grandmother furious hears his grandfather tell him, "You are my revenge." Others tell of impossible coincidences, difficult lives, and wonderful comebacks. As this collection ably proves, we all shape experience into stories, and Auster has done a storyteller's job himself of grouping the pieces effectively. Highly recommended for public libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/1/01.] Mary Paumier Jones, Westminster P.L., Westminster, CO Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information. </article> <article> <h4>School Library Journal</h4>Adult/High School-Auster was on the verge of saying no to an offer to tell his own stories on the air when a chance remark by his wife changed the complexion and ultimately the direction of a National Public Radio project. She suggested that listeners be invited to make submissions. With that, the remarkable National Story Project was born. The rules were relatively simple; the stories had to be true and they had to be short. Four thousand people sent in their work. After just a few months, it became evident to Auster that too many good stories were coming in and that a book would be necessary to do justice to the project. He chose what he considered to be the best-179 pieces, written by individuals ranging in age from 20 to 90, from all walks of life, and touching on everything from the amazing to the poignant. Readers will turn pages to see if the next story is just as memorable as the one before, and it is. This is a wonderful book about some incredible people, to enjoy and to share with others.-Peggy Bercher, Fairfax County Public Library, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information. </article> <article> <h4>Kirkus Reviews</h4>A collection of vignettes from the American stew pot, written for broadcast on National Public Radio by men and women from every racial, cultural, and economic stratum. Auster, who proposed the National Story Project in 1999 and has been reading the results on NPR ever since, has received more than 4,000 submissions since the project began. He culled 179 of them for this volume, few more than two or three pages long, some as brief as half a page. Placing no limits on subject matter, Auster asked his listeners only for anecdotes that "revealed the mysterious and unknowable forces at work in our lives." What he got were tales ranging from spectral apparitions in the bedroom to painful custody trials, with a preponderant emphasis on childhood memories. The collection he shaped from this material encompasses the comic and the tragic, the absurd and the surreal, the mundane and the ethereal. The title story, for instance, recounts a bizarre incident from the writer's youth, when his father in a burst of justifiable irritation told a cranky neighbor to "drop dead"-and the neighbor did. "The Chicken," which opens the collection, is a provocative six-sentence tale about a bird's adventure on the streets of Portland, Oregon. The volume is divided somewhat arbitrarily into 10 chapters, beginning with "Animals" and concluding with "Meditations"; "War," "Death," "Love," and "Slapstick" fall in between. The prose can be awkward, pretentious, or occasionally elegant, but for the most part it's simple and direct. "A Shot in the Light," for instance, relates the story of a man who was shot four times by a stranded motorist he had befriended. Victim and shooter survive, and the piece shows forgivenesson both sides, but the author makes no attempt to relate the incident to larger religious or political themes. Bedside fodder for general readers and a bonanza for fiction writers looking for core stories to launch a novel. Author tour </article> <article> <h4>Sunday Oklahoman</h4>“A wonderful story collection...and something that would make a great gift for the holidays.” </article>
77Listening For God Rdr Vol 4Paula J. Carlson0Paula J. Carlson (Editor), Peter S. Hawkinslistening-for-god-rdr-vol-4paula-j-carlson97808066457730806645776$13.43PaperbackAugsburg Fortress, PublishersJanuary 2003New EditionFaith, Literature Anthologies - General & Miscellaneous, General & Miscellaneous Christian Life, American Literature Anthologies1645.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.35 (d)This resource helps adults explore the issues of discipleship and theology through guided interaction from selections of American literature. Listening for God includes excerpts from the works of eight contemporary American authors supplemented by author profiles, and discussion and reflection questions. <p>Included are selections from:</p> <p>James Baldwin Sue Miller Robert Olen Butler Doris Betts Michael Malone Allegra Goodman Alice Elliott Dark Kent Haruf</p><p>Where do you listen for God? In this new collection of stories and essays, the challenge is to pay attention everywhere. <I>Listening for God</i> is a resource intended to help readers investigate how life and faith merge in surprising ways and places. Contemporary American literature may not be the most predictable place to listen for God, but it may well turn out to be among the most rewarding.</p><table> <tr><td>Introduction</td></tr> <tr><td>1. John Cheever</td></tr> <tr><td>The Five-Forty-Eight</td></tr> <tr><td>2. Mary Gordon</td></tr> <tr><td>Mrs. Cassidy's Last Year</td></tr> <tr><td>3. Wendell Berry</td></tr> <tr><td>Pray without Ceasing</td></tr> <tr><td>4. Oscar Hijuelos</td></tr> <tr><td>Christmas 1967</td></tr> <tr><td>5. Reynolds Price</td></tr> <tr><td>Long Night</td></tr> <tr><td>6. Louis Erdrich</td></tr> <tr><td>Satan: Hijacker of a Planet</td></tr> <tr><td>7. Tess Gallagher</td></tr> <tr><td>The Woman Who Prayed</td></tr> <tr><td>8. Tillie Olsen</td></tr> <tr><td>O Yes</td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> </table>
78The American Tradition in Literature (concise) book aloneGeorge Perkins0<p><P>George Perkins is Professor of English at Eastern Michigan University and an Associate Editor of<P>Narrative. He holds degrees from Tufts and Duke universities and received his Ph.D. from Cornell.<P>He has been a Fulbright Lecturer at the University of Newcastle in Australia and has held a Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh. In addition to Newcastle and Edinburgh, he has taught at Washington University, Baldwin-Wallace College and Fairleigh Dickinson University. His books include THE THEORY OF THE AMERICAN NOVEL, REALISTIC AMERICAN SHORT FICTION, AMERICAN POETIC THEORY, THE HARPER HANDBOOK TO LITERATURE (with Northrup Frye and Sheridan Baker), THE PRACTICAL<P>IMAGINATION (with Frye, Baker and Barbara Perkins), BENET'S READER'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (with Barbara Perkins), KALEIDOSCOPE&#58; Stories of the American<P>Experience (with Barbara Perkins), WOMEN'S WORK; An Anthology of American Literature (with<P>Barbara Perkins and Robyn Warhol), and THE AMERICAN TRADITION IN LITERATURE, 9TH edition <P>(with Barbara Perkins).<P>Barbara Perkins is Adjunct Professor of English at the University of Toledo and Associate Editor of Narrative. Since its founding, she has served as Secretary-Treasurer of the Society for the Study of Narrative Literature. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and has taught at Baldwin-Wallace College, The University of Pennsylvania, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Eastern Michigan University, and the University of Newcastle, Australia. She has contributed essays to several reference works including CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS, GREAT WRITERS OF THE ENLGISH LANGUAGE, and THE WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA. Her books include CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE (with George Perkins), BENET'S READER'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF<P>AMERICAN LITERATURE (with George Perkins and Phillip Leininger), KALEIDOSCIPE&#58; Stories<P>Of the American Experience (with George Perkins), WOMEN'S WORK&#58; An Anthology of American Literature (with George Perkins and Robyn Warhol) and THE AMERICAN TRADITION IN LITERATURE, 9th edition (with George Perkins).</p>George Perkins, Barbara Perkinsthe-american-tradition-in-literaturegeorge-perkins97800733848940073384895$106.79PaperbackMcGraw-Hill Companies, TheNovember 200812nd EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies23526.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 2.10 (d)<p>Widely known as the anthology that best unites tradition with innovation, The American Tradition in Literature is proud to enter its fifth decade of leadership among textbook anthologies of American literature.</p> <p>Each volume continues to offer a flexible organization, with literary merit as the guiding principle of selection. The new photos and illustrations illuminate the texts and literary/historical timelines help students put works in context.</p><p><P>Widely known as the anthology that best unites tradition with innovation, The American Tradition in Literature is proud to enter its fifth decade of leadership among textbook anthologies of American literature.<P>Each volume continues to offer a flexible organization, with literary merit as the guiding principle of selection. The new photos and illustrations illuminate the texts and literary/historical timelines help students put works in context.</p><P>List of Illustrations</p>Preface<br></p>EXPLORATION AND THE COLONIES, 1492&#8211;1791</p>Virginia and the South</p>New England</p>Timeline: Exploration and the Colonies<br><br></p>NATIVES AND EXPLORERS</p>NATIVE LITERATURE: THE ORAL TRADITION</p>The Chiefs Daughters</p>Coyote and Bear</p>Twelfth Song of the Thunder</p>The Corn Grows Up</p>At the Time of the White Dawn</p>Snake the Cause</p>The Weaver&#8217;s Lamentation</p>CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1451-1506)</p>[Report of the First Voyage]</p>GIOVANNI DA VERRAZZANO (1485?-1528)</p>From Verrazzano&#8217;s Voyage: 1524</p>ALVAR NUEZ CABEZA DE VACA (c1490-c1557)</p>From Narrative of Cabeza de Vaca</p>Chapter 12: The Indians Bring Us Food </p>Chapter 16: The Christians Leave the Island of Malhado </p>RICHARD HAKLUYT (1552-1616)</p>The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake</p>[Nova Albion]</p>SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN (c1567-1635)</p>From Voyages of Samuel de Champlain: The Voyage of 1604&#8211;1607<br></p>THE COLONIES</p>JOHN SMITH (1580-1631) </p>From The General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles </p>The Third Book. The Proceedings and Accidents of the English Colony in Virginia</p>Chapter II: What Happened till the First Supply </p>The Fourth Book: The Proceedings of the English after the Alteration of the Government Of Virginia </p>John Smith's Relation to Queen Anne of Pocahontas (1616)</p>WILLIAM BRADFORD (1590-1657) </p>From Of Plymouth Plantation, Book I </p>Chapter IX: Of their Voyage, and how they Passed the Sea; and of their Safe Arrival at Cape Cod</p>Chapter X: Showing How they Sought out a place of Habitation; and What Befell them Thereabout </p>From Of Plymouth Plantation, Book II </p>[The Mayflower Compact (1620)] </p>[Compact with the Indians]</p>[First Thanksgiving]</p>[Narragansett Challenge]</p>[Thomas Morton of Merrymount</p>JOHN WINTHROP (1588-1649)</p>From A Model of Christian Charity <br></p>PURITANISM</p>ANNE BRADSTREET (1612?-1672) </p>The Prologue</p>The Flesh and the Spirit </p>The Author to Her Book</p>Before the Birth of One of Her Children </p>To My Dear and Loving Husband</p>A Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment </p>In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet, Who Deceased August, 1665 Being a Year and a Half Old </p>Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666 </p>MARY ROWLANDSON (1636?&#8211;1711?)</p>From A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson</p>EDWARD TAYLOR (1642?-1729) </p>The Preface </p>Upon Wedlock, and Death of Children </p>Huswifery </p>Meditation 8, First Series</p>Upon a Spider Catching a Fly <br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: PURITANS, INDIANS, AND WITCHCRAFT</p>COTTON MATHER (1663-1728)</p>*[Indian Powaws and Witchcraft]</p>*MARY TOWNE EASTY (1634?-1692)</p>[The Petition of Mary Towne Easty]</p>SAMUEL SEWALL (1652-1730)</p>*[A Witchcraft Judge&#8217;s Confession of Guilt]<br></p>COTTON MATHER (1663-1728)</p>From The Wonders of the Invisible World </p>Enchantments Encountered </p>The Trial of Bridget Bishop </p>A Third Curiosity<br></p>THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE COLONIES </p>WILLIAM BYRD (1674-1744) </p>FromThe History of the Dividing Line </p>[Indian Neighbors]</p>JOHN WOOLMAN (1720-1772) </p>From The Journal of John Woolman </p>1720-1742 [Early Years]</p>1757 [Evidence of Divine Truth], [Slavery]</p>1755-1758 [Taxes and Wars] </p>ST. JEAN DE CREV&#200;COEUR (1735-1813) </p>From Letters from an American Farmer: </p>What Is an American? <br></p>REASON AND REVOLUTION </p>The Enlightenment and the Spirit of Rationalism </p>From Neoclassical to Romantic Literature </p>Timeline: Reason and Revolution</p>JONATHAN EDWARDS (1703-1758)</p>Sarah Pierrepont </p>From A Divine and Supernatural Light</p>Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God </p>Personal Narrative </p>BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (1706-1790) </p>From The Autobiography </p>From Poor Richard's Almanack</p>Preface to Poor Richard, 1733 </p>The Way to Wealth: Preface to Poor Richard, 1758 </p>*The Speech of Polly Baker</p>THOMAS PAINE (1737-1809)</p>From Common Sense</p>Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs</p>The American Crisis </p>THOMAS JEFFERSON (1737-1809) </p>The Declaration of Independence </p>First Inaugural Address</p>FromNotes on the State of Virginia </p>[A Southerner on Slavery]</p>[Speech of Logan]</p>Letter to John Adams </p>[The True Aristocracy]</p>OLAUDAH EQUIANO (1745?-1797?)</p>From The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano</p>Chapter II: [Horrors of a Slave Ship] </p>Chapter III: [Travels to Various Countries]</p>Chapter VII: [He Purchases his Freedom]</p>PHILLIS WHEATLEY (1754?-1784) </p>To the University of Cambridge, in New-England</p>On Being Brought from Africa to America</p>On the Death of the Reverend Mr. George Whitefield</p>An Hymn to the Evening</p>To S.M. a Young African Painter, on Seeing His Works </p>To His Excellency General Washington </p>PHILIP FRENEAU (1752-1832) </p>To the Memory of the Brave Americans </p>The Wild Honey Suckle</p>The Indian Burying Ground </p>On the Universality and Other Attributes of the God of Nature<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: NATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN A NEW WORLD</p>FRANCIS HIGGINSON (1586-1630) </p>From New England&#8217;s Plantation</p>WILLIAM BARTRAM (1739-1832) </p>From Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida</p>[Indian Corn, Green Meadows, and Strawberry Fields]</p>JOHN JAMES AUDUBON (1785-1893) </p>From The Ornithological Biography</p>Kentucky Sports</p>FRANCIS PARKMAN (1823-1893) </p>From The Oregon Trail</p>Chapter VII: The Buffalo<br></p>THE ROMANTIC TEMPER, 1800-1870 </p>Regional Influences</p>Nature and the Land</p>The Original Native Americans</p>Timeline: The Romantic Temper </p>WASHINGTON IRVING (1783-1859) </p>From The Sketch Book</p>Rip Van Winkle </p>The Legend of Sleepy Hollow </p>JAMES FENIMORE COOPER (1789-1851) </p>From The Pioneers</p>Chapter XXII [Pigeons] </p>From The Prairie</p>Chapter XXXIX [Death of a Hero] </p>WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT (1794-1878)</p>Thanatopsis</p>The Yellow Violet </p>To a Waterfowl</p>A Forest Hymn </p>To the Fringed Gentian </p>The Prairies</p>The Death of Lincoln </p>RED JACKET (c. 1752&#8211;1830)</p>[The Great Spirit Has Made Us All]<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: ROMANTICISM AND THE AMERICAN INDIAN</p>JANE JOHNSTON SCHOOLCRAFT [BAMEWAWAGEZHIKAQUAY] (1800-1842) </p>Invocation: To My Maternal Grandfather on Hearing of His Descent from Chippewa Ancestors Misrepresented<br></p>ROMANTICISM AT MID-CENTURY </p>EDGAR ALLAN POE (1809-1849) </p>Romance</p>Sonnet--To Science </p>Lenore</p>The Sleeper</p>Israfel</p>To Helen </p>The City in the Sea </p>Sonnet--Silence</p>The Raven </p>Ulalume</p>Annabel Lee </p>Ligeia</p>The Fall of the House of Usher </p>The Purloined Letter</p>The Cask of Amontillado </p>NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE (1804-1864) </p>My Kinsman, Major Molineux</p>Young Goodman Brown</p>The Minister's Black Veil </p>The Birthmark</p>Rappaccini's Daughter </p>Ethan Brand </p>HERMAN MELVILLE (1819-1891) </p>Bartleby the Scrivener</p>The Portent</p>The Maldive Shark </p>Billy Budd, Sailor <br></p>TRANSCENDENTALISM </p>RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803-1882) </p>Nature</p>The American Scholar </p>The Divinity School Address</p>Self-Reliance</p>The Over-Soul</p>Concord Hymn </p>Each and All </p>The Rhodora </p>Hamatreya</p>Fable</p>Brahma </p>Days</p>MARGARET FULLER (1810-1850)</p>From Woman in the Nineteenth Century<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: TRANSCENDENTALISM, WOMEN, AND SOCIAL IDEALS</p>ELIZABETH PEABODY (1804&#8211;1894)</p>[Labor, Wages, and Leisure]</p>CHARLES DICKENS (1812&#8211;1870)</p>From American Notes</p>[The Mill Girls of Lowell]</p>ELIZABETH CADY STANTON (1815&#8211;1902)</p>Declaration of Sentiments [Seneca Falls, 1848]</p>SOJOURNER TRUTH (c. 1797&#8211;1883)</p>[Ar&#8217;n&#8217;t I a Woman?]</p>FANNY FERN (1811&#8211;1872)</p>Aunt Hetty on Matrimony</p>The Working-Girls of New York<br></p>HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817-1862) </p>From Walden</p>Economy </p>Where I Lived, and What I Lived for </p>Brute Neighbors</p>Conclusion</p>Civil Disobedience <br></p>THE HUMANITARIAN SENSIBILITY AND THE INEVITABLE CONFLICT, 1800-1870 </p>Democracy and Social Reform </p>Inevitable Conflict </p>Timeline: The Humanitarian Sensibility and the Inevitable Conflict<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: SLAVERY, THE SLAVE TRADE, AND THE CIVIL WAR </p>BRITON HAMMON (fl. 1760)</p>From Narrative of the Uncommon Sufferings, and Surprizing Deliverance of Briton Hammon, a Negro Man </p>WILLIAM CUSHING (1732&#8211;1810)</p>[Slavery Inconsistent with Our Conduct and Constitution]</p>ALEXANDER FALCONBRIDGE (1760-1792)</p>From An Account of the Slave Trade, on the Coast of Africa</p>HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807&#8211;1882)</p>The Witnesses</p>LYDIA MARIA CHILD (1802&#8211;1880)</p>[Reply to Margaretta Mason]</p>SARAH MORGAN (1842&#8211;1909)</p>From The Civil War Diary of Sarah Morgan</p>SARAH MORGAN BRYAN PIATT (1836-1919)</p>Army of Occupation<br></p>HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807-1882) </p>The Arsenal at Springfield </p>From The Song of Hiawatha</p>III. Hiawatha's Childhood</p>IV. Hiawatha and Mudjekeewis </p>V. Hiawatha's Fasting</p>VII. Hiawatha's Sailing</p>XXI. The White Man's Foot</p>The Jewish Cemetery at Newport </p>My Lost Youth</p>Divina Commedia</p>The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls </p>The Cross of Snow</p>JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (1807-1892)</p>Massachusetts to Virginia</p>First-Day Thoughts </p>Telling the Bees </p>Laus Deo</p>OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES (1809-1894) </p>Old Ironsides </p>The Last Leaf </p>My Aunt</p>The Chambered Nautilus</p>ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865) </p>Reply to Horace Greeley </p>Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery</p>Second Inaugural Address</p>HARRIET BEECHER STOWE (1811-1896) </p>From Uncle Tom's Cabin</p>Chapter VII: The Mother's Struggle</p>HARRIET JACOBS (1813-1897)</p>FromIncidents in the Life of a Slave Girl </p>Chapter VI: The Jealous Mistress</p>Chapter XVII: The Flight</p>Chapter XVIII: Months of Peril </p>Chapter XIX: The Children Sold</p>FREDERICK DOUGLASS (1817?-1895)</p>From Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass</p>Chapter I [Birth] </p>Chapter VII [Learning to Read and Write]. </p>Chapter X [Mr. Covey] <br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: FAITH AND CRISIS </p>HERMAN MELVILLE (1819-1981)</p>From Moby-Dick, or The Whale</p>SARAH MORGAN BRYAN PIATT (1836-1919)</p>No Help</p>Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)</p>338 [I know that He exists]</p>376 [Of course&#8212;I prayed--]<br></p>AN AGE OF EXPANSION, 1865-1910 </p>From Romanticism to Realism </p>Regionalism</p>The Gilded Age </p>Timeline: An Age of Expansion</p>PIONEERS OF A NEW POETRY </p>WALT WHITMAN (1819-1892)</p>Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass </p>Song of Myself</p>Once I Pass'd Through a Populous City </p>Facing West from California's Shores </p>For You O Democracy</p>I Saw in Louisiana a Live-oak Growing </p>Crossing Brooklyn Ferry</p>Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking </p>The Dalliance of the Eagles</p>Cavalry Crossing a Ford</p>Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night </p>A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim </p>The Wound-Dresser</p>Reconciliation </p>When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd </p>There Was a Child Went Forth</p>To a Common Prostitute</p>The Sleepers </p>A Noiseless Patient Spider </p>To a Locomotive in Winter</p>Good-bye My Fancy! </p>EMILY DICKINSON (1830-1886)</p>49 [I never lost as much but twice]</p>67 [Success is counted sweetest]</p>130 [These are the days when Birds come back -- ] </p>214 [I taste a liquor never brewed -- ]</p>241 [I like a look of Agony]</p>249 [Wild Nights -- Wild Nights!] </p>252 [I can wade Grief -- ]</p>258 [There's a certain Slant of light] </p>280 [I felt a Funeral, in my Brain]</p>285 [The Robin's my Criterion for Tune -- ] </p>288 [I'm Nobody! Who are you?]</p>290 [Of Bronze -- and Blaze -- ] </p>303 [The Soul selects her own Society -- ] </p>320 [We play at Paste -- ]</p>324 [Some keep the Sabbath going to Church] </p>328 [A Bird came down the Walk -- ]</p>341 [After great pain, a formal feeling comes -- ]</p>401 [What Soft -- Cherubic Creatures -- ] </p>435 [Much Madness is divinest Sense -- ] </p>441 [This is my letter to the World]</p>448 [This was a Poet -- It is That] </p>449 [I died for Beauty -- but was scarce] </p>465 [I heard a Fly buzz -- when I died -- ] </p>511 [If you were coming in the Fall] </p>556 [The Brain, within its Groove] </p>579 [I had been hungry, all the Years -- ] </p>581 [I found the works to every thought]</p>585 [I like to see it lap the Miles -- ] </p>632 [The Brain -- is wider than the sky -- ] </p>636 [The Way I read a Letter's -- this -- ] </p>640 [I cannot live with You -- ]</p>650 [Pain -- Has a Element of Blank -- ] </p>657 [I dwell in Possibility -- ]</p>701 [A Thought went up my mind today--]</p>712 [Because I could not stop for Death -- ]</p>732 [She rose to His Requirement -- dropt] </p>754 [My Life had stood -- a Loaded Gun -- ] </p>816 [A Death blow is a Life blow to Some] </p>823 [Not what We did, shall be the test] </p>986 [A narrow Fellow in the Grass]</p>1052 [I never saw a Moor -- ]</p>1078 [The Bustle in a House] </p>1082 [Revolution is the Pod]</p>1100 [The last Night that She lived] </p>1129 [Tell all the Truth but tell it slant -- ]</p>1207 [He preached upon Breadth till it argued him narrow -- ]</p>1263 [There is no Frigate like a Book] </p>1304 [Not with a Club, the Heart is broken] </p>1463 [A Route of Evanescence]</p>1540 [As imperceptibly as Grief]</p>1587 [He ate and drank the precious Words -- ] </p>1624 [Apparently with no surprise]</p>1732 [My life closed twice before its close -- ]</p>1760 [Elysium is as far as to] </p>Letters</p>[To Recipient Unknown, about 1858]</p>[To Recipient Unknown, about 1861]</p>[To Recipient Unknown, early 1862?]</p>[To T. W. Higginson, 15 April 1862]</p>[To T. W. Higginson, 25 April 1862]</p>[To T. W. Higginson, 7 June 1862]</p>[To T. W. Higginson, July 1862]</p>[To T. W. Higginson, August 1862]<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: FREEDOM IN THE GILDED AGE</p>WALT WHITMAN (1819&#8211;1892)</p>From Democratic Vistas</p>HENRY ADAMS (1838&#8211;1918)</p>From The Education of Henry Adams</p>Chapter XVII: President Grant</p>GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE (1844&#8211;1925)</p>From The Freedman&#8217;s Case in Equity</p>[The Perpetual Alien]</p>BOOKER T. WASHINGTON (1856&#8211;1915)</p>From Up from Slavery</p>[The Struggle for an Education]<br></p>REALISM AND NATURALISM, 1880-1920 </p>Realism</p>Spiritual Unrest</p>Naturalism </p>Timeline: The Turn of the Century</p>MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)</p>The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County </p>From Roughing It</p>[When the Buffalo Climbed a Tree] </p>From Life on the Mississippi</p>The Boy's Ambition</p>[A Mississippi Cub-Pilot] </p>How to Tell a Story</p>WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837-1920) </p>Editha</p>HENRY JAMES (1843-1916)</p>Daisy Miller</p>The Real Thing </p>The Beast in the Jungle</p>BRET HARTE (1836-1902) </p>The Outcasts of Poker Flat </p>RED CLOUD (c. 1822-1909)</p>[All I Want Is Peace and Justice]</p>SARAH WINNEMUCCA HOPKINS (1844-1894) </p>From Life among the Piutes </p>Chapter 1: First Meeting of Piutes and Whites </p>HENRY ADAMS (1838-1918)</p>The Dynamo and the Virgin</p>SARAH ORNE JEWETT (1849-1909) </p>A White Heron</p>KATE CHOPIN (1851-1904) </p>The Awakening</p>MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN (1852-1930) </p>The Revolt of "Mother"</p>CHARLES W. CHESTNUTT (1858-1932) </p>The Passing of Grandison<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: PROSPERITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY</p>ANDREW CARNEGIE (1835&#8211;1919)</p>Wealth</p>STEPHEN CRANE (1871&#8211;1900)</p>The Trees in the Garden Rained Flowers</p>WILLIAM VAUGHAN MOODY (1869&#8211;1910)</p>Gloucester Moors</p>On a Soldier Fallen in the Philippines</p>ZITKALA-SA (1876&#8211;1938)</p>Retrospection</p>W. E. B. DUBOIS (1868&#8211;1963)</p>From The Souls of Black Folk</p>Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others<br></p>CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860-1935) </p>The Yellow Wallpaper</p>FRANK NORRIS (1870-1902)</p>A Plea for Romantic Fiction </p>STEPHEN CRANE (1871-1900)</p>Do Not Weep, Maiden, for War is Kind</p>The Wayfarer</p>A Man Said to the Universe </p>The Open Boat </p>EDITH WHARTON (1862-1937) </p>Roman Fever</p>THEODORE DREISER (1871-1945) </p>The Second Choice</p>JACK LONDON (1876-1916) </p>To Build a Fire <br></p>LITERARY RENAISSANCE, 1910-1930 </p>Twentieth-Century Renaissance </p>Poetry between the Wars </p>Timeline: Literary Renaissance</p>NEW DIRECTIONS: FIRST WAVE </p>EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON (1869-1935) </p>Luke Havergal</p>Richard Cory </p>Miniver Cheevy </p>Mr. Flood's Party </p>The Mill</p>Firelight </p>New England </p>WILLA CATHER (1873-1947) </p>Neighbour Rosicky</p>ROBERT FROST (1874-1963) </p>The Tuft of Flowers</p>Mending Wall</p>Home Burial </p>After Apple-Picking </p>The Wood-Pile </p>The Road Not Taken </p>The Oven Bird</p>Birches</p>The Hill Wife </p>The Ax-Helve</p>The Grindstone</p>The Witch of Co&#246;s </p>Fire and Ice</p>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening </p>Two Tramps in Mud Time</p>Desert Places</p>Design</p>Come In </p>Directive </p>CARL SANDBURG (1878-1967) </p>Chicago</p>Fog</p>Nocturne in a Deserted Brickyard </p>Monotone</p>Gone</p>A Fence </p>Grass</p>Southern Pacific </p>Washerwoman</p>SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876-1941) </p>The Book of the Grotesque</p>Adventure</p>SUSAN GLASPELL (1876?-1948)</p>*Trifles</p>EZRA POUND (1885-1972) </p>In a Station of the Metro </p>Hugh Selwyn Mauberley</p>From The Cantos </p>I: [And then went down to the ship] </p>XIII: [Kung walked]</p>LXXXI: [What thou lovest well remains] </p>CXVI: [Came Neptunus]</p>T. S. ELIOT (1888-1965)</p>The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock </p>Gerontion</p>The Waste Land </p>The Hollow Men</p>AMY LOWELL (1874-1925) </p>Patterns</p>A Decade </p>ELINOR WYLIE (1885-1928) </p>Wild Peaches</p>Sanctuary</p>Prophecy </p>Let No Charitable Hope </p>O Virtuous Light</p>H.D. (HILDA DOOLITTLE) (1886-1961) </p>Heat</p>Heliodora </p>Lethe</p>Sigil <br></p>POETS OF IDEA AND ORDER </p>WALLACE STEVENS (1879-1955) </p>Peter Quince at the Clavier</p>Disillusionment of Ten O'Clock </p>Sunday Morning</p>Anecdote of the Jar </p>The Snow Man</p>Bantams in Pine-Woods </p>A High-Toned Old Christian Woman </p>The Emperor of Ice-Cream</p>To the One of Fictive Music </p>The Idea of Order at Key West </p>A Postcard from the Volcano</p>Of Modern Poetry </p>No Possum, No Sop, No Taters </p>The Plain Sense of Things</p>Of Mere Being</p>WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS (1883-1963) </p>The Young Housewife</p>Tract </p>To Mark Anthony in Heaven </p>Portrait of a Lady</p>Queen-Anne's-Lace </p>The Great Figure </p>Spring and All</p>The Red Wheelbarrow </p>This Is Just to Say </p>A Sort of a Song </p>The Dance</p>The Ivy Crown</p>MARIANNE MOORE (1887-1972) </p>Poetry</p>In the Days of Prismatic Color </p>An Egyptian Pulled Glass Bottle in the Shape of a Fish</p>No Swan So Fine</p>A Jelly-Fish</p>HART CRANE (1899-1932) </p>From The Bridge</p>To Brooklyn Bridge </p>Van Winkle</p>The River </p>The Tunnel <br></p>A LITERATURE OF SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CHANGE, 1920-1945 </p>Drama and Social Change </p>Primitivism </p>The Roaring Twenties and the Lost Generation </p>The Harlem Renaissance</p>Depression and Totalitarian Menace </p>Timeline: A Literature of Social and Cultural Change</p>EUGENE O'NEILL (1888-1953) </p>The Hairy Ape</p>ROBINSON JEFFERS (1887-1962) </p>To the Stone-Cutters</p>Shine, Perishing Republic </p>The Purse-Seine</p>CLAUDE MCKAY (1889-1948) </p>The Harlem Dancer</p>Harlem Shadows</p>America</p>Outcast </p>EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY (1892-1950) </p>First Fig </p>[I Shall Go Back Again to the Bleak Shore]</p>[What Lips My Lips Have Kissed, and Where, and Why ]</p>Justice Denied in Massachusetts</p>[This Beast That Rends Me in the Sight of All ]</p>[Love Is Not All: It Is Not Meat Nor Drink] </p>[Those Hours When Happy Hours Were My Estate] </p>[I Will Put Chaos into Fourteen Lines]</p>E. E. CUMMINGS (1894-1962)</p>Thy Fingers Make Early Flowers Of </p>When God Lets My Body Be</p>In Just-</p>Buffalo Bill's </p>My Sweet Old Etcetera </p>I Sing of Olaf Glad and Big </p>Somewhere I Have Never Travelled, Gladly Beyond </p>Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town</p>My Father Moved through Dooms of Love </p>Up into the Silence the Green</p>Plato Told</p>When Serpents Bargain for the Right to Squirm</p>I Thank You God<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: THE JAZZ AGE AND THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE</p>JAMES WELDON JOHNSON (1871&#8211;1938)</p>[Negro Dialect]</p>PAUL ROBESON</p>Reflections on O&#8217;Neill&#8217;s Plays</p>LANGSTON HUGHES</p>When the Negro Was in Vogue</p>ST JAMES INFIRMARY BLUES<br></p>LANGSTON HUGHES (1902-1967)</p>The Negro Speaks of Rivers</p>The Weary Blues</p>Song for a Dark Girl </p>Trumpet Player </p>Dream Boogie</p>Harlem</p>F. SCOTT FITZGERALD (1896-1940) </p>Babylon Revisited</p>JOHN DOS PASSOS (1896-1970) </p>FromThe 42nd Parallel</p>Big Bill</p>From 1919</p>The House of Morgan </p>The Body of An American </p>From The Big Money</p>Newsreel LXVI</p>The Camera Eye (50)</p>Vag</p>WILLIAM FAULKNER (1897-1962) </p>That Evening Sun</p>Barn Burning</p>ERNEST HEMINGWAY (1899-1961) </p>Big Two-Hearted River: Part I</p>Big Two-Hearted River: Part II</p>KATHERINE ANNE PORTER (1890-1980) </p>The Jilting of Granny Weatherall</p>RICHARD WRIGHT (1908-1960)</p>From Black Boy</p>[A Five Dollar Fight] <br></p>THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH </p>Postwar Drama </p>Postwar Poetry </p>Postwar Fiction </p>Multiculturalism</p>The Postmodern Impulse</p>Timeline: The Second World War and Its Aftermath</p>DRAMA </p>TENNESSEE WILLIAMS (1911-1983) </p>The Glass Menagerie<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: THE AGE OF ANXIETY: THE BEAT GENERATION AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES</p>JACK KEROUAC</p>From On the Road</p>JOHN CLELLON HOLMES (1926&#8211;1988)</p>From The Philosophy of the Beat Generation</p>DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (1890&#8211;1969)</p>[The Military Industrial Complex]</p>RACHEL CARSON (1904&#8211;1964)</p>From Silent Spring</p>MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR (1929&#8211;1968)</p>I Have a Dream<br></p>POETRY </p>THEODORE ROETHKE (1908-1963) </p>Open House</p>Cuttings (later) </p>My Papa's Waltz </p>Elegy for Jane </p>The Waking</p>I Knew a Woman</p>The Far Field </p>Wish for a Young Wife</p>In a Dark Time</p>ELIZABETH BISHOP (1911-1979) </p>The Fish</p>At the Fishhouses </p>Questions of Travel </p>Sestina</p>In the Waiting Room </p>One Art</p>CZESLAW MILOSZ (1911-2004) </p>Campo dei Fiori </p>Fear </p>Caf&#233; </p>In Warsaw </p>Ars Poetica? </p>To Raja Rao </p>With Her</p>ROBERT HAYDEN (1913&#8211;1980)</p>Tour 5</p>Those Winter Sundays</p>Year of the Child</p>JOHN BERRYMAN (1914-1972) </p>1: [Huffy Henry hid the day]</p>4: [Filling her compact & delicious body]</p>14: [Life, friends, is boring. We must not say so]</p>29: [There sat down, once, a thing on Henry's heart]</p>76: [Henry's Confession]</p>145: [Also I love him: me he's done no wrong] </p>153: [I'm cross with god who has wrecked this generation]</p>384: [The marker slants, flowerless, day's almost done]</p>GWENDOLYN BROOKS (1917-2000)</p>a song in the front yard</p>The Bean Eaters</p>We Real Cool</p>The Lovers of the Poor </p>ROBERT LOWELL (1917-1977)</p>Waking in the Blue</p>Skunk Hour</p>The Neo-Classical Urn </p>For the Union Dead</p>Reading Myself </p>Epilogue</p>DENISE LEVERTOV (1923- ) </p>The Third Dimension </p>To the Snake </p>The Willows of Massachusetts </p>ROBERT BLY (1926- )</p>Driving toward the Lac Qui Parle River </p>Driving to Town Late to Mail a Letter </p>Watering the Horse</p>The Executive's Death</p>Looking at New-Fallen Snow from a Train</p>ALLEN GINSBERG (1926-1997) </p>Howl</p>America</p>SYLVIA PLATH (1932-1963)</p>Morning Song </p>The Applicant </p>Daddy </p>Lady Lazarus </p>Death & Co </p>Mystic </p>AMIRI BARAKA (1934- )</p>In Memory of Radio </p>An Agony. As Now.<br></p>PROSE </p>EUDORA WELTY (1909- ) </p>A Memory</p>VLADIMIR NABOKOV (1899-1977)</p>From Pnin </p>Chapter Five [Pnin at the Pines] </p>ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER (1904-1991)</p>Gimpel the Fool</p>JOHN CHEEVER (1912-1982) </p>The Swimmer</p>RALPH ELLISON (1914- ) </p>From Invisible Man </p>Chapter 1 [Battle Royal] </p>BERNARD MALAMUD (1914-1986) </p>The Mourners</p>SAUL BELLOW (1915- ) </p>A Silver Dish </p>JAMES BALDWIN (1924-1987) </p>Sonny's Blues</p>FLANNERY O'CONNOR (1925-1964) </p>Good Country People</p>JOHN BARTH (1930- ) </p>Lost in the Funhouse</p>JOHN UPDIKE (1932- ) </p>Separating</p>PHILIP ROTH (1933- ) </p>The Conversion of the Jews </p>THOMAS PYNCHON (1937- )</p>Entropy <br></p>A CENTURY ENDS AND A NEW MILLENNIUM BEGINS, 1975 to Present</p>Drama</p>Poetry</p>Fiction</p>Multiculturalism</p>Timeline: A Century Ends and a New Millennium Begins<br></p>CROSSCURRENTS: WHAT IS AN AMERICAN? FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY</p>BOB DYLAN</p>Masters of War</p>NORMAN MAILER (1923-2007)</p>From Armies of the Night</p>BETTY FRIEDAN</p>The Problem that Has No Name</p>TIM O&#8217;BRIEN (1946- )</p>The Things They Didn&#8217;t Know</p>AL GORE (1948- )</p>From An Inconvenient Truth<br></p>POETRY</p>JAMES WRIGHT </p>A Note Left in Jimmy Leonard's Shack </p>Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio </p>In Terror of Hospital Bills </p>Two Postures Beside a Fire </p>JAMES MERRILL (1926-1995)</p>A Timepiece </p>Charles on Fire </p>The Broken Home </p>JOHN ASHBERY (1927- )</p>Some Trees </p>The Painter </p>Crazy Weather </p>At North Farm </p>Down by the Station, Early in the Morning </p>ANNE SEXTON </p>Her Kind</p>The Farmer's Wife </p>The Truth the Dead Know </p>With Mercy for the Greedy </p>ADRIENNE RICH</p>Aunt Jennifer's Tigers </p>Living in Sin</p>Diving into the Wreck </p>For the Dead</p>GARY SNYDER </p>The Late Snow & Lumber Strike of the Summer of Fifty-four</p>Riprap </p>Not Leaving the House </p>Axe Handles</p>MARY OLIVER </p>In Blackwater Woods </p>The Ponds </p>Picking Blueberries, Austerlitz, New York, 1957. </p>Early Morning, New Hampshire </p>JOSEPH BRODSKY (1940-1996)</p>From Lullaby of Cape Cod </p>IV [The change of Empires is intimately tied] </p>Belfast Tune </p>A Song </p>To My Daughter</p>SIMON ORTIZ</p>Vision Shadows</p>Poems from the Veterans Hospital</p>From From Sand Creek</p>RITA DOVE</p>&#214;</p>Dusting </p>Roast Possum </p>CATHY SONG </p>Picture Bride </p>Immaculate Lives<br></p>PROSE </p>JOYCE CAROL OATES (1938- )</p>Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? </p>TONI MORRISON</p>From Sula</p>1992 </p>RAYMOND CARVER</p>A Small, Good Thing</p>BOBBIE ANN MASON</p>Shiloh</p>BHARATI MUKHERJEE (1940- )</p>The Management of Grief</p>ALICE WALKER </p>Everyday Use</p>TIM O'BRIEN </p>From Going After Cacciato</p>Night March </p>ANN BEATTIE</p>Janus </p>AMY TAN </p>Half and Half </p>LOUISE ERDRICH </p>The Red Convertible </p>SANDRA CISNEROS</p>Woman Hollering Creek</p>SHERMAN ALEXIE</p>What You Pawn I Will Redeem</p>JHUMPA LAHIRI </p>The Third and Final Continent</p>EDWIDGE DANTICAT</p>Seven<br><br> </p>Historical-Literary Timeline</p>Bibliography</p>Acknowledgments </p>Index
79Approaching Literature: Writing, Reading, ThinkingPeter Schakel0<p><p><b>PETER SCHAKEL</b> is Peter C. and Emajean Cook Professor of English at Hope College. He is author of <i>The Poetry of Jonathan Swift</i> (1978) and four books on C.S. Lewis, including<i> Imagination and the Arts in C.S. Lewis</i> (2002) and <i>The Way into Narnia&#58; A Reader's Guide</i> (2005). He is also editor of<i> Critical Approaches to Teaching Swift </i>(1992) and <i>The Longing for a Form&#58; Essays and Fiction on C.S. Lewis </i>(1977); coeditor with Charles A. Huttar of <i>Word and Story in C.S. Lewis</i> (1991) and<i> The Rhetoric of Vision&#58; Essays on Charles Williams</i> (1996). For Bedford/St. Martin's, with Jack Ridl he co-edited <i>Approaching Poetry</i> (1997) and <i>250 Poems</i> (2003), and he is coeditor with Janet Gardner, Beverley Lawn, and Jack Ridl of <i>Literature&#58; a Portable Anthology</i> (2004).<p><b>JACK RIDL</b> is Professor Emeritus of English at Hope College where he taught courses in literature, essay writing, poetry writing, and the nature of poetry for thirty-five years. He has published six volumes of poetry and more than 200 poems in some fifty literary magazines; his most recent collection, <i>Broken Symmetry</i>, was selected by the Society of Midland Authors as one of the two best volumes of poetry published in 2006. His chapbook <i>Against Elegies</i> received the 2001 Letterpress Award from the Center for Book Arts. His recognitions for teaching excellence include the Hope Outstanding Professor-Educator award at Hope College for 1976, the Michigan Teacher of the Year award from the Carnegie Foundation in 1996, and the Favorite Faculty/Staff Member award at Hope College in 2003. For Bedford/St. Martin's, with Peter Schakel he co-edited <i>Approaching Poetry</i> (1997) and<i> 250 Poems</i> (2003); and he is coeditor with Janet Gardner, Beverley Lawn, and Peter Schakel of <i>Literature&#58; a Portable Anthology</i> (2004).<b></b><p></p>Peter Schakel, Jack Ridlapproaching-literaturepeter-schakel97803124528340312452837$48.94PaperbackBedford/St. Martin'sDecember 20072nd EditionNonfiction Writing - General & Miscellaneous, English Language Readers, Student Life - College Guides, Rhetoric - English Language, American Literature Anthologies16966.53 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 1.69 (d)<p>Developed by authors with more than 50 years of teaching experience between them, <i>Approaching Literature</i> has been designed as a true alternative to more traditional literature anthologies. The authors conceived this anthology with three principles in mind: (1) that exposing students to the widest array of literature can help every one find common ground with that literature; (2) that contemporary literary works can serve as entry points to reading and appreciating the canonical literature that students often find unfamiliar, intimidating, and sometimes irrelevant; and (3) that the instruction in reading and writing about literature should be accessible and jargon-free to all students, not just potential English majors. With its streamlined and student-friendly instructional text, and its ongoing commitment to showcasing the most engaging and diverse literary works publishing right now, <i>Approaching Literature</i> is built from the ground up with today's students in mind.</p><p><p>Developed by authors with more than 50 years of teaching experience between them, <i>Approaching Literature</i> has been designed as a true alternative to more traditional literature anthologies. The authors conceived this anthology with three principles in mind&#58; (1) that exposing students to the widest array of literature can help every one find common ground with that literature; (2) that contemporary literary works can serve as entry points to reading and appreciating the canonical literature that students often find unfamiliar, intimidating, and sometimes irrelevant; and (3) that the instruction in reading and writing about literature should be accessible and jargon-free to all students, not just potential English majors. With its streamlined and student-friendly instructional text, and its ongoing commitment to showcasing the most engaging and diverse literary works publishing right now, <i>Approaching Literature</i> is built from the ground up with today's students in mind. <p></p><p>PART I. APPROACHING LITERATURE<p><B>1. Reading Literature&#58; <I>Taking Part in a Process<BR></B><BR></I><B>Sherman Alexie,</B><I> Superman and Me<p></I>The Nature of Reading<p>Active Reading<p>CHECKLIST on Active Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>Julia Alvarez, </B><I>Daughter of Invention<p></I><B>2. Writing in Response to Literature&#58; <I>Entering the Conversation<BR></B><BR></I><B>Alice Walker,</B><I> The Flowers<p></I>Writing in the Margins<p>Journal Writing<p>Discussing Literature<BR><B><BR>TIPS for Effective Journal Writing<p>TIPS for Participating in Class Discussions<p></B>Writing Essay Examination Answers<p>Writing Short Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS for Writing a Short Paper<p></B>Writing Research Papers<p>Writing Papers in Other Formats<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>PART II. APPROACHING FICTION<p><B>3. Reading Fiction&#58; <I>Responding to the Real World of Stories<p></B></I>What Is Fiction?<p>Why Read Fiction?<p>Active Reading&#58; Fiction<p>Rereading Fiction<p><B>4. Plot and Characters&#58; <I>Watching What Happens, to Whom<p></B></I>Reading for Plot<BR><I><BR></I><B>Dagoberto Gilb,</B><I> Love in L.A.<p></I>Reading for Characters<p>CHECKLIST for Reading About Plot and Character<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>Louise Erdrich,</B><I> The Red Convertible <BR></I><B><BR>Joyce Carol Oates,</B><I> Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<p>Writing About Plot and Character<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing About Plot and Character<p>Writing About Connnections<p></B>"Love and the City"&#58; Realizing Relationships in Dagoberto Gilb&#8217;s <I>Love in L.A.</I> and Raymond Carver&#8217;s <I>What We Talk about When We Talk about Love<p></I>"My Brother&#8217;s Keeper"&#58; Supportive Siblings in Louise Erdrich&#8217;s <I>The Red Convertible </I>and James Baldwin&#8217;s<I> Sonny&#8217;s Blues<p></I>"Good Men Are Hard to Find"&#58; Encounters with Evil in Joyce Carol Oates&#8217;s <I>Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?</I> and Flannery O&#8217;Connor&#8217;s <I>A Good Man Is Hard to Find</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>5. Point of View and Theme&#58; <I>Being Alert to Angles, Open to Insights<BR></I><BR>Sandra Cisneros,</B><I> The House on Mango Street<p></I>Reading for Narrator<p>Reading for Point of View<p>Theme<p>CHECKLIST for Reading about Point of View and Theme<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>Alice Walker,</B><I> Everyday Use<p></I>*<B>George Saunders,</B><I> The End of FIRPO in the World<p></I>Approaching Graphic Fiction<BR><I><BR></I>*<B>Lynda Barry,</B><I> Today&#8217;s Demon&#58; Magic<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<p>Writing About Point of View and Theme<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<p><B>TIPS on Writing about Point of View and Theme<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Staring Out Front Windows"&#58; Seeking Escape in Sandra Cisneros&#8217;s<I> The House on Mango Street</I> and James Joyce&#8217;s <I>Araby</I> <p>"Can You Come Home Again?"&#58; The Difficulty of Returning in Alice Walker&#8217;s <I>Everyday Use</I> and Monica Ali&#8217;s <I>Dinner with Dr. Azad</I> <p>"States of Mind That Matter"&#58; Approaching Death in George Saunders&#8217;s <I>The End of FIRPO in the World</I> and Katherine Anne Porter&#8217;s <I>The Jilting of Granny Weatherall</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>6. Setting and Symbol&#58; <I>Meeting Meaning in Places and Objects<p></B></I>Setting<BR><I><BR></I><B>Ernest Hemingway,</B><I> Hills Like White Elephants<p></I>Reading for Symbols<p>Reading for Allegory<p>CHECKLIST for Reading about Setting and Symbol<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>Tim O&#8217;Brien,</B><I> The Things They Carried<p></I>*<B>Edward P. Jones,</B><I> Bad Neighbors<p></I>*<B>Joe Sacco,</B><I> Complacency Kills <p></I><B>Writing About Symbol and Setting<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<p><B>TIPS on Writing about Setting and Symbol<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Secrets of the Heart"&#58; Keeping Hope Alive in Ernest Hemingway&#8217;s <I>Hills Like White Elephants</I> and David Means&#8217;s <I>The Secret Goldfish</I> <p>"Dying a Good Death"&#58; Struggles Over What Matters in Tim O&#8217;Brien&#8217;s<I> The Things They Carried</I> and Yiyun Li&#8217;s <I>Persimmons</I> <p>"&#8216;A Good Man Is Hard to Find&#8217;"&#58; Nature vs. Nurture in Edward P. Jones&#8217;s <I>Bad Neighbors</I> and Nathaniel Hawthorne&#8217;s <I>Young Goodman Brown</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>7. Style, Tone, and Irony&#58; <I>Attending to Expression and Attitude <BR></B><BR></I><B>Kate Chopin,</B><I> The Story of an Hour<p></I>Reading for Style<p>Reading for Tone<p>Reading for Irony<p>CHECKLIST on Reading about Style, Tone, and Irony<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>Toni Cade Bambara,</B><I> The Lesson<p></I>*<B>Katherine Min,</B><I> Courting a Monk<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<p>Writing About Style, Tone and Irony<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Style, Tone, and Irony<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Time for a Change"&#58; Kate Chopin&#8217;s <I>The Story of an Hour</I> and Jhumpa Lahiri&#8217;s <I>A Temporary Matter</I> <p>"Learning Out of School"&#58; Personal Maturity in Toni Cade Bambara&#8217;s <I>The Lesson</I> and John Updike&#8217;s <I>A & P</I> <p>"&#8216;Gather Ye Rosebuds&#8217;"&#58; Looking for Love in Katherine Min&#8217;s <I>Courting a Monk</I> and William Faulkner&#8217;s <I>A Rose for Emily</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>8. Writing about Fiction&#58; <I>Applying What You&#8217;ve Learned<p></B></I>Topics<BR><B><BR>TIPS for Writing Compare and Contrast Papers<p></B>Development<p><B>TIPS for Writing Social and Cultural Criticism<p></B>A Student Writer at Work&#58; Alicia Abood on the Writing Process<p><B>Student Paper&#58; </B>Alicia Abood, "Clips of Language&#58; The Effect of Diction in Dagoberto Gilb&#8217;s &#8216;Love in L.A.&#8217;"<p><B>9. An Author in Depth&#58; <I>Sherman Alexie&#58; Exploring One Writer&#8217;s World<BR></B><BR></I><B>Sherman Alexie,</B><I> This is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona<p></I><B>Sherman Alexie,</B><I> The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven<p></I>*<B>Sherman Alexie,</B><I> Somebody Kept Saying Powwow<p></I><B>Tomson Highway,</B><I> Interview with Sherman Alexie<p></I>*<B>Ase Nygren,</B><I> A World of Story-Smoke&#58; A Conversation with Sherman Alexie<BR></I><B><BR>Joseph L. Coulombe,</B><I> The Approximate Size of His Favorite Humor&#58; Sherman Alexie&#8217;s Comic Connections and Disconnections in </I>The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven<BR><I><BR></I>*<B>Jerome Denuccio,</B><I> Slow Dancing with Skeletons&#58; Sherman Alexie&#8217;s </I>The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven<BR><I><BR></I>*<B>James Cox,</B><I> Muting White Noise&#58; The Subversion of Popular Culture Narratives of Conquest in Sherman Alexie&#8217;s Fiction<p></I><B>10. A Collection of Stories&#58; <I>Visiting a Variety of Vistas<BR></B><BR></I>*<B>Monica Ali,</B><I> Dinner with Dr. Azad<BR></I><B><BR>Isabel Allende</B><I> </I>(Chile)<I>, And of Clay Are We Created<BR></I><B><BR>James Baldwin,</B><I> Sonny&#8217;s Blues<p></I>*<B>Melissa Bank, </B><I>The Wonder Spot<p></I>*<B>Raymond Carver,</B><I> What We Talk about When We Talk about Love<p></I>*<B>Judith Ortiz Cofer,</B><I> American History<p></I><B>Ralph Ellison,</B><I> Battle Royal<p></I><B>William Faulkner,</B><I> A Rose for Emily<BR></I><B><BR>Nathaniel Hawthorne,</B><I> Young Goodman Brown<BR></I><B><BR>Zora Neale Hurston,</B><I> Sweat<p></I>*<B>James Joyce,</B><I> Araby<p></I><B>Jamaica Kincaid,</B><I> Girl<p></I>*<B>Jhumpa Lahiri,</B><I> A Temporary Matter<p></I>*<B>Yiyun Li,</B><I> Persimmons <p></I><B>Gabriel Garc&#8217;a Marquez </B>(Columbia)<I>, A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings<p></I>*<B>David Means,</B><I> The Secret Goldfish<p></I>*<B>Ana Menendez, </B><I>Her Mother&#8217;s House<p></I><B>Toni Morrison,</B><I> Recitatif<p></I>*<B>Haruki Murakami,</B><I> Birthday Girl<p></I><B>Flannery O&#8217;Connor,</B><I> A Good Man Is Hard to Find<p></I><B>Tillie Olsen,</B><I> I Stand Here Ironing<p></I><B>Edgar Allen Poe,</B><I> The Cask of Amontillado<p></I><B>Katherine Anne Porter,</B><I> The Jilting of Granny Weatherall<p></I><B>Nahid Rachlin, </B><I>Departures<p></I><B>Salman Rushdie </B>(India)<I>, The Prophet&#8217;s Hair<BR></I><B><BR>Leslie Marmon Silko,</B><I> The Man to Send Rain Clouds<p></I>*<B>Zadie Smith,</B><I> The Girl with Bangs<p></I>*<B>John Steinbeck,</B><I> The Chrysanthemums<p></I><B>Amy Tan,</B><I> Two Kinds<BR></I><B><BR>John Updike,</B><I> A & P<p></I><B>Helena Mar&#8217;a Viramontes,</B><I> The Moths<p></I>PART III. APPROACHING POETRY<p><B>11. Reading Poetry&#58; <I>Realizing the Richness in Poems<p></B></I>What Is Poetry?<p>Why Read Poetry?<p>Active Reading&#58; Poetry<p>Rereading Poetry<p><B>12. Words and Images&#58; <I>Seizing on Sense and Sight<p></B></I>Denotation<BR><I><BR></I><B>Robert Hayden,</B><I> Those Winter Sundays<p></I>Connotation<BR><I><BR></I><B>Gwendolyn Brooks,</B><I> The Bean Eaters<p></I>Images<BR><I><BR></I><B>Maxine Kumin,</B><I> The Sound of Night<p></I><B>William Carlos Williams,</B><I> The Red Wheelbarrow<p></I>CHECKLIST on Reading for Words and Images<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>Allison Joseph,</B><I> On Being Told I Don&#8217;t Speak like a Black Person<p></I>*<B>Robert Bly,</B><I> Driving to Town Late to Mail a Letter<BR></I><B><BR>Jonathan Swift,</B><I> A Description of the Morning<p></I><B>Garrett Kaoru Hongo,</B><I> Yellow Light<p></I><B>Robert Frost,</B><I> After Apple-Picking<p></I><B>Anita Endrezze,</B><I> The Girl Who Loved the Sky<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Words and Images<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Autumn Leaves"&#58; The Changing Seasons of Life in Robert Frost&#8217;s <I>After Apple-Picking</I> and Joseph Awad&#8217;s <I>Autumnal</I> <p>"Seeing the City"&#58; The Contrasting Perspectives of Jonathan Swift&#8217;s <I>A Description of the Morning</I> and Cheryl Savageau&#8217;s <I>Bones &#8212; A City Poem <p></I>"Impermanence&#8217;s Permanence"&#58; Anita Endrezze&#8217;s <I>The Girl Who Loved the Sky</I> and Edmund Spenser&#8217;s<I> One day I wrote her name upon the strand</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>13. Voice, Tone, and Sound&#58; <I>Hearing for How Sense Is Said<p></B></I>Voice<BR><I><BR></I><B>Li-young Lee,</B><I> Eating Alone<p></I><B>Charles Bukowski,</B><I> my old man<p></I>Dramatic Monologue<p>Tone<BR><I><BR></I><B>Theodore Roethke, </B><I>My Papa&#8217;s Waltz<p></I>Irony<BR><I><BR></I><B>Marge Piercy,</B><I> Barbie Doll<p></I>Sound<BR><I><BR></I><B>Sekou Sundiata,</B><I> Blink Your Eyes<p></I>CHECKLIST on Reading for Voice, Tone, and Sound<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>Wilfred Owen,</B><I> Dulce et Decorum Est<p></I><B>Yosef Komunyakaa,</B><I> Facing It<p></I><B>Richard Garcia</B><I>, Why I Left the Church<p></I>*<B>Billy Collins,</B><I> Consolation<p></I><B>Robert Browning,</B><I> My Last Duchess<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<p><B>TIPS on Writing about Voice, Tone, and Sound<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"All the Comforts of Home"&#58; Contrasting Spirits of Adventure in Billy Collins&#8217;s <I>Consolation</I> and Alfred, Lord Tennyson&#8217;s <I>Ulysses</I> <p>"Arms and the Man"&#58; War without Glory in Wilfred Owen&#8217;s <I>Dulce et Decorum Est </I>and Vievee Francis&#8217;s <I>Private Smith&#8217;s Primer</I> <p>"Dancing with the Dark"&#58; Movement and Memory in Theodore Roethke&#8217;s <I>My Papa&#8217;s Waltz</I> and Cornelius Eady&#8217;s <I>My Mother, If She Had Won Free Dance Lessons <p></I><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>14. Form and Type&#58; <I>Delighting in Design<p></B></I>Lines<BR><I><BR></I><B>Gwendolyn Brooks,</B><I> We Real Cool<p></I>Stanzas<BR><I><BR></I><B>Countee Cullen, </B><I>Incident<p></I>Sonnets<BR><I><BR></I><B>William Shakespeare, </B><I>That time of year thou mayst in me behold<BR></I><B><BR>Claude McKay, </B><I>If we must die<BR></I><B><BR>Gerard Manley Hopkins,</B><I> God&#8217;s Grandeur<p></I><B>Helene Johnson,</B><I> Sonnet to a Negro in Harlem<p></I>Blank Verse and Couplets<p>Free Verse<BR><B><BR>Leslie Marmon Silko, </B><I>Prayer to the Pacific<p></I>Internal Form<p>CHECKLIST on Reading for Form and Type<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>James Wright,</B><I> A Blessing<BR></I><B><BR>Joy Harjo,</B><I> She Had Some Horses<p></I><B>William Butler Yeats,</B><I> The Lake Isle of Innisfree<p></I>*<B>Robert Herrick,</B><I> To Daffodils<p></I><B>David Mura,</B><I> Grandfather-in-law<p></I>*<B>Elizabeth Bishop,</B><I> Sestina<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Form and Type<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Amazing Grace"&#58; Being Blessed from within and from without in James Wright&#8217;s <I>A Blessing</I> and Galway Kinnell&#8217;s <I>Saint Francis and the Sow</I> <p>"&#8216;Which thou must leave ere long&#8217;"&#58; Approaching Separation in Elizabeth Bishop&#8217;s <I>Sestina</I> and William Shakespeare&#8217;s <I>That time of year thou mayst in me behold</I> <p>"The Solace of Solitude"&#58; Place and Peace in W. B.Yeats&#8217;s<I> The Lake Isle of Innisfree</I> and Lorine Niedecker&#8217;s <I>My Life by Water</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>15. Figurative Language&#58; <I>Wondering What This Has to Do with That<p></B></I>Simile<BR><B><BR>Julie Moulds,</B><I> </I>From<I> Wedding Iva<BR></I><B><BR>Langston Hughes,</B><I> Harlem<p></I>Metaphor<BR><B><BR>Dennis Brutus,</B><I> Nightsong&#58; City<p></I>Personification<BR><I><BR></I><B>Angelina Weld Grimke,</B><I> A Winter Twilight<p></I>Metonymy And Synecdoche<BR><B><BR>Edwin Arlington Robinson</B><I>, Richard Cory<p></I>Two Other Observations about Figures<BR><I><BR></I><B>William Stafford,</B><I> Traveling through the Dark<p></I>CHECKLIST on Reading for Figurative Language<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>John Keats,</B><I> To Autumn<p></I>*<B>Mary Oliver,</B><I> First Snow<BR></I><B><BR>Judith Ortiz Cofer,</B><I> Cold as Heaven<BR></I><B><BR>Geoffrey Hill,</B><I> In Memory Of Jane Fraser<BR></I><B><BR>Julia Alvarez,</B><I> How I Learned to Sweep<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Figurative Language<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Innocence and Experience"&#58; Confrontations with Evil in Julia Alvarez&#8217;s <I>How I Learned to Sweep</I> and William Blake&#8217;s<I> The Chimney Sweeper <p></I>"A Joyful Melancholy"&#58; Nature and Beauty in Mary Oliver&#8217;s <I>First Snow</I> and William Wordsworth&#8217;s <I>I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud <p></I>"Knowing Deep the Seasons"&#58; Antitheses of Life in John Keats&#8217;s <I>To Autumn</I> and William Carlos Williams&#8217;s <I>Spring and All</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>16. Rhythm and Meter&#58; <I>Feeling the Beat, the Flux, and the Flow<p></B></I>Rhythm<BR><I><BR></I><B>e. e. cummings,</B><I> Buffalo Bill&#8217;s <p></I>Meter<BR><I><BR></I><B>Paul Laurence Dunbar,</B><I> We Wear the Mask<p></I>CHECKLIST on Reading for Rhythm and Meter<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>Lucille Clifton,</B><I> at the cemetery, walnut grove plantation, south carolina, 1989<p></I><B>Lorna Dee Cervantes,</B><I> Freeway 280<BR></I><B><BR>Robert Frost,</B><I> The Road Not Taken<p></I><B>Naomi Shihab Nye,</B><I> The Small Vases From Hebron<BR></I><B><BR>A. K. Ramanujan,</B><I> Self-portrait<BR></I><B><BR>Emily Dickinson,</B><I> I&#8217;m Nobody! Who are you?<BR></I><B><BR>Sylvia Plath,</B><I> Metaphors<BR></I><B><BR>Georgia Douglas Johnson,</B><I> Wishes<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Rhythm and Meter<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Grief beyond Grief"&#58; Dealing with Death in Ben Jonson&#8217;s<I> On My First Son</I> and Michael S. Harper&#8217;s <I>Nightmare Begins Responsibility</I> <p>"Remembering the Unremembered"&#58; The Language of Preservation in Lucille Clifton&#8217;s <I>at the cemetery, walnut grove plantation, south carolina, 1989</I> and Thomas Gray&#8217;s <I>Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard</I> <p>"On the Road Again"&#58; The Search for Self in Lorna Dee Cervante&#8217;s <I>Freeway 280</I> and Alfred, Lord Tennyson&#8217;s <I>Ulysses<p></I><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>17. Writing about Poetry&#58; <I>Applying What You&#8217;ve Learned<p></B></I>Topics<p>Development<p>A Student Writer at Work&#58; Dan Carter on the Writing Process<p><B>Student Paper&#58;</B> Dan Carter, &#210;A Slant on the Standard Love Sonnet&#211;<p><B>18. A Theme in Depth&#58; <I>Explicating the Everyday<p></B></I>*<B>Julia Alvarez,</B><I> Ironing Their Clothes<p></I>*<B>Laure-Anne Bosselaar,</B><I> Bench in Aix-en-Provence<p></I>*<B>Lucille Clifton,</B><I> Cutting Greens<p></I>*<B>Billy Collins,</B><I> Days<p></I>*<B>Emily Dickinson,</B><I> I heard a Fly buzz<p></I><B>Rita Dove,</B><I> The Satisfaction Coal Company<p></I><B>Robert Frost,</B><I> Mending Wall<p></I>*<B>Christopher Gilbert,</B><I> Touching<p></I>*<B>Ben Jonson,</B><I> Inviting a Friend to Supper<p></I>*<B>Ted Kooser,</B><I> Applesauce<p></I>*<B>Li-Young Lee,</B><I> Braiding<p></I>*<B>Denise Levertov,</B><I> The Acolyte<p></I>*<B>Pablo Neruda </B>(Chile),<I> Ode to French Fires<p></I><B>Naomi Shihab Nye,</B><I> The Small Vases from Hebron<p></I><B>Simon Ortiz,</B><I> Speaking<p></I>*<B>Jack Ridl,</B><I> Love Poem<p></I>*<B>Len Roberts,</B><I> At the Train Tracks<p></I>*<B>William Stafford,</B><I> Notice What This Poem Is Not Doing<p></I>*<B>Mary Tallmountain, </B><I>Peeling Pippins<p></I>*<B>Nancy Willard,</B><I> The Potato Picker<p></I>*<B>William Carlos Williams,</B><I> The Is Just to Say</I><p>*<B>William Wordsworth,</B><I> I wandered lonely as a cloud<p></I>*<B>Jeff Gundy,</B><I> A Review of </I>Delights and Shadows<I> by Ted Kooser<p></I>*<B>Sarah Jensen,</B><I> A Review of </I>Broken Symmetry<I> by Jack Ridl<p></I>*<B>William Stafford,</B><I> The Importance of the Trivial<p></I>*<B>Louis Simpson,</B><I> </I>from<I> Important and Unimportant Poems<p></I>*<B>Bill Moyers,</B><I> An Interview with Naomi Shihab Nye<p></I>*<B>Ted Kooser,</B><I> Out of the Ordinary<p></I>*<B>Paul Lake,</B><I> The Malady of the Quotidian<p></I>*<B>Donna A. Rohrer,</B><I> William Carlos Williams&#8217;s Poetics&#58; Turning the Ordinary into the Beautiful<p></I><B>19. A Collection of Poems&#58; <I>Valuing a Variety of Voices<BR></B><BR></I><B>Ai,</B><I> Why Can&#8217;t I Leave You?<p></I><B>Agha Shahid Ali,</B><I> I Dream It Is Afternoon When I Return To Delhi<p></I><B>Anonymous,</B><I> Sir Patrick Spens<p></I>*<B>Margaret Atwood,</B><I> True Stories<BR></I><B><BR>W. H. Auden,</B><I> Mus&#381;e Des Beaux Arts<p></I><B>Joseph Awad,</B><I> Autumnal<BR></I><B><BR>Jimmy Santiago Baca,</B><I> Family Ties<p></I><B>Jim Barnes,</B><I> Return To La Plata, Missouri<p></I><B>Gerald Barrax,</B><I> Dara<p></I><B>Elizabeth Bishop, </B><I>In the Waiting Room<p></I><B>William Blake, </B><I>The Chimney Sweeper<BR></I><B><BR>Peter Blue Cloud,</B><I> Rattle<p></I><B>Eavan Boland,</B><I> The Pomegranate<BR></I><B><BR>Anne Bradstreet,</B><I> To My Dear and Loving Husband<p></I><B>Sterling Brown,</B><I> Riverbank Blues<BR></I><B><BR>Elizabeth Barrett Browning,</B><I> How do I love thee? Let me count the ways<p></I>*<B>Anthony Butts, </B><I>Ferris Wheel<p></I>*<B>Ana Castillo,</B><I> I Heard the Cries of Two Hundred Children<p></I><B>Sandra Castillo, </B><I>Exile<p></I><B>Rosemary Catacalos, </B><I>David Talam&#8225;ntez on the Last Day of Second Grade<p></I>*<B>Tina Chang,</B><I> Origin & Ash<p></I><B>Marilyn Chin,</B><I> Turtle Soup<p></I><B>Samuel Taylor Coleridge,</B><I> Kubla Khan<BR></I><B><BR>Jayne Cortez,</B><I> Into This Time<p></I><B>Victor Hernandez Cruz,</B><I> Problems with Hurricanes<p></I><B>e. e. cummings, </B><I>in Just &#8212; <p></I><B>Keki N. Daruwalla,</B><I> Pestilence<p></I><B>Toi Derricotte,</B><I> A Note on My Son&#8217;s Face<p></I><B>Emily Dickinson,</B><I> Because I could not stop for death<p></I><B>Emily Dickinson,</B><I> Much Madness is divinest Sense<p></I><B>Ana Doina,</B><I> The Extinct Homeland &#8212; A Conversation with Czeslaw Milosz<p></I>*<B>John Donne,</B><I> Death, be not proud<p></I><B>Mark Doty,</B><I> Tiara<BR></I><B><BR>Cornelius Eady,</B><I> My Mother, If She Had Won Free Dance Lessons<p></I><B>T. S. Eliot,</B><I> The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock<p></I><B>Louise Erdrich,</B><I> A Love Medicine<p></I><B>Mart&#8217;n Espada,</B><I> The Saint Vincent de Paul Food Pantry Stomp<BR></I><B><BR>Sandra Mar&#8217;a Esteves,</B><I> A la Mujer Borrinque&#8211;a<p></I><B>Carolyn Forche,</B><I> The Colonel<p></I>*<B>Vievee Francis,</B><I> Private Smith&#8217;s Primer<p></I><B>Allen Ginsburg,</B><I> A Supermarket in California<p></I><B>Nikki Giovanni,</B><I> Nikka-Rosa<p></I><B>Ray Gonzalez,</B><I> Praise the Tortilla, Praise the Menudo, Praise the Chorizo<p></I><B>Thomas Gray,</B><I> Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard<p></I><B>Kimiko Hahn,</B><I> Mother&#8217;s Mother<p></I>*<B>Donald Hall,</B><I> The Names of Horses<BR></I><B><BR>Michael S. Harper, </B><I>Nightmare Begins Responsibility<BR></I><B><BR>Samuel Hazo,</B><I> For Fawzi in Jerusalem<p></I><B>Seamus Heaney,</B><I> Digging<p></I><B>George Herbert,</B><I> The Pulley<p></I><B>David Hernandez,</B><I> The Butterfly Effect<p></I><B>Robert Herrick,</B><I> To the Virgins to Make Much of Time<BR></I><B><BR>Linda Hogan,</B><I> The History Of Red<BR></I><B><BR>A. E. Housman, </B><I>To an Athlete Dying Young<p></I>*<B>Langston Hughes,</B><I> Theme for English B<BR></I><B><BR>Lawson Fusao Inada, </B><I>Plucking Out a Rhythm<p></I>*<B>Honoree Fanonne Jeffers,</B><I> Outlandish Blues (The Movie)<p></I><B>Ben Jonson,</B><I> On My First Son <p></I>*<B>A. Van Jordan,</B><I> From<p></I><B>John Keats,</B><I> Ode on a Grecian Urn<p></I>*<B>Jane Kenyon, </B><I>From Room to Room<BR></I><B><BR>Galway Kinnell, </B><I>Saint Francis and the Sow<p></I><B>Etheridge Knight, </B><I>Hard Rock Returns to Prison from the Hospital for the Criminal Insane<p></I>*<B>Stanley Kunitz, </B><I>Father and Son<p></I>*<B>Gerry La Femina,</B><I> The Sound a Body Makes<p></I><B>Li-young Lee,</B><I> Visions and Interpretations<p></I><B>Philip Levine, </B><I>What Work Is<p></I>*<B>Timothy Liu, </B><I>The Garden<p></I><B>Audre Lorde,</B><I> Hanging Fire<p></I><B>Richard Lovelace, </B><I>To Lucasta, Going to the Wars<p></I><B>Robert Lowell,</B><I> Skunk Hour<p></I>*<B>Medbh McGuckian,</B><I> On Ballycastle Beach<BR></I><B><BR>Heather McHugh,</B><I> What He Thought<BR></I><B><BR>Claude McKay,</B><I> America<BR></I><B><BR>Christopher Marlowe,</B><I> The Passionate Shepherd to His Love<p></I><B>Andrew Marvell,</B><I> To His Coy Mistress<p></I><B>Orlando Ricardo Menes, </B><I>Letter to Mirta Y&#8225;&#8211;ez<BR></I><B><BR>John Milton,</B><I> When I consider how my light is spent<p></I><B>Janice Mirikitani,</B><I> For a Daughter Who Leaves<BR></I><B><BR>Marianne Moore,</B><I> Poetry<p></I><B>Robert Morgan,</B><I> Mountain Bride<p></I>*<B>Thylias Moss,</B><I> The Lynching<p></I><B>Duane Niatum,</B><I> First Spring<p></I>*<B>Lorine Niedecker,</B><I> My Life by Water<BR></I><B><BR>Dwight Okita,</B><I> In Response to Executive Order 9066<p></I>*<B>William Olsen,</B><I> The Fold-Out Atlas of the Human Body&#58; A Three-Dimensional Book for Readers of All Ages<p></I><B>Michael Ondaatje,</B><I> Biography<p></I><B>Ricadro Pau-llosa,</B><I> Years of Exile<p></I><B>Gustavo Perez Firmat,</B><I> Jose Conseco Breaks Our Hearts Again<p></I>*<B>Lucy Perillo,</B><I> Air Guitar<p></I>*<B>Carl Phillips,</B><I> To the Tune of a Small, Repeatable, and Passing Kindness<p></I><B>Wang Ping,</B><I> Opening the Face<p></I><B>Robert Pinsky, </B><I>Shirt<p></I><B>Sylvia Plath, </B><I>Daddy<p></I><B>Sir Walter Raleigh,</B><I> The Nymph&#8217;s Reply to the Shepherd<p></I><B>Dudley Randall,</B><I> Ballad of Birmingham<p></I>*<B>Mary Ruefle,</B><I> Naked Ladies<p></I><B>Adrienne Rich,</B><I> Diving into the Wreck<BR></I><B><BR>Alberto R&#8217;os,</B><I> Nani<p></I><B>Wendy Rose,</B><I> Loo-wit<BR></I><B><BR>Sonia Sanchez, </B><I>An Anthem <p></I><B>Cheryl Savageau,</B><I> Bones &#8212; A City Poem<p></I><B>Vijay Seshadri,</B><I> The Refugee<p></I>*<B>William Shakespeare,</B><I> Shall I compare thee to a summer&#8217;s day?<p></I><B>Percy Bysshe Shelley, </B><I>Ozymandias<p></I>*<B>Charles Simic,</B><I> Classic Ballroom Dances<p></I><B>Cathy Song,</B><I> Girl Powdering Her Neck<p></I><B>Gary Soto, </B><I>The Elements of San Joaquin<p></I><B>Edmund Spenser, </B><I>One day I wrote her name upon the strand<p></I><B>Wallace Stevens,</B><I> The Emperor of Ice Cream<p></I>*<B>Mark Strand, </B><I>Eating Poetry<p></I>*<B>Virgil Su&#8225;rez, </B><I>Tea Leaves, Caracoles, Coffee Beans<p></I><B>Alfred, Lord Tennyson, </B><I>Ulysses<BR></I><B><BR>Dylan Thomas,</B><I> Do not go gentle into that good night<BR></I><B><BR>Jean Toomer, </B><I>Face<p></I><B>Quincy Troupe,</B><I> Poem for the Root Doctor of Rock &#8217;n&#8217; Roll<p></I><B>Gerald Vizenor,</B><I> Shaman Breaks<p></I><B>Derek Walcott,</B><I> Sea Grapes<BR></I><B><BR>James Welch,</B><I> Christmas Comes to Moccasin Flat<p></I>*<B>Patricia Jabbeh Wesley,</B><I> Becoming Ebony<p></I><B>Roberta Hill Whiteman,</B><I> The White Land<p></I><B>Walt Whitman, </B>From<I> Song of Myself<BR></I><B><BR>Richard Wilbur,</B><I> Love Calls Us to the Things of This World<p></I><B>William Carlos Williams, </B><I>Spring and All<p></I><B>Nellie Wong,</B><I> Grandmother&#8217;s Song<p></I>*<B>William Wordsworth, </B><I>I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud<BR></I><B><BR>Sir Thomas Wyatt,</B><I> They flee from me<p></I><B>John Yau,</B><I> Chinese Villanelle<p></I><B>William Butler Yeats,</B><I> The Second Coming<p></I><B>Al Young,</B><I> A Dance for Ma Rainy<p></I><B>Ray A. Young Bear, </B><I>Green Threatening Clouds<p></I>Reading Poems in Translation<p>Poems in Translation<BR><I><BR></I><B>Anna Akhmatova</B><I> </I>(Russia)<I>, Song of the Last Meeting<p></I><B>Yehuda Amichai </B>(Israel)<I>, Wildpeace<p></I><B>Reza Baraheni </B>(Iran)<I>, Autumn in Tehran <p></I><B>Jorge Luis Borges </B>(Argentina)<I>, The Other Tiger <BR></I><B><BR>Julia De Burgos </B>(Puerto Rico)<I>, Returning<p></I><B>Bei Dao </B>(China)<I>, Night&#58; Theme and Variations<p></I><B>Faiz Ahmed Faiz </B>(Pakistan)<I>, A Prison Daybreak <p></I><B>Nazim Hikmet </B>(Turkey)<I>, Letters from a Man in Solitary<p></I><B>Miroslav Holub</B><I> </I>(Czech Republic)<I>, Elementary School Field Trip to the Dinosaur Exhibit<p></I><B>Taslima Nasrin </B>(Bangladesh)<I>, Things Cheaply Had<p></I><B>Pablo Neruda</B><I> </I>(Chile)<I>, The Dead Woman<p></I><B>Octavio Paz </B>(Mexico)<I>, The Street<p></I><B>Dahlia Ravikovitch</B><I> </I>(Israel)<I>, Clockwork Doll<BR></I><B><BR>Masaoka Siki </B>(Japan)<I>, Haiku<p></I><B>Wislawa Szymborska </B>(Poland)<I>, On Death, without Exaggeration<p></I><B>Xu Gang</B><I> </I>(China)<I>, Red Azalea on the Cliff<p></I>PART IV. APPROACHING DRAMA<p><B>20. Reading Drama&#58; <I>Participating in a Playful Pretence<p></B></I>What Is Drama?<p>Why Read Drama?<p>Active Reading&#58; Drama <p>Rereading Drama<p><B>21. Character, Conflict, and Dramatic Action&#58; <I>Thinking about Who Does What to Whom and Why<BR></B><BR></I>*<B>Kelly Stuart,</B><I> The New New<p></I>Character<p>Dialogue<p>Conflict<p>Dramatic Action<p>CHECKLIST for Reading about Character, Conflict, and Dramatic Action<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I>*<B>Cusi Cram, </B><I>West of Stupid<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Character, Conflict, and Dramatic Action<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"Souls for Sale"&#58; The Cost of Devaluing Values in Kelly Stuart&#8217;s <I>The New New</I> and Arthur Miller&#8217;s <I>Death of a Salesman <p></I>"Death Draws Near"&#58; The Imminence of Mortality in Cusi Cram&#8217;s <I>West of Stupid</I> and David Henry Hwang&#8217;s <I>As the Crow Flies<p></I>"Spinning Out of Control"&#58; The Search for Meaning in John Guare&#8217;s <I>Woman at a Threshold, Beckoning </I>and William Shakespeare&#8217;s <I>Hamlet</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>22. Setting and Structure&#58; <I>Examining Where, When, and How It Happens<p></B></I>Setting<BR><B><BR>Susan Glaspell,</B><I> Trifles<p></I>Structure<p>CHECKLIST for Reading about Setting and Structure<p>Further Reading<BR><I><BR></I><B>David Ives,</B><I> Sure Thing<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Setting and Structure <p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"By a Higher Standard"&#58; The Conflict of Law and Justice in Susan Glaspell&#8217;s <I>Trifles</I> and Sophocles&#8217;s <I>Antigone</I> <p>"Living on a smile and a handshake"&#58; Seling Yourself in David Ive&#8217;s <I>Sure Thing</I> and Arthur Miller&#8217;s <I>Death of a Salesman<BR></I><BR>"Serving Time in Invisible Prisons"&#58; Social Entrapments in Henrik Ibsen&#8217;s <I>A Doll House</I> and August Wilson&#8217;s <I>Fences</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>23. Theaters and Their Influence&#58; <I>Imagining the Impact of Stage and Space<p></B></I>The Greek Theater <p>The Elizabethan Theater<p>The Modern Theater<p>The Contemporary Theater <p>CHECKLIST for Reading about Theaters and Their Influence<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>David Henry Hwang,</B><I> As the Crow Flies<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Theaters and Their Influence<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"I Gotta Be Me"&#58; Identity and Inter-relationships in John Leguizamo&#8217;s <I>Mambo Mouth&#58; A Savage Comedy</I> and David Ive&#8217;s <I>Sure Thing<p></I>"Dogs Eating Dogs"&#58; The Dramatic Depiction of Racial Oppression in John Leguizamo&#8217;s <I>Mambo Mouth&#58; A Savage Comedy</I> and Suzan-Lori Park&#8217;s <I>Topdog/Underdog<p></I>"Fathers and Sons"&#58; Familial Conflict in William Shakespeare&#8217;s <I>Hamlet</I> and August Wilson&#8217;s <I>Fences</I> <p><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>24. Dramatic Types and Their Effects&#58; <I>Getting into Genres<p></B></I>Tragedy<p>Comedy<p>Three Other Dramatic Types<p>CHECKLIST on Reading about Dramatic Types and Their Effects<p>Further Reading<BR><B><BR>John Leguizamo, </B>From<I> Mambo Mouth&#58; A Savage Comedy<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Journal Entries<p>Literary Analysis Papers<p>Comparison-Contrast Papers<BR><B><BR>TIPS on Writing about Dramatic Types and Their Effects<p>Writing About Connections<p></B>"The Haunted Heart"&#58; The Presence and Significance of Ghosts in David Henry Hwang&#8217;s <I>As the Crow Flies</I> and William Shakespeare&#8217;s <I>Hamlet<p></I>"A House Divided"&#58; Tyranny vs. Freedom in a Tragedy &#8212; Sophocle&#8217;s <I>Antigone</I> &#8212; and a Problem Play &#8212; Henrik Ibsen&#8217;s <I>A Doll House<BR></I><BR>"Everyone Loses"&#58; The Games People Play in Suzan-Lori Parks&#8217;s <I>Topdog/Underdog</I> and Arthur Miller&#8217;s <I>Death of a Salesman<p></I><B>Writing Research Papers<p>Composing in Other Art Forms<p>25. Writing about Drama&#58; <I>Applying What You&#8217;ve Learned<p></B></I>Topics<p>Development<p>A Student Writer at Work&#58; Julian Hinson on the Writing Process<p><B>Student Paper&#58;</B> Julian Hinson, &#210;When the New is Old in <I>The New New</I>&#211;<p><B>26. A Form in Depth&#58; <I>August Wilson&#8217;s </I>Fences<I>&#58; Wrestling with One Writer&#8217;s Work</I> <BR></B><BR><B>August Wilson,</B> <I>Fences<BR></I><BR>*Reviews and Photos of <I>Fences<BR></I><BR>*<B>Lloyd Richards,</B><I> </I>Fences&#58;<I> Introduction<BR></I><BR>*<B>Clive Barnes,</B><I> Fiery </I>Fences [a Review*<p>*<B>Frank Rich,</B><I> Family Ties in Wilson&#8217;s </I>Fences<p>*<B>Bonnie Lyons,</B><I> An Interview with August Wilson<BR></I><BR>*<B>Miles Marshall Lewis,</B><I> Miles Marshall Lewis Talks with August Wilson<BR></I><BR>*<B>Missy Dehn Kubitschek,</B><I> August Wilson&#8217;s Gender Lesson<BR></I><BR>*<B>Harry J. Elam, Jr.,</B><I> August Wilson<BR></I><BR>*<B>Suson Koprince,</B><I> Baseball as History and Myth in August Wilson&#8217;s </I>Fences<p><B>27. A Collection of Plays&#58; <I>Viewing</I> <I>from a Variety of Vantage Points<p></B></I>*<B>Sophocles,</B><I> Antigone<p></I>*<B>William Shakespeare,</B><I> Hamlet<p></I><B>Henrik Ibsen,</B><I> A Doll House<p></I><B>Arthur Miller, </B><I>Death of a Salesman<p></I>*<B>Suzan-Lori Parks,</B><I> Topdog/Underdog<p></I>*<B>John Guare,</B><I> Woman at a Threshold, Beckoning<p></I><B>Responding Through Writing<BR></B><BR>Papers Using No Outside Sources<p>Papers Using Limited Outside Sources<p>Papers Involving Further Research<p>PART V. APPROACHING LITERARY RESEARCH<p><B>28. Reading Critical Essays&#58; <I>Listening to the Larger Conversation<p></B></I>What Are Critical Essays?<p>Why Read Critical Essays?<p>Active Reading&#58; Critical Essays <p>Sample Essay<BR><I><BR></I><B>Susan Farrell,</B><I> "Fight vs. Flight&#58; A Re-evaluation of Dee in Alice Walker&#8217;s &#8216;Everyday Use&#8217;"<p></I>Rereading Critical Essays<p><B>29. Writing a Literary Research Paper&#58; <I>Incorporating the Larger Conversation<p></B></I>Topics<p>Types of Research and Sources<p>Conducting Research on Contemporary Literature<p>Finding Sources and Creating a Working Bibliography<p>Research on Contemporary Literature<p>Evaluating Sources<p>Taking Notes<p>Developing Your Paper and Thesis<p>Incorporating Sources<p>Avoiding Plagiarism<p>Documention Sources&#58; MLA Style<p>Preparing a Works Cited Page<p>A Student Writer at Work&#58; Kristina Martinez on the Research Process<p><B>Student Paper&#58;</B> Kristina Martinez, "The Structure of Story in Toni Morrison&#8217;s &#8216;Recitatif&#8217;"<p><B>Biographical Sketches<p>Appendix on Scansion<p>Approaching Critical Theory <p>Glossary of Literary Terms<p>Index of Authors and Titles <p></B> <p><p>* new to this edition<p>
80The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Volume C: 1865-1914Arnold Krupat0<p><b>Nina Baym</b> (General Editor), Ph.D. Harvard, is Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor Emerita of English, and Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is author of <b>The Shape of Hawthorne&rsquo;s Career</b>; <b>Woman's Fiction&#58; A Guide to Novels by and About Women in America</b>; <b>Novels, Readers, and Reviewers&#58; Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America</b>; <b>American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790-1860</b>; and <b>American Women of Letters and the Nineteenth-Century Sciences</b>. Some of her essays are collected in <b>Feminism and American Literary History</b>; she has also edited and introduced many reissues of work by earlier American women writers, from Judith Sargent Murray through Kate Chopin. In 2000 she received the MLA&rsquo;s Hubbell medal for lifetime achievement in American literary studies.<P><b>Arnold Krupat</b> (editor, Native American Literatures), Ph.D. Columbia, is Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College. He is the author, among other books, of <b>Ethnocriticism&#58; Ethnography, History, Literature</b>, <b>The Voice in the Margin&#58; Native American Literature and the Canon</b>, <b>Red Matters</b>, and most recently, <b>All That Remains&#58; Native Studies</b> (2007). He is the editor of a number of anthologies, including <b>Native American Autobiography&#58; An Anthology and New Voices in Native American Literary Criticism</b>. With Brian Swann, he edited <b>Here First&#58; Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers</b>, which won the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Award for best book of nonfiction prose in 2001.<P><b>Jeanne Campbell Reesman</b> (editor, 1865-1914), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, is Ashbel Smith Professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is author of <b>Houses of Pride&#58; Jack London&rsquo;s Race Lives</b>, <b>Jack London&#58; A Study of the Short Fiction</b>, and <b>American Designs&#58; The Late Novels of James and Faulkner</b>, and editor of <b>Speaking the Other Self&#58; American Women Writers</b>, and <b>Trickster Lives&#58; Culture and Myth in American Fiction</b>. With Wilfred Guerin et al. she is co-author of <b>A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature</b> and with Earle Labor of <b>Jack London&#58; Revised Edition</b>. With Kenneth Brandt she is co-editor of MLA Approaches to <b>Teaching Jack London</b>, with Leonard Cassuto <b>Rereading Jack London</b>, with Dale Walker <b>No Mentor but Myself&#58; Jack London on Writing and Writers</b>, and with Sara S. Hodson <b>Jack London&#58; One Hundred Years a Writer</b>. She and No&euml;l Mauberret are co-editors of a series of 25 new Jack London editions in French published by &Eacute;ditions Ph&eacute;bus of Paris. She is presently at work on two books&#58; <b>Mark Twain Versus God&#58; The Story of a Relationship</b>, and, with Sara S. Hodson, <b>The Photography of Jack London</b>. She is a member of the Executive Board of the American Literature Association and founder and Executive Coordinator of the Jack London Society.</p>Arnold Krupat (Editor), Jerome Klinkowitz (Editor), Mary Loeffelholz (Editor), Philip F. Gura (Editor), Bruce Michelsonthe-norton-anthology-of-american-literaturearnold-krupat97803939274120393927415$37.77PaperbackNorton, W. W. & Company, Inc.April 20077th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies10946.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.40 (d)<p><b>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field,</b> The Norton Anthology of American Literature has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p> <p>Under Nina Baym’s direction, the editors have considered afresh each selection and all the apparatus to make the anthology an even better teaching tool.</p><p>Firmly grounded in the core strengths that have made it the best-selling undergraduate survey in the field, <b>The Norton Anthology of American Literature</b> has been revitalized in this Seventh Edition through the collaboration between three new period editors and five seasoned ones.</p>
81American Fantastic Tales Boxed SetPeter Straub8<p><P>PETER STRAUB is the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of more than a dozen novels. Two of his most recent, <i>Lost Boy Lost Girl</i> and <i>In the Night Room,</i> are winners of the Bram Stoker Award. He lives in New York City.</p>Peter Straubamerican-fantastic-tales-boxed-setpeter-straub97815985305991598530593$49.42HardcoverLibrary of AmericaOctober 2009Fiction, American Literature Anthologies, Fiction Subjects15005.40 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 2.80 (d)From its beginning, American literature teems with tales of horror, hauntings, terrifying obsessions and gruesome incursions, of the uncanny ways in which ordinary reality can be breached and subverted by the unknown and the irrational. In the tales of Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne, and their literary successors, the bright prospects of the New World face an uneasy reckoning with the forces of darkness. As this pathbreaking two-volume anthology demonstrates, it is a tradition with many unexpected detours and hidden chambers, and one that continues to evolve, finding new forms and new themes. <p>Peter Straub, a contemporary master of literary horror and fantasy, offers an authoritative and diverse gathering of stories calculated to unsettle and delight, in styles ranging from the exquisitely insinuating speculations of Henry James's "The Jolly Corner" to the nightmarish post-apocalyptic savagery of Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream." Ghostly narratives of the Edwardian era, lurid classics from the pulp heyday of <i>Weird Tales</i>, latter-day masterpieces by Shirley Jackson, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, Joyce Carol Oates, and Steven Millhauser: over 80 stories in all, with a generous selection of contemporary authors who continue to push the genre in new and startling directions.</p><p>From its beginning, American literature teems with tales of horror, hauntings, terrifying obsessions and gruesome incursions, of the uncanny ways in which ordinary reality can be breached and subverted by the unknown and the irrational. In the tales of Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne, and their literary successors, the bright prospects of the New World face an uneasy reckoning with the forces of darkness. As this pathbreaking two-volume anthology demonstrates, it is a tradition with many unexpected detours and hidden chambers, and one that continues to evolve, finding new forms and new themes.<p> Peter Straub, a contemporary master of literary horror and fantasy, offers an authoritative and diverse gathering of stories calculated to unsettle and delight, in styles ranging from the exquisitely insinuating speculations of Henry James's "The Jolly Corner" to the nightmarish post-apocalyptic savagery of Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream." Ghostly narratives of the Edwardian era, lurid classics from the pulp heyday of <i>Weird Tales</i>, latter-day masterpieces by Shirley Jackson, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, Joyce Carol Oates, and Steven Millhauser: over 80 stories in all, with a generous selection of contemporary authors who continue to push the genre in new and startling directions.</p>
82Unsettling America: An Anthology of Contemporary Multicultural PoetryMaria Mazziotti Gillan0<p><b>Maria Mazziotti Gillan</b> is an awardwinning poet and instructor whose volumes of poetry include <i>Where I Come From</i>, <i>Things My Mother Told Me</i>, and <i>What We Pass On: Collected Poems 1980-2009</i>. Her work has been appeared in a number of publications, including <i>Boderlands</i>, <i>Prairie Schooner</i>, <i>Los Angeles Review</i>, the <i>Christian Science Monitor</i>, and the <i>New York Times</i>. She is the director of the creative writing program at Binghampton University—State University of New York and the executive director of the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College.&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Jennifer Gillan</b> is a professor of English and Media Studies at Bentley University. Her other books include <i>Television &amp; New Media: Must-Click TV</i>, <i>Understanding Reality TV</i>, and <i>Identity Lessons</i>, coedited with Maria Mazziotti Gillan.</p>Maria Mazziotti Gillan (Editor), Jennifer Gillanunsettling-americamaria-mazziotti-gillan9780140237788014023778X$16.16PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)November 1994Poetry Anthologies, American Poetry, American Literature Anthologies4326.02 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 0.94 (d)<p class="null1">A multicultural array of poets explore what it is means to be American&nbsp;</p> <p>This powerful and moving collection of poems stretches across the boundaries of skin color, language, ethnicity, and religion to give voice to the lives and experiences of ethnic Americans. With extraordinary honesty, dignity, and insight, these poems address common themes of assimilation, communication, and self-perception. In recording everyday life in our many American cultures, they displace the myths and stereotypes that pervade our culture.</p> <p><i>Unsettling America</i> includes work by:<br> &nbsp;<br> Amiri Baraka Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni Rita Dove Louise Erdich Jessica Hagedorn Joy Harjo Garrett Hongo Li-Young Lee Pat Mora Naomi Shihab Nye Marye Percy Ishmael Reed Alberto Rios Ntozake Shange Gary Soto Lawrence Ferlinghetti Nellie Wong David Hernandez Mary TallMountain<br> &nbsp;<br> ...and many more.</p> <p>With extraordinary honesty, dignity, and insight, an impressive array of poets displace the myths and stereotypes that pervade our culture. The first multicultural poetry anthology to give voice to the lives and experiences of ethnic Americans. </p><p>This powerful and moving collection of poems stretches across the boundaries of skin color, language, ethnicity, and religion to give voice to the lives and experiences of ethnic Americans. With extraordinary honesty, dignity, and insight, these poems address common themes of assimilation, communication, and self-perception. In recording everyday life in our many American cultures, they displace the myths and stereotypes that pervade our culture.</p><p>Unsettling America Acknowledgments Introductions</p> <p><b>Uprooting</b><br> Nellie Wong<br> <i>Where is My Country?<br> Dreams in Harrison Railroad Park</i></p> <p>Luis J. Rodrigues<br> <i>Heavy Blue Veins We Never Stopped Crossing Borders</i></p> <p>Lamont B. Steptoe<br> <i>Wired In Such a Boat of Land</i></p> <p>Jimmy Santiago Baca<br> <i>Immigrants in Our Own Land</i></p> <p>Marylin Chin<br> <i>We Are Americas Now, We Live in the Tundra</i></p> <p>Pat Mora<br> <i>Elena</i></p> <p>Ruth Lisa Schechter<br> <i>What Were You Patching?</i></p> <p>Quincy Troupe<br> <i>In Texas Grass</i></p> <p>Lawrence Ferlinghetti<br> <i>The Old Italians Dying</i></p> <p>Adrian C. Louis<br> <i>Dust World</i></p> <p>Shirley Geok-lin Lim<br> <i>Father from Aisa</i></p> <p>Hamod (Sam)<br> <i>from Moving</i></p> <p>James Masao Mitsui<br> <i>Katori Maru, October 1920</i></p> <p>Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni<br> <i>Restroom The Brides Come to Yuba City</i></p> <p>Yvonne V. Sapia<br> <i>Grandmother, a Caribbean Indian, Described by My Father</i></p> <p>Louise Erdrich<br> <i>Indian Boarding School: The Runaways</i></p> <p>Gary Soto<br> <i>Braly Street</i></p> <p>Joy Harjo<br> <i>The Woman Hanging from the Thirteenth Floor Window</i></p> <p>Shalin Hai-Jew<br> <i>Kinged</i></p> <p>Mary Jo Bona<br> <i>Dream Poem</i></p> <p>Mary Tallmountain<br> <i>The Last Wolf</i></p> <p>Gregg Shapiro<br> <i>Tattoo</i></p> <p>Lawson Fusao Inada<br> <i>Father of My Father</i></p> <p>Justin Vitiello<br> <i>Letter to a Cretan Flute-Maker</i></p> <p>David Meltzer<br> <i>What Do I Know of Journey</i></p> <p>Carole Bernstien<br> <i>When My Grandmother Said Pussy</i></p> <p>Cheryl Clarke<br> <i>14th Street Was Gutted in 1968</i></p> <p>Robert Carnevale<br> <i>Walking by the Cliffside Dyeworks</i></p> <p>Pedro Peitro<br> <i>The Old Buildings</i></p> <p>Dwight Okita<br> <i>In Response to Executive Order 9066<br> The Nice Thing About Counting Stars</i></p> <p>Shirley Kaufman<br> <i>Next Year, in Jerusalem</i></p> <p>Philip Levine<br> <i>The Survivor</i></p> <p>Lucille Clifton<br> <i>Sam</i></p> <p><b>Performing</b><br> Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni<br> <i>Indian Movie, New Jersey</i></p> <p>Louise Erdrich<br> <i>Dear John Wayne</i></p> <p>Nellie Wong<br> <i>When I Was Growing Up</i></p> <p>Janice Mirikitani<br> <i>Doreen</i></p> <p>Safiya Henderson-Holmes<br> <i>Failure of an Invention</i></p> <p>Chrystos<br> <i>Today Was a Bad Day Like TB</i></p> <p>Jessica Hagedorn<br> <i>Filipino Boogie</i></p> <p>Mary TallMountain<br> <i>Indian Blood</i></p> <p>Miguel Algarin<br> <i>At the Electronic Frontier</i></p> <p>Sherman Alexie<br> <i>Vision (2)<br> Translated from the American</i></p> <p>Michael S. Weaver<br> <i>Imitation of Life The Black and White Galaxie Blind Solo</i></p> <p>Sandra Mortola Gilbert<br> <i>Mafioso</i></p> <p>Barry Seiler<br> <i>Digging in the Streets of Gold</i></p> <p>Susan Clements<br> <i>Matinee Deer Cloud</i></p> <p>Nellie Wong<br> <i>Can't Tell</i></p> <p>Mary Jo Bona<br> <i>Amazone</i></p> <p>Patricia Smith<br> <i>Blonde White Women</i></p> <p>Mitsuye Yamada<br> <i>Cincinnati American Sun</i></p> <p>Arthur L. Clements<br> <i>Why I Don't Speak Italian</i></p> <p>Grace Cavalieri<br> <i>The First</i></p> <p>Michael Warr<br> <i>Brian on Ice: The El Train Poem Malcolm Is 'Bout More Than Wareing a Cap</i></p> <p>Joseph Papaleo<br> <i>American Dream: First Report</i></p> <p>Gerald Stern<br> <i>Behaving Like a Jew</i></p> <p>Denise Nico Leto<br> <i>The Mary Morelle Show</i></p> <p>David Mura<br> <i>To H.N.</i></p> <p>Marge Piercy<br> <i>My Rich Uncle, Whom I Only Met Three Times</i></p> <p>Yusef Komunyakaa<br> <i>Untitiled Blues</i></p> <p>Jennifer Lagier<br> <i>Second Class Citizen</i></p> <p>Shalin Hai-Jew<br> <i>Three Gypsies</i></p> <p>Patricia Smith from <i>Sweet Daddy What It's Like to Be a Black Girl (for Those of You Who Aren't)</i></p> <p>Shirley Geok-lin Lim<br> <i>Starlight Haven Black and White</i></p> <p>Jesse F. Garcia<br> <i>Barrio Beato</i></p> <p>David Hernandez<br> <i>Welcome</i></p> <p>Reuben Jackson<br> <i>Tee Big Chill Variations Albert James</i></p> <p>William J. Harris<br> <i>A Daddy Poem</i></p> <p>Sonia Sanchez<br> <i>Song No. 3</i></p> <p>Lucille Clifton<br> <i>Song at Midnight</i></p> <p>Allison Joseph<br> <i>Junior High Dance</i></p> <p>June Jordan<br> <i>What Would I Do White?</i></p> <p>Jimmy Santiago Baca<br> <i>So Mexicans Are Taking Jobs from Americans</i></p> <p>Haki R. Madhubuti<br> <i>Poet: What Ever Happened to Luther?</i></p> <p>Adrian C. Louis<br> <i>The Great Wingless Bird</i></p> <p>Pat Mora<br> <i>Immigrants Depression Days</i></p> <p>Toi Derricotte<br> <i>A Note on My Son's Face Blackbottom</i></p> <p>Shirley Geok-lin Lim<br> <i>Lost Name Woman</i></p> <p>Martin Espada<br> <i>Coca-Cola and Coco Frio</i></p> <p><b>Naming</b><br> Pat Mora<br> <i>Senora X No More</i></p> <p>Hamod (Sam)<br> <i>Dying with the Wrong Name Leaves</i></p> <p>Marilyn Chin<br> <i>How I Got That Name Elegy for Chloe Nguyen</i></p> <p>Martin Espada<br> <i>Niggerlips From an Island You Cannot Name</i></p> <p>Nellie Wong<br> <i>Mama, Come Back</i></p> <p>Enid Dame<br> <i>On the Road to Damascus, Maryland</i></p> <p>Felix Stefanile<br> <i>How I Changed My Name, Felice</i></p> <p>Janice Mirikitani<br> <i>Jade</i></p> <p>Lyn Lifshin<br> <i>Being Jewish in a Small Town</i></p> <p>Janice Gould<br> <i>We Exist</i></p> <p>Ishmael Reed<br> <i>Jacket Notes</i></p> <p>Helen Barolini<br> <i>Having the Wrong Name for Mr. Wright</i></p> <p>Dixie Salazar<br> <i>Taking It Back Pinon Nuts</i></p> <p>Kimiko Hahn<br> <i>The Hula Skirt, 1959</i></p> <p>Julia Lilsella<br> <i>Song of the Third Generation</i></p> <p>Amiri Baraka<br> <i>Ka 'Ba Funk Lore</i></p> <p>Daniela Gioseffo<br> <i>American SOnnets for My Father</i></p> <p>David Hernandez<br> <i>Pigeons</i></p> <p>June Jordan<br> <i>A Poem about Intelligence for My Brothers and Sisters</i></p> <p>Denise Nico Leto<br> <i>For Talking</i></p> <p>Alberto Alvaro Rios<br> <i>The Language of Great-Aunts Nani</i></p> <p>Carol Lee Saffioti<br> <i>Espresso</i></p> <p>Milton Kessler<br> <i>Secret Love</i></p> <p>Mary TallMountain<br> <i>Good Grease</i></p> <p>Vittoria Repetto<br> <i>6th Grade-Our Lady of Pompeii</i></p> <p>Claire Kageyama<br> <i>Mama</i></p> <p>Michael S. Glaser<br> <i>Preparations for Seder Changing Address Books</i></p> <p>Peter Blue Cloud<br> <i>Crazy Horse Monument</i></p> <p>Liz Rosenberg from <i>Prose Poems</i></p> <p>Giovanna (Janet) Capone<br> <i>In Answer to Their Questions</i></p> <p>Luci Tapahonso<br> <i>All I Want</i></p> <p>Stanley H. Barkan<br> <i>Two Grandmas</i></p> <p>Sandra Maria Esteves<br> <i>South Bronx Testimonials</i></p> <p>Dale M. Kushner<br> <i>Grandma in the Shower</i></p> <p>Tino Villanueva<br> <i>Haciendo Apenas la Recoleccion</i></p> <p>Rachel Guido deVrries<br> <i>On Alabama Ave., Paterson, NJ, 1954</i></p> <p>Ntozake Shange<br> <i>From Okra to Greens</i></p> <p>Rose Romano<br> <i>But My Blood So I Lost My Temper</i></p> <p>Maxine Kumin<br> <i>For My Great-Grandfather: A Message Long Overdue</i></p> <p>Alfred Encarnacion<br> <i>Bulosan Listens to a Recording of Robert Johnson</i></p> <p>Maryfrances Cusumano Wagner<br> <i>Miss Clement's Second Grade</i></p> <p>Lisa Suhair Majaj<br> <i>Recognized Futures</i></p> <p>Michael S. Weaver<br> <i>The Left Bank Jazz Society</i></p> <p>Naomi Shihab Nye<br> <i>Bllod</i></p> <p>Li-Young Lee<br> <i>Mnemonic The Gift</i></p> <p>Nikki Giovanni<br> <i>Nikki-Rosa Legacies</i></p> <p>James Masao Mitsui<br> <i>Because of My Father's Job</i></p> <p>Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni<br> <i>Yuba City School</i></p> <p>Gregory Djanikian<br> <i>How I Learned English</i></p> <p><b>Negotiating</b><br> Gregory Djanikian<br> <i>In the Elementary School Choir When I First Saw Snow</i></p> <p>Gary Soto<br> <i>Black Hair The Elements of San Joaquin Behind Grandma's House</i></p> <p>Luis J. Rodriguez<br> <i>Always Running Fire</i></p> <p>Gerald Stern<br> <i>The Dancing</i></p> <p>Maria Mazziotti Gillan<br> <i>In Memory We Are Walking</i></p> <p>Lyn Lifshin<br> <i>I Remember Haifa Being Lovely But</i></p> <p>Michael S. Weaver<br> <i>A Black Man's Sonata Improvisation for Piano</i></p> <p>Garrett Hongo<br> <i>Winnings</i></p> <p>Susan Clements<br> <i>Susans The Reservation</i></p> <p>Michael S. Glaser<br> <i>English-Speaking Persons Will Find Translations</i></p> <p>Sherman Alexie<br> <i>Crazy Horse Speaks Powwow Polaroid</i></p> <p>Cyrus Cassells<br> <i>Soul Make a Path Through Shouting</i></p> <p>Safiya Henderson-Holmes<br> <i>The Battle, Over and Over Again</i></p> <p>Louis Simpson<br> <i>A Story About Chicken Soup</i></p> <p>Yusef Komunyakaa<br> <i>Salt</i></p> <p>Adrian C. Louis<br> <i>Something About Being an Indian</i></p> <p>Lorna Dee Cervantes<br> <i>Poem for the Young White Man Who Asked Me How I, an Intelligent, Well-Read Person, Could Believe in the War Between Races</i></p> <p>Lamont B. Steptoe<br> <i>Election Time</i></p> <p>Daniela Gioseffi<br> <i>Bicentennial Anti-Poem for Italian-American Women</i></p> <p>Lyn Lifshin<br> <i>The Yahrtzeit Light After the Anti-Semitic Calls on a Local Talk Station</i></p> <p>Amiri Baraka<br> <i>An Agony, As Now</i></p> <p>Dwight Okita<br> <i>Notes for a Poem on Being Asian American</i></p> <p>Chrystos<br> <i>Portrait of Assimilation</i></p> <p>Stewart Florsheim<br> <i>The Jewish Singles Event</i></p> <p>Michael Plama<br> <i>Coming of Age</i></p> <p>Laura Boss<br> <i>At the Muclear Rally The Candy Lady</i></p> <p>Naomi Shihab Nye<br> <i>My Father and the Figtree</i></p> <p>Cherrie Moraga<br> <i>Half-Breed</i></p> <p>Shirley Geok-lin-Lim<br> <i>Modern Secrets</i></p> <p>Elizabeth Cook-Lynn<br> <i>Grandfather at the Indian Health Clinic</i></p> <p>Joseph Bruchac<br> <i>Birdfoot's Granpa</i></p> <p>Richard Michelson<br> <i>Undressing Aunt Frieda</i></p> <p>William J. Harris<br> <i>Rib Sandwich</i></p> <p>Wing Tek Lum<br> <i>Going Home</i></p> <p>Miriam Goodman<br> <i>Upkeep</i></p> <p>David Hernandez<br> <i>Armitage Shank</i></p> <p>Ruth Whitman<br> <i>Laughing Gas</i></p> <p>Arthur L. Clements<br> <i>Elegy</i></p> <p>Diana Chang<br> <i>Foreign Ways</i></p> <p>Robert Viscusi<br> <i>Autobiography</i></p> <p>Gloria Anzaldua<br> <i>Horse</i></p> <p>Simon J. Ortiz<br> <i>Travels in the South</i></p> <p>Grace Cavalieri<br> <i>Grandmother</i></p> <p>Maxine Kumin<br> <i>Living Alone with Jesus</i></p> <p>Lucia Maria Perillo<br> <i>The Sweaters</i></p> <p>Linda Hogan<br> <i>Heritage</i></p> <p>Victoria Lena Manyarrows<br> <i>Lakota Sister/Cherokee Mother</i></p> <p>Rita Dove<br> <i>Wingfoot Lake</i></p> <p>Hamod (Sam)<br> <i>After the Funeral of Assam Hamady</i></p> <p>Safiya Henderson-Holmes<br> <i>Friendly Town 1<br> My First Riot: Bronx, NYC</i></p> <p>Linda Hogan<br> <i>The Truth Is</i></p> <p>Audre Lorde<br> <i>Hanging Fire</i></p> <p>Debi Kang Dean<br> <i>In the Way Back</i></p> <p>Gloria Anzaldúa<br> <i>Cultures</i></p> <p><b>Re-Envisioning</b><br> Li-Young Lee<br> <i>I Ask My Mother to Sing</i></p> <p>Chrystos<br> <i>I Walk in the History of My People I Have Not Signed a Treaty with the United States Government The Real Indian Leans Against</i></p> <p>Lucille Clifton<br> <i>Night Vision In the Inner City</i></p> <p>Marilyn Nelson Waniek<br> <i>The House on Moscow Street</i></p> <p>Alma Luz Villanueva<br> <i>To Jesus Villanueva, with Love They Didn't Get Me My People Are the COlor of the Earth</i></p> <p>Nellie Wong<br> <i>From a Heart of Rice Straw</i></p> <p>Diane di Prima<br> <i>April Fool Birthday Poem for Grandpa</i></p> <p>Martin Espada<br> <i>Bully</i></p> <p>Joy Harpo<br> <i>Anchorage For Alva Benson, and for Those Who Have Learned to Speak</i></p> <p>Wing Tek Lum<br> <i>Chinese Hot Pot</i></p> <p>Enid Dame<br> <i>The Seder</i></p> <p>Rose Romano<br> <i>The Bucket</i></p> <p>Luis J. Rodriguez<br> <i>Speaking with Hands</i></p> <p>Michael S. Harper<br> <i>Song: I Want a Witness</i></p> <p>Josê Angel Villalongo, Sr.<br> <i>In the Good Old U.S.A.</i></p> <p>Victoria Lena Manyarrows<br> <i>Today We Will Not Be Invisible Nor Silent</i></p> <p>Quincy Troupe<br> <i>The View from Skates in Berkeley</i></p> <p>Shirley Geok-lin Lim<br> <i>I Defy You</i></p> <p>Joseph Bruchac<br> <i>Prayer</i></p> <p>Alicia Ostriker<br> <i>Lamenting the Inevitable</i></p> <p>Kyoko Mori<br> <i>Speaking Through White: For My Mother</i></p> <p>Kimberly M. Blaeser<br> <i>Certificate of Live Birth</i></p> <p>Pat Mora<br> <i>Cortez'a horse</i></p> <p>Jesús Papoleto Meléndez<br> <i>Oye Mundo/Sometimes</i></p> <p>E. Ethelbert Miller<br> <i>The Men</i></p> <p>Linda Hogan<br> <i>The New Apartment: Minneapolis</i></p> <p>Al Young<br> <i>A Dance for Ma Rainey</i></p> <p>Jesse F. Garcia<br> <i>I Ain't GOing to Hurry No More</i></p> <p>Ray Gonzalez<br> <i>Praise the Tortilla, Praise the Menudo, Praise the Chorizo</i></p> <p>Amina Baraka<br> <i>The Last Word</i></p> <p>David Hernandez<br> <i>Martin and My Father</i></p> <p>Laura Boss<br> <i>My Ringless Fingers on the Steering Wheel Tell the Story</i></p> <p>Cyrus Cassells<br> <i>The Women</i></p> <p>Luci Tapahonso<br> <i>I Am Singing Now</i></p> <p>Safiya Hnderson-Holmes<br> <i>To Hell and Back, with Cake Friendly Town 3</i></p> <p>Cathy Song<br> <i>Out of Our Hands</i></p> <p>Peter Blue Cloud<br> <i>The Old Man's Lazy</i></p> <p>Robert Creeley<br> <i>America</i></p> <p>Wendy Rose<br> <i>Naayawva Taawi Story Keeper</i></p> <p>Alan Chong Lau<br> <i>The Upside Down Basket</i></p> <p>Pat Mora<br> <i>La Migra</i></p> <p>Judith Ortiz Cofer<br> <i>What the Gypsy Said to Her Children</i></p> <p>Marilyn Chin<br> <i>The Floral Apron</i></p> <p>Joy Harjo<br> <i>I Give You Back</i></p> <p>Cherrie Moraga<br> <i>For the Color of My Mother</i></p> <p>Sonia Sanchez<br> <i>Present Norma An Anthem</i></p> <p>Maria Mazziotti Gillan<br> <i>Arturo Public School No. 18: Paterson New Jersey Growing Up Italian</i></p> <p> Contributors</p>
83Listening For God Reader, Vol 1Paula J. Carlson0Paula J. Carlson (Editor), Peter S. Hawkins (Editor), Peter S. Hawkinslistening-for-god-reader-vol-1paula-j-carlson97808066271510806627158$13.43PaperbackAugsburg Fortress, PublishersAugust 1994New EditionFaith, Literature Anthologies - General & Miscellaneous, General & Miscellaneous Christian Life, American Literature Anthologies1640.35 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)Never before has a resource touched upon the issues of life and faith in such a personal way. Excellent contemporary literature helps one realize the presence of God in many places and relationships. Each volume of <i>Listening for God</i> includes excerpts from the works of eight contemporary authors, supplemented by author profiles and reflection questions. A Leader Guide, offering suggestions for organizing class time and responding to reflection questions is also available.<p>Where do you listen for God? In this new collection of stories and essays, the challenge is to pay attention everywhere. <I>Listening for God</i> is a resource intended to help readers investigate how life and faith merge in surprising ways and places. Contemporary American literature may not be the most predictable place to listen for God, but it may well turn out to be among the most rewarding.</p><table> <tr><td>Introduction</td></tr> <tr><td>1. Flannery O'Connor</td></tr> <tr><td>Revelation</td></tr> <tr><td>2. Frederick Buechner</td></tr> <tr><td>The Dwarves in the Stable</td></tr> <tr><td>3. Patricia Hampl</td></tr> <tr><td>Chapter 6 from Virgin Time</td></tr> <tr><td>4. Raymond Carver</td></tr> <tr><td>A Small Good Thing</td></tr> <tr><td>5. Annie Dillard</td></tr> <tr><td>The Deer at Providencia</td></tr> <tr><td>A Field of Silence</td></tr> <tr><td>6. Alice Walker</td></tr> <tr><td>The Welcome Table</td></tr> <tr><td>7. Garrison Keillor</td></tr> <tr><td>Exiles</td></tr> <tr><td>Aprille</td></tr> <tr><td>8. Richard Rodriguez</td></tr> <tr><td>Credo</td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> </table>
84Concise Anthology of American LiteratureJames Leonard0<p><b>JAMES S. LEONARD</b> received his Ph.D. from Brown University, and is Professor of English (and former English Department chair) at The Citadel. He is the editor of <i>Making Mark Twain Work in the Classroom</i> (Duke University Press, 1999), coeditor of <i>Authority and Textuality: Current Views of Collaborative Writing</i> (Locust Hill Press, 1994) and <i>Satire or Evasion? Black Perspectives on Huckleberry Finn</i> (Duke University Press, 1992), and coauthor of <i>The Fluent Mundo: Wallace Stevens and the Structure of Reality</i></p> <p>(University of Georgia Press, 1988). He has served as president of the Mark Twain Circle</p> <p>of America (2010–2012), managing editor of <i>The Mark Twain Annual</i> (since 2004), and editor of the <i>Mark Twain Circular</i> (1987–2008), and is a major contributor to <i>The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Poets and Poetry</i> (Greenwood Press, 2006) and <i>American History Through Literature</i> (Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2005).</p> <p><b>SHELLEY FISHER FISHKIN</b> is Professor of English and Director of American Studies at Stanford University. She is the author, editor, or coeditor of over forty books, including the award-winning <i>Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African American Voices</i> (1993), <i>From Fact to Fiction: Journalism and Imaginative Writing in America</i> (1988), and <i>Feminist Engagements: Forays into American Literature and Culture</i> (2009), as well as <i>Lighting Out for the Territory</i> (1997), <i>The Oxford Mark Twain</i> (1996), <i>The Historical</i></p> <p><i>Guide to Mark Twain</i> (2002), <i>Mark Twain‘s Book of Animals</i> (2009), <i>The Mark Twain Anthology:Great Writers on his Life and Work</i> (2010), <i>Is He Dead? A Comedy in Three Acts by Mark Twain</i> (2003), <i>People of the Book: Thirty Scholars Reflect on Their Jewish Identity</i> (with Jeffrey Rubin-Dorsky) (1996), <i>Listening to Silences: New Essays in Feminist Criticism</i> (with Elaine Hedges)(1994), and <i>Sport of the Gods and Other Essential Writings by Paul Laurence Dunbar</i> (with David Bradley) (2005). She has also published more than eighty articles, essays, or reviews in publications including <i>American Quarterly, American Literature, Journal of American History, American Literary History,</i> and the <i>New York Times Book Review,</i> and has lectured on American literature in Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea,</p> <p>Mexico, the Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom,</p> <p>and throughout the United States. A member of the first class of women to graduate from Yale College, she stayed on at Yale to earn her M.A. in English and her Ph.D. in American Studies. Before her arrival at Stanford, she directed the Poynter Fellowship</p> <p>in Journalism at Yale and taught American Studies and English at the University</p> <p>of Texas at Austin, where she chaired the American Studies Department. She co-founded the Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society and is a past president of the Mark Twain Circle of America and the American Studies Association.</p> <p><b>DAVID BRADLEY</b> earned a BA in Creative Writing at the University of Pennsylvania in 1972 and a MA in United States Studies at the University of London in 1974. A Professor of English at Temple University from 1976 to 1997, Bradley has been a visiting professor at the San Diego State University, the University of California—San Diego, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Colgate University, the College of William &amp;</p> <p>Mary, the City College of the City University of New York and the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas, Austin. He is currently an Associate Professor of Fiction in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Oregon. Bradley has read and lectured extensively in the United States and also in Japan, Korea, Pakistan, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia. He is the author of two novels, <i>South Street</i> (1975) and <i>The Chaneysville Incident</i> (1981) which was awarded the 1982 PEN/Faulkner Award and an Academy Award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. His non-fiction has appeared in <i>Esquire</i>, <i>Redbook</i>, <i>The New York Times</i>, <i>The Los Angeles Times</i> and <i>The New Yorker.</i> A recipient of fellowships from the John Simon</p> <p>Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts His most recent publication is semi-scholarly: <i>The Essential Writings of Paul Laurence Dunbar</i>, which he co-edited with Shelley Fisher Fishkin. His current works in progress include a creative non-fiction book, <i>The Bondage Hypothesis: Meditations on Race, History and America,</i> a novel-in-stories, <i>Raystown,</i> and an essay collection: <i>Lunch Bucket Pieces: New and Selected Creative Nonfiction</i></p> <p><b>DANA D. NELSON</b></p> <p>received her Ph.D. from Michigan State, and she is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of <i>The Word in Black and White: Reading “Race” in American Literature, 1638–1867</i> (1992), <i>National Manhood: Capitalist Citizenship and the Imagined Fraternity of White Men</i> (1998), and <i>Bad for Democracy: How the Presidency Undermines the Power of the People</i> (2008) as well as editor of several reprint editions of nineteenth-century American female writers (including Rebecca Rush, Lydia Maria Child, Fanny Kemble, and Frances Butler Leigh). Her teaching interests include comparative American colonial literatures, developing democracy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, ethnic and minority literatures, women’s literature, and frontier representations in literature. She has served or is serving on numerous editorial boards, including <i>American Literature, Early American Literature, American Literary History, Arizona Quarterly,</i> and <i>American Quarterly.</i> She is an active member of the Modern Language Association and the American Studies Association. She is currently working on a book that studies developing practices and representations of democracy in the late British colonies and the early United States.</p> <p><b>JOSEPH CSICSILA</b> is Professor of English Language and Literature at Eastern Michigan University and a specialist in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature and culture. He is the author and/or editor of five books including <i>Canons by Consensus:</i></p> <p><i>Critical Trends and American Literature Anthologies</i> (2004), which is the first systematic study of American literature textbooks used by college instructors in the past century, <i>Centenary Reflections on Mark Twain’s No. 44</i>, <i>The Mysterious Stranger</i> (2009), and <i>Heretical Fictions: Religion in the Literature of Mark Twain</i> (2010). He has also published numerous articles on such authors as Mary Wilkins Freeman, Sarah Orne Jewett, and William Faulkner. Csicsila has served as the editor of <i>Journal of Narrative Theory</i> and is currently book review editor for <i>The Mark Twain Annual</i>.</p>James Leonard, David Bradley, George McMichael, Dana Nelson, Shelley Fisher Fishkinconcise-anthology-of-american-literaturejames-leonard97802057631080205763103$92.38PaperbackPrentice HallJanuary 20107th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies23686.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.10 (d)<p><b>Student Edition</b>:</p> <p>After careful thought, your professor assigned McMichael’s <i>Concise Anthology of American Literature, Seventh Edition</i> for your course. This anthology is rich in contextual content, giving you the historical events that influenced the writing of these renowned American authors which leads to a greater understanding of the selections. Well-established authors are joined by a wide array of selections by women and writers of color, including both African Americans and Native Americans.</p> <p>What’s New in the Seventh Edition:</p> <ul> <li>Artworks and historical photos give greater meaning to historical events and selections, such as an artist’s rendition of the signing of the Declaration of Independence and a photo of Civil War devastation in Charleston, South Carolina.</li> <li>Twenty new authors, representing diverse cultural backgrounds, increase the number of contemporary authors which is always enjoyable reading.</li> <li>Eavesdrop into the romance of John and Abigail Adams by reading their romantic letters. Share the trauma of the Vietnam War through the eyes of a young soldier.</li> <li>Four groundbreaking plays will captivate you and help you understand the role of theater in America through the centuries.</li> <li>The speeches by legendary leaders, such as Martin Luther King and Booker T. Washington, and have stood the test of time and inspire us today. If you were wishing that you had a copy of President Barack Obama’s 2009 Inaugural Address, you’ll find it here.</li> </ul><p><P>This consise anthology offers a balanced approach to the enjoyment of reading American literature. Over 20 new authors representing diverse cultural backgrounds allow students to read about unique experiences through the eyes of esteemed writers including Sonia Sanchez, Sherman Alexie, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Frances E.W. Harper. New historical documents, including the romantic letters exchanged by John and Abigail Adams and an account of the Vietnam War through the eyes of a young soldier, provide an understanding for student readers. Four groundbreaking dramas (from the 18<sup>th</sup> century&#58; Slaves in Algiers, by Susanna Haswell Rowson; from the 19<sup>th</sup> century&#58; The Escape, by William Wells Brown; from the early 20<sup>th</sup> century&#58; Trifles, by Susan Glaspell; and from the late 20<sup>th</sup> century&#58; Fences, by August Wilson) help students understand the role of theater in America through the centuries. Speeches by Legendary Leaders include Martin Luther King&rsquo;s unforgettable &ldquo;I Have a Dream&rdquo; speech and Booker T. Washington&rsquo;s historical Atlanta Exposition Address in addition to Barack Obama&rsquo;s 2009 Inaugural Address.</p><P>The Literature of Early America 1<p>Reading the Historical Context <p>CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1451&ndash;1506)<p>Letter Describing His First Voyage<p>THOMAS HARIOT (1560&ndash;1621)<p>FROM <i>A Brief and True Report of the Newfound Land of Virginia Of the Nature and Manners of the People<p></i>JOHN WINTHROP (1588&ndash;1649) AND ANNE HUTCHINSON (1591&ndash;1643)<p>FROM<i>The Examination of Mrs. Anne Hutchinson at the Court at Newton November 1637<p></i>THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE<p>FROM <i>The Constitution of the Five Nations </i><p>Literature of Early America <p>CAPTAIN JOHN SMITH (1580&ndash;1631)<p>FROM <i>The General History of Virginia&#58;</i><p>The Third Book<p>Powhatan&rsquo;s Discourse of Peace and War<p>WILLIAM BRADFORD (1590&ndash;1657),<p>FROM <i>Of Plymouth Plantation</i><p>Chapter I&#58; The Separatist Interpretation of the Reformation in England, 1550&ndash;1607<p>Chapter III&#58; Of Their Settling in Holland, and Their Manner of Living<p>Chapter IV&#58; Showing the Reasons and Causes of Their Removal<p>Chapter VII&#58; Of Their Departure from Leyden<p>Chapter IX&#58; Of Their Voyage<p>Chapter X&#58; Showing How They Sought Out a Place of Habitation<p>Chapter XI&#58; The Mayflower Compact<p>Chapter XII&#58; Narragansett Challenge<p>Chapter XIV&#58; End of the &ldquo;Common Course . . .&rdquo;<p>Chapter XXIV&#58; Mr. Roger Williams<p>Chapter XXVIII&#58; The Pequot War<p>Chapter XXXVI&#58; Wiinslow&rsquo;s Final Departure<p>JOHN WINTHROP(1588&ndash;1649),<p>From <i>The Journal of John Winthrop </i><p>ANNE BRADSTREET (C. 1612&ndash;1672)<p>The Prologue<p>Contemplations<p>The Flesh and the Spirit<p>The Author to Her Book<p>Before the Birth of One of Her Children<p>To My Dear and Loving Husband<p>A Letter to Her Husband Absent Upon Public Employment<p>In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet<p>On My Dear Grandchild Simon Bradstreet<p>[On Deliverance] from Another Sore Fit<p>Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666<p>As Weary Pilgrim<p>EDWARD TAYLOR (C. 1642&ndash;1729)<p>Prologue<p>FROM Preparatory Meditations<p>The Reflexion<p>Meditation 6 (First Series)<p>Meditation 8 (First Series)<p>Meditation 38 (First Series)<p>Meditation 150 (Second Series)<p>FROM God&rsquo;s Determinations<p>The Joy of Church Fellowship Rightly Attended<p>Upon a Spider Catching a Fly<p>Huswifery<p>The Ebb and Flow<p>A Fig for Thee Oh! Death<p>SAMUEL SEWALL (1652&ndash;1730)<p>The Selling of Joseph<p>FROM The Diary of Samuel Sewall<p>MARY ROWLANDSON (C. 1637&ndash;1711)<p>A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration<p>WILLIAM BYRD II (1674&ndash;1744)<p>FROM The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover, 1709&ndash;1712<p>JONATHAN EDWARDS (1703&ndash;1758)<p>Sarah Pierrepont<p>FROM A Divine and Supernatural Light<p>Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God<p>The Literature of the Eighteenth Century <p>Reading the Historical Context <p>CORRESPONDENCE<p>Thomas Jefferson to James Madison<p>Thomas Jefferson to John Adams<p>Abigail Adams to John Adams<p>John Adams to Abigail Adams<p>Benjamin Banneker to Thomas Jefferson<p>Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Banneker<p>THE FEDERALIST/ANTI-FEDERALIST CONTROVERSY<p>The Federalist No. 1 (Alexander Hamilton)<p>The Federalist No. 2 (John Jay)<p><p>Literature of the Eighteenth Century<p>BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (1706&ndash;1790)<p>FROM The Autobiography<p>Benjamin Franklin&rsquo;s Epitaph<p>FROM The Pennsylvania Gazette<p>The Witches of Mount Holly<p>Information to Those Who Would Remove to America<p>MICHEL-GUILLAUME-JEAN DE CR&Egrave;VECOEUR (1735&ndash;1813)<p>FROM Letters from an American Farmer<p>Letter III (What Is an American?)<p>Letter IX (Description of Charleston)<p>THOMAS PAINE (1737&ndash;1809)<p>FROM Common Sense<p>FROM The American Crisis<p>THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743&ndash;1826)<p>The Declaration of Independence<p>FROM Notes on the State of Virginia<p>FROM Query V&#58; Cascades<p>FROM Query VI&#58; Productions Mineral, Vegetable and Animal<p>FROM Query XVII&#58; Religion<p>FROM Query XVIII&#58; Manners<p>FROM Query XIX&#58; Manufactures<p>PHILLIS WHEATLEY (1754?&ndash;1784)<p>On Virtue<p>To the University of Cambridge, in New England<p>On Being Brought from Africa to America<p>On Imagination<p>To S. M. A Young African Painter, On Seeing His Works<p>To His Excellency General Washington<p>PHILIP FRENEAU (1752&ndash;1832)<p>The Power of Fancy<p>The Hurricane<p>To Sir Toby<p>The Wild Honey Suckle<p>The Indian Burying Ground<p>On the Universality and Other Attributes of the God of Nature<p>WILLIAM BARTRAM (1739&ndash;1823)<p>FROM Travels through North and South Carolina<p>SUSANNA HASWELL ROWSON (1762&ndash;1824)<p>Slaves in Algiers<p>RED JACKET (C. 1750-1830)<p>The Indians Must Worship the Great Spirit in Their Own Way<p>The Literature of the Early To Mid-Nineteenth Century<p>Reading the Historical Context<p>William Lloyd Garrison (1805&ndash;1879)<p>On the Constitution and the Union<p>STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS (1813&ndash;1861)<p>FROM Third Joint Debate, at Jonesboro<p>WOMEN&rsquo;S RIGHTS CONVENTION, SENECA FALLS, NEW YORK (1848)<p>Declaration of Sentiments<p>Literature of the Early To Mid-Nineteenth Century <p>WASHINGTON IRVING (1783&ndash;1859)<p>FROM The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.<p>The Author&rsquo;s Account of Himself<p>Rip Van Winkle<p>The Legend of Sleepy Hollow<p>BLACK HAWK (1767&ndash;1838)<p>FROM Black Hawk&rsquo;s Autobiography<p>WILLIAM APESS (1798&ndash;1839)<p>Eulogy on King Philip<p>PENINA MO&Iuml;SE (1797&ndash;1880)<p>To Persecuted Foreigners<p>The Mirror and the Echo<p>To a Lottery Ticket<p>JAMES FENIMORE COOPER (1789&ndash;1851)<p>Preface to the Leather-Stocking Tales<p>FROM The Pioneers<p>FROM The Deerslayer<p>WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT (1794&ndash;1878)<p>Thanatopsis<p>To a Waterfowl<p>To Cole, the Painter, Departing for Europe<p>To the Fringed Gentian<p>The Prairies<p>Abraham Lincoln<p>EDGAR ALLAN POE (1809&ndash;1849)<p>Sonnet&mdash;To Science<p>To Helen<p>The City in the Sea<p>Sonnet&mdash;Silence<p>Lenore<p>The Raven<p>Annabel Lee<p>The Fall of the House of Usher<p>The Black Cat<p>The Purloined Letter<p>FROM &ldquo;Twice-Told Tales, by Nathaniel Hawthorne&rdquo; [A Review]<p>The Philosophy of Composition<p>RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803&ndash;1882)<p>Nature<p>Self-Reliance<p>The Rhodora<p>Each and All<p>Concord Hymn<p>The Problem<p>Ode<p>Hamatreya<p>Give All to Love<p>Days<p>Brahma<p>NATHANIEL PARKER WILLIS (1806&ndash;1867)<p>January 1, 1828<p>January 1, 1829<p>The Lady in the White Dress, I Helped into the Omnibus<p>MARIA STEWART (1803&ndash;1879)<p>An Address Delivered Before The Afric-American Female<p>Intelligence Society of America 6<p>GEORGE MOSES HORTON (1797&ndash;1883)<p>On Liberty and Slavery<p>The Lover&rsquo;s Farewell<p>On Hearing of the Intention of a Gentleman to Purchase the Poet&rsquo;s Freedom<p>Division of An Estate<p>Death of an Old Carriage Horse<p>George Moses Horton, Myself<p>NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE (1804&ndash;1864)<p>Young Goodman Brown<p>The Birth-Mark<p>Rappaccini&rsquo;s Daughter<p>HERMAN MELVILLE (1819&ndash;1891)<p>Bartleby, the Scrivener<p>Benito Cereno<p>The Portent<p>Shiloh<p>Malvern Hill<p>A Utilitarian View of the Monitor&rsquo;s Fight<p>The House-Top<p>The Swamp Angel<p>The College Colonel<p>The Tuft of Kelp<p>The Maldive Shark<p>The Berg<p>Art<p>Greek Architecture<p>LYDIA MARIA CHILD (1802&ndash;1880)<p>The Black Saxons<p>FREDERICK DOUGLASS (1818&ndash;1895)<p>FROM Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass<p>What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?<p>HENRY DAVID THOREAU(1817&ndash;1862)<p>Civil Disobedience<p>FROM Walden<p>I Economy<p>II Where I Lived, and What I Lived for<p>XII Brute Neighbors<p>XVIII Conclusion<p>They Who Prepare my Evening Meal Below<p>On Fields O&rsquo;er Which the Reaper&rsquo;s Hand Has Passed<p>Smoke<p>Conscience<p>My Life Has Been the Poem<p>WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS (1806&ndash;1870)<p>Grayling; or &ldquo;Murder Will Out&rdquo;<p>HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807&ndash;1882)<p>A Psalm of Life<p>The Arsenal at Springfield<p>The Jewish Cemetery at Newport<p>JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (1807&ndash;1892)<p>The Hunters of Men<p>The Farewell<p>Barbara Frietchie<p>JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL(1819&ndash;1891)<p>To the Dandelion<p>FROM A Fable for Critics<p>HARRIET BEECHER STOWE (1811&ndash;1896), FROM Uncle Tom&rsquo;s Cabin<p>Preface<p>Chapter I In Which the Reader Is Introduced to a Man of Humanity<p>Chapter VII The Mother&rsquo;s Struggle<p>FANNY FERN(1811&ndash;1872)<p>Aunt Hetty on Matrimony<p>Hints to Young Wives<p>The Tear of a Wife<p>Mrs. Adolphus Smith Sporting the &ldquo;Blue Stocking&rdquo;<p>Blackwell&rsquo;s Island<p>Blackwell&rsquo;s Island No. 3<p>Independence<p>The Working-Girls of New York<p>WILLIAM WELLS BROWN (1814&ndash;1884)<p>The Escape<p>HARRIET ANN JACOBS (1813&ndash;1897), FROM Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl<p>Chapter I Childhood<p>Chapter V The Trials of Girlhood<p>Chapter VI The Jealous Mistress<p>Chapter X A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girl&rsquo;s Life<p>Chapter XXI The Loophole of Retreat<p>Chapter XLI Free at Last<p>JAMES M. WHITFIELD (1822&ndash;1871)<p>America<p>ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809&ndash;1865)<p>To Horace Greeley<p>Gettysburg Address<p>Second Inaugural Address<p>FRANCES E. W. HARPER (1825&ndash;1911)<p>Bury Me in a Free Land<p>To the Union Savers of Cleveland<p>Eliza Harris<p>The Slave Mother<p>Learning to Read<p>Aunt Chloe&rsquo;s Politics<p>EMMA LAZARUS (1849&ndash;1887)<p>In the Jewish Synagogue at Newport<p>The New Colossus<p>1492<p>WALT WHITMAN (1819&ndash;1892) 1<p>Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass<p>Song of Myself<p>FROM Inscriptions<p>To You<p>One&rsquo;s-Self I Sing<p>When I Read the Book<p>I Hear America Singing<p>Poets to Come<p>FROM Children of Adam<p>From Pent-Up Aching Rivers<p>Out of the Rolling Ocean the Crowd<p>As Adam, Early in the Morning<p>Once I Pass&rsquo;d through a Populous City<p>FROM Calamus<p>What Think You I take My Pen In Hand?<p>I saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing<p>I Hear It Was Charged Against Me<p>Crossing Brooklyn Ferry<p>FROM Sea-Drift<p>Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking<p>FROM By the Roadside<p>When I Heard the Learn&rsquo;d Astronomer<p>The Dalliance of the Eagles<p>FROM Drum-Taps<p>Beat! Beat! Drums!<p>Cavalry Crossing a Ford<p>Bivouac on a Mountain Side<p>Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night<p>A sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim<p>The Wound-Dresser<p>FROM Memories of President Lincoln<p>When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom&rsquo;d<p>FROM Autumn Rivulets<p>There Was a Child Went Forth<p>Sparkles From the Wheel<p>Passage to India<p>FROM Whispers of Heavenly Death<p>A Noiseless Patient Spider<p>FROM Noon to Starry Night<p>To a Locomotive in Winter<p>EMILY DICKINSON (1830&ndash;1886)<p>49 I never lost as much but twice<p>67 Success is counted sweetest<p>165 A Wounded Deer&mdash;leaps highest<p>185 &ldquo;Faith&rdquo; is a fine invention<p>210 The thought beneath so slight a film<p>214 I taste a liquor never brewed<p>216 Safe in their Alabaster Chambers<p>241 I like a look of Agony<p>249 Wild Nights&mdash;Wild Nights!<p>258 There&rsquo;s a certain Slant of light<p>280 I felt a Funeral, in my Brain<p>303 The Soul selects her own Society<p>324 Some keep the Sabbath going to Church<p>328 A Bird came down the Walk<p>338 I know that He exists<p>341 After great pain, a formal feeling comes<p>401 What Soft&mdash;Cherubic Creatures<p>435 Much Madness is divinest Sense<p>441 This is my letter to the World<p>449 I died for Beauty&mdash;but was scarce<p>465 I heard a Fly buzz&mdash;when I died<p>520 I started Early&mdash;Took my Dog<p>585 I like to see it lap the Miles<p>632 The Brain&mdash;is wider than the sky<p>640 I cannot live with You<p>670 One need not be a Chamber&mdash;to be Haunted<p>709 Publication&mdash;is the Auction<p>712 Because I could not stop for Death<p>764 Presentiment&mdash;is that long Shadow&mdash;on the Lawn<p>976 Death is a Dialogue between<p>986 A narrow Fellow in the Grass<p>1052 I never saw a Moor<p>1078 The Bustle in a House<p>1129 Tell all the truth but tell it slant<p>1207 He preached upon &ldquo;Breadth&rdquo; till it argued him narrow<p>1463 A Route of Evanescence<p>1545 The Bible is an antique Volume<p>1624 Apparently with no surprise<p>1670 In Winter in my Room<p>1732 My life closed twice before its close<p>1755 To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee<p>1760 Elysium is as far as to<p>Letters to T. W. Higginson<p>The Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century <p><p>Reading the Historical Context<p>MARK TWAIN (SAMUEL L. CLEMENS) (1835&ndash;1910)<p>FROM Life on the Mississippi<p>[Sir Walter Scott and the Southern Character]<p>ALBION TOURG&Eacute;E (1838&ndash;1905)<p>FROM The Invisible Empire<p><p>Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century<p>MARK TWAIN (SAMUEL L. CLEMENS) (1835&ndash;1910)<p>The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County<p>Story of the Bad Little Boy<p>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn<p>A Salutation-Speech from the Nineteenth Century to the Twentieth<p>The War-Prayer<p>MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN (1852&ndash;1930)<p>A New England Nun<p>CHARLES WADDELL CHESNUTT (1858&ndash;1932)<p>The Goophered Grapevine<p>WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837&ndash;1920)<p>Editha<p>HENRY JAMES (1843&ndash;1916)<p>Daisy Miller&#58; A Study<p>The Jolly Corner<p>AMBROSE BIERCE (1842&ndash;1914)<p>An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge<p>CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860&ndash;1935)<p>The Yellow Wall-Paper<p>KATE CHOPIN (1851&ndash;1904)<p>The Storm<p>STEPHEN CRANE (1871&ndash;1900)<p>Black riders came from the sea<p>In the desert<p>A god in wrath<p>I saw a man pursuing the horizon<p>Supposing that I should have the courage<p>On the horizon the peaks assembled<p>A man feared that he might find an assassin<p>Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind<p>A man said to the universe<p>A man adrift on a slim spar<p>The Open Boat<p>FRANK NORRIS(1870&ndash;1902)<p>A Deal in Wheat<p>JACK LONDON(1876&ndash;1916)<p>The Law of Life<p>EDITH WHARTON (1862&ndash;1937)<p>The Other Two<p>PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR(1872&ndash;1906)<p>We Wear the Mask<p>An Ante-Bellum Sermon<p>When Malindy Sings<p>The Colored Soldiers<p>When Dey &lsquo;Listed Colored Soldiers<p>Sympathy 1<p>THEODORE DREISER(1871&ndash;1945)<p>The Lost Phoebe<p>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900 to 1945) <p>Reading the Historical Context <p>BOOKER T. WASHINGTON (1856&ndash;1915)<p>The Atlanta Exposition Address<p>Literature of the Twentieth Century<p>W. E. B. DU BOIS (1868&ndash;1963)<p>FROM The Souls of Black Folk<p>A Litany of Atlanta<p>EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON(1869&ndash;1935)<p>Richard Cory<p>Cliff Klingenhagen<p>Miniver Cheevy<p>How Annandale Went Out<p>Eros Turannos<p>Mr. Flood&rsquo;s Party<p>ROBERT FROST(1874&ndash;1963)<p>Mending Wall<p>Home Burial<p>After Apple-Picking<p>The Road Not Taken<p>An Old Man&rsquo;s Winter Night<p>Birches<p>The Oven Bird<p>For Once, Then, Something<p>Fire and Ice<p>Design<p>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening<p>GERTRUDE SIMMONS BONNIN (ZITKALA SA) (1876&ndash;1938)<p>FROM The School Days of an Indian Girl<p>CARL SANDBURG(1878&ndash;1967)<p>Chicago<p>Lost<p>Graceland<p>Fog<p>Psalm of Those Who Go Forth Before Daylight<p>WILLA CATHER(1873&ndash;1947)<p>Paul&rsquo;s Case<p>ELLEN GLASGOW (1873&ndash;1945)<p>The Shadowy Third<p>GERTRUDE STEIN(1874&ndash;1946)<p>Susie Asado<p>Picasso<p>A Movie<p>SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876&ndash;1941)<p>I Want to Know Why<p>JOHN DOS PASSOS (1896&ndash;1970)<p>FROM U.S.A.<p>Preface<p>FROM The 42nd Parallel<p>Proteus 1<p>FROM 1919<p>Newsreel XLIII<p>The Body of an American<p>FROM The Big Money<p>Newsreel LXVI<p>The Camera Eye (50)<p>FROM U.S.A<p>Vag<p>EUGENE O&rsquo;NEILL(1888&ndash;1953)<p>The Hairy Ape<p>SUSAN GLASPELL(1876&ndash;1948)<p>Trifles<p>EZRA POUND(1885&ndash;1972)<p>Portrait d&rsquo;une Femme<p>Salutation<p>A Pact<p>In a Station of the Metro<p>The River-Merchant&rsquo;s Wife&#58; A Letter<p>T. S. ELIOT(1888&ndash;1965)<p>The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock<p>Preludes<p>Sweeney Among the Nightingales<p>The Waste Land<p>Notes on &ldquo;The Waste Land&rdquo;<p>E. E. CUMMINGS(1894&ndash;1962)<p>[in Just-]<p>[O sweet spontaneous]<p>[Buffalo Bill&rsquo;s defunct]<p>[the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls]<p>[All in green went my love riding]<p>[when god lets my body be]<p>HART CRANE(1899&ndash;1932)<p>Chaplinesque<p>At Melville&rsquo;s Tomb<p>Voyages<p>FROM The Bridge<p>To Brooklyn Bridge<p>The Harbor Dawn<p>Van Winkle<p>EDGAR LEE MASTERS(1868&ndash;1950)<p>FROM Spoon River Anthology<p>Knowlt Hoheimer<p>Nellie Clark<p>Petit, the Poet<p>Anne Rutledge<p>Lucinda Matlock<p>EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY(1892&ndash;1950)<p>Spring<p>First Fig<p>[I shall forget you presently, my dear]<p>[Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare]<p>WALLACE STEVENS(1879&ndash;1955)<p>Peter Quince at the Clavier<p>Disillusionment of Ten O&rsquo;Clock<p>Domination of Black<p>Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird<p>The Snow Man<p>Anecdote of the Jar<p>A High-Toned Old Christian Woman<p>The Emperor of Ice-Cream<p>The Idea of Order at Key West<p>WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS(1883&ndash;1963)<p>Con Brio<p>The Young Housewife<p>Pastoral<p>Tract<p>Danse Russe<p>El Hombre<p>To a Solitary Disciple<p>Queenannslace<p>Portrait of a Lady<p>The Widow&rsquo;s Lament in Springtime<p>The Red Wheelbarrow<p>Between Walls<p>Landscape with the Fall of Icarus<p>MARIANNE MOORE(1887&ndash;1972)<p>The Past Is the Present<p>To a Steam Roller<p>The Fish<p>Poetry<p>A Graveyard<p>THE NEW NEGRO(1925)<p>Fog, by John Matheus<p>White Houses, by Claude McKay<p>The Black Finger, by Angelina Grimke<p>The Road, by Helene Johnson<p>COUNT&Eacute;E CULLEN(1903&ndash;1946)<p>Yet Do I Marvel<p>For a Lady I Know<p>Incident<p>From the Dark Tower<p>A Brown Girl Dead<p>Scottsboro, Too, Is Worth Its Song<p>JEAN TOOMER(1894&ndash;1967)<p>FROM Cane<p>Blood-Burning Moon<p>ZORA NEALE HURSTON(1891?&ndash;1960)<p>John Redding Goes to Sea<p>THOMAS WOLFE(1900&ndash;1938)<p>Only the Dead Know Brooklyn<p>F. SCOTT FITZGERALD(1896&ndash;1940)<p>Winter Dreams<p>ERNEST HEMINGWAY(1899&ndash;1961)<p>In Another Country<p>WILLIAM FAULKNER(1897&ndash;1962)<p>Barn Burning<p>LANGSTON HUGHES (1902&ndash;1967)<p>The Negro Speaks of Rivers<p>Aunt Sue&rsquo;s Stories<p>Question<p>The New Moon<p>Mexican Market Woman<p>I Too<p>Dream Boogie<p>Harlem<p>JOHN STEINBECK (1902&ndash;1968)<p>The Chrysanthemums<p>KATHERINE ANNE PORTER(1890&ndash;1980)<p>Mar&iacute;a Concepci&oacute;n<p>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945 to Present) <p>Reading the Historical Context <p>MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. (1929&ndash;1968)<p>I Have a Dream<p>JAMES R. MCDONOUGH (1946&ndash; )<p>FROM Platoon Leader<p>&ldquo;Just Like You and Me&rdquo;<p>BARACK OBAMA (1961&ndash; )<p>Inauguration Speech<p>Literature of the Twentieth Century<p>EUDORA WELTY (1909&ndash;2001)<p>Powerhouse<p>RICHARD WRIGHT(1908&ndash;1960)<p>The Man Who Was Almost a Man<p>ELIZABETH BISHOP(1911&ndash;1979)<p>A Miracle for Breakfast<p>The Armadillo<p>Brazil, January 1, 1502<p>One Art<p>ROBERT LOWELL (1917&ndash;1977)<p>Memories of West Street and Lepke<p>Skunk Hour<p>For the Union Dead<p>Will Not Come Back<p>ANNE SEXTON(1928&ndash;1974)<p>And One for My Dame<p>The Addict<p>Us<p>Rowing<p>SYLVIA PLATH(1932&ndash;1963)<p>Lady Lazarus<p>Daddy<p>W. S. MERWIN (1927&ndash; )<p>Grandfather in the Old Men&rsquo;s Home<p>The Drunk in the Furnace<p>Noah&rsquo;s Raven<p>The Dry Stone Mason<p>Fly<p>Strawberries<p>Direction<p>A. R. AMMONS (1926&ndash;2001)<p>Sight Seed<p>Motion Which Disestablishes Organizes Everything<p>The Damned<p>JAMES BALDWIN (1924&ndash;1987)<p>Sonny&rsquo;s Blues<p>FLANNERY O&rsquo;CONNOR(1925&ndash;1964)<p>Good Country People<p>BERNARD MALAMUD(1914&ndash;1986)<p>The Magic Barrel<p>SONIA SANCHEZ (1934&ndash; )<p>the final solution/<p>to blk/record/buyers<p>Womanhood<p>BLACK FIRE(1968)<p>Neon Diaspora, by David Henderson<p>For the Truth, by Edward Spriggs<p>&ldquo;Oh shit a riot!&rdquo; by Jacques Wakefield<p>JUNE JORDAN(1936&ndash;2002)<p>Poem About My Rights<p>Poem for Guatemala<p>A New Politics of Sexuality<p>MAXINE HONG KINGSTON (1940&ndash; )<p>No Name Woman<p>EDWARD ALBEE (1928&ndash; )<p>The Zoo Story<p>SAUL BELLOW(1915&ndash;2005)<p>A Silver Dish<p>N. SCOTT MOMADAY (1934&ndash; )<p>FROM The Way to Rainy Mountain<p>The Arrowmaker<p>JOYCE CAROL OATES (1938&ndash; )<p>How I Contemplated the World . .<p>JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON (1943&ndash; )<p>The Faithful<p>TIM O&rsquo;BRIEN (1946&ndash; )<p>FROM The Things They Carried<p>On the Rainy River 2113<p>AMY TAN (1952&ndash; )<p>FROM The Joy Luck Club<p>Half and Half<p>BOBBIE ANN MASON (1940&ndash; )<p>Shiloh<p>GLORIA NAYLOR (1950&ndash; )<p>FROM The Women of Brewster Place<p>Lucielia Louise Turner<p>LESLIE MARMON SILKO (1948&ndash; )<p>The Man to Send Rain Clouds<p>Coyote Holds a Full House in His Hand<p>GLORIA ANZALD&Uacute;A(1942&ndash;2004)<p>FROM Borderlands/La Frontera&#58; The New Mestiza<p>The Homeland, Aztl&aacute;n<p>LOUISE ERDRICH (1954&ndash; )<p>FROM Love Medicine<p>The Red Convertible (1974)<p>TINA HOWE (1937&ndash; )<p>Painting Churches<p>THOMAS PYNCHON (1937&ndash; )<p>Entropy<p>AUGUST WILSON(1945&ndash;2005)<p>Fences<p>SIMON ORTIZ (1941&ndash; )<p>A Designated National Park<p>Canyon de Chelly<p>Final Solution&#58; Jobs, Leaving<p>GEORGE SAUNDERS (1958&ndash; )<p>Offloading for Mrs. Schwartz<p>SHERMAN ALEXIE (1966&ndash; )<p>Class<p>Defending Walt Whitman<p>Reference Works, Bibliographies<p>Criticism, Literary and Cultural History
85The Heath Anthology of American Literature: Contemporary Period (1945 To The Present), Volume EPaul Lauter0<p><P>Paul Lauter is the Smith Professor of Literature at Trinity College. He has served as president of the American Studies Association and is a major figure in the revision of the American literary canon.<P>Dr. Bryer is an expert on F. Scott Fitzgerald and is president of the International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society. He was an editor of DEAR SCOTT, DEAREST ZELDA&#58; THE LOVE LETTERS OF F. SCOTT AND ZELDA FITZGERALD (Macmillan).<P>John Alberti teaches at Northern Kentucky University and has a Ph.D. in American literature from UCLA. His main area of research is multicultural American literature and culture.<P>Mary Pat Brady is the Director of Latino Studies at Cornell University. Her current work focuses on the emergence of the service economy and the corresponding transformation of Chicana and Latina culture.<P>Dr. Bryer is an expert on F. Scott Fitzgerald and is president of the International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society. He was an editor of DEAR SCOTT, DEAREST ZELDA&#58; THE LOVE LETTERS OF F. SCOTT AND ZELDA FITZGERALD (Macmillan).</p>Paul Lauter, Richard Yarborough, John Alberti, Mary Pat Brady, Jackson Bryerthe-heath-anthology-of-american-literaturepaul-lauter9780547201801054720180X$87.49PaperbackCengage LearningMarch 20096th EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies36126.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.50 (d)A best-selling anthology since its first edition, this premier survey of American literature has influenced the manner in which the American literary canon is taught in classrooms across the nation. In response to readers' requests, the editors of the <i>Heath Anthology</i> continue to develop and reinforce its greatest strengths: diverse reading selections and strong ancillaries. With the assistance of more than 200 contributing editors all specialists in particular eras and writers the editors have updated biographical and critical information, as well as added new works of interest to both instructors and students.<br> <br> <p>The Fourth Edition features writers and selections that highlight the divergent communities and diverse voices constituting the United States, both past and present. Volume 1 takes students from Native American oral literatures up to 1865, including Whitman and Dickinson. Volume 2 (which can be packaged with a free supplement of Whitman and Dickinson works) opens with African American folk tales and regional writers, and includes new sections on the Beat Movement and the Vietnam Conflict.</p> <ul> <li>Full-length texts continue to be integrated throughout the anthology, including <i>The Scarlet Letter</i> in Vol. 1 and <i>The Awakening</i> in Vol. 2.</li> <li>The textbook web site complements both volumes of the text through a searchable, multimedia timeline with literary, historical, and cultural information; author profile pages; links to other sites for further research; and an online version of the Instructor's Guide.</li> <li>The Southern literature section includes two short stories by William Faulkner, Dry September and Barn Burning, and an essay by H.L. Mencken, TheSahara of the Bozarts. Coverage of border literature includes the work of novelist María Amparo Ruíz de Burton. In addition, gay and lesbian writers such as Dorothy Allison, James Merrill, and Richard Rodriguez are featured throughout.</li> </ul><p><P>Unrivaled diversity and ease of use have made THE HEATH ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE&#58; VOLUME E&#58; CONTEMPORARY PERIOD (1945 TO THE PRESENT), 6th Edition a best-selling text since 1989, when the first edition was published. In presenting a more inclusive canon of American literature, THE HEATH ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE&#58; VOLUME E&#58; CONTEMPORARY PERIOD (1945 TO THE PRESENT), 6th Edition continues to balance the traditional, leading names in American literature with lesser-known writers and to build upon the anthology's other strengths&#58; its apparatus and its ancillaries. Available in five volumes for greater flexibility, the 6th Edition offers thematic clusters to stimulate classroom discussions and showcase the treatment of important topics across the genres.</p><P>Preface. CONTEMPORARY PERIOD&#58; 1945 TO THE PRESENT. The "American Century"&#58; From Victory to Vietnam. Ann Petry (1908-1997). The Witness. Theodore Roethke (1908-1963). Frau Bauman, Frau Schmidt, and Frau Schwartze. Root Cellar. Big Wind. from The Lost Son&#58; 1. The Flight; 4. The Return; 5. It was beginning winter. from Meditations of an Old Woman&#58; First Meditation; from Fourth Meditation. Elegy. My Papa's Waltz. Eudora Welty (1909-2002). The Wide Net. Charles Olson (1910-1970). The Kingfishers. For Sappho, Bac
86The Portable Harlem Renaissance ReaderDavid Lewis0David Lewis, David Levering Lewisthe-portable-harlem-renaissance-readerdavid-lewis97801401703680140170367$15.90PaperbackPenguin Group (USA)June 19951Places - Literary Anthologies, Regional American Anthologies, Peoples & Cultures - American Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies8165.18 (w) x 7.78 (h) x 1.47 (d)<p>Gathering a representative sampling of the New Negro Movement's most important figures, and providing substantial introductory essays, headnotes, and brief biographical notes, Lewis' volume—organized chronologically—includes the poetry and prose of Sterling Brown, Countee Cullen, W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, and others.</p> <p>From its beginnings in 1919, with soldiers returning from the Great War, to its sputtering end in 1934, with the Great Depression, the New Negro Movement in arts and letters proclaimed the experience of African American men and women. This magnificent volume features a wealth of fiction and nonfiction works by 45 writers from that exuberant era. </p><p>From its beginnings in 1919, with soldiers returning from the Great War, to its sputtering end in 1934, with the Great Depression, the New Negro Movement in arts and letters ...</p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>Editor Lewis is a noted author of several books, e.g., When Harlem Was in Vogue ( LJ 3/15/81) and, most recently, W.E.B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 ( LJ 8/93). This hefty tome features many significant essays, poems, and stories not readily available to all scholars that are drawn from African American journals of the period, including Opportunity, Crisis, and Fire! In his introduction, Lewis carefully explores tension within this arts and letters movement. The collected excerpts of writers like Cullen, Hurston, Hughes, McKay, DuBois, and Wright represent a balance between those Renaissance supporters and writers who ``saw the small cracks in the wall of racism that could, they anticipated, be widened through the production of exemplary racial images'' and those who ``saw art not as politics by other means--civil rights between covers or from a stage or an easel.'' This anthology will balance and enhance any modern American literature collection.-- Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia</p><p>Table of Contents Introduction Chronology Part I. Essays and Memoirs Returning Soldiers W. E. B. Du Bois The Migration of the Talented Tenth Carter G. Woodson Gift of the Black Tropics W. A. Domingo Africa for the Africans Marcus Garvey Liberty Hall Emancipation Day Speech On Marcus Garvey Mary White Ovington Black Manhattan James Weldon Johnson The New Negro Alain Locke Jazz at Home Joel A. Rogers Reflections on O'Neill's Plays Paul Robeson The Negro Digs Up His Past Arthur A. Schomburg The Task of Negro Womanhood Elise Johnson McDougald from The Big Sea Langston Hughes When the Negro Was in Vogue Harlem Literati Parties The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain The Negro-Art Hokum George S. Schuyler Criteria of Negro Art W. E. B. Du Bois Critiques of Carl Van Vechten's Nigger Heaven Du Bois J. W. Johnson The Caucasian Storms Harlem Rudolph Fisher Aaron Douglas Chats about the Harlem Renaissance Aaron Douglas Negro Art and America Albert C. Barnes The Negro Takes His Place in American Art Alain Locke The Negro Artist and Modern Art Romare Bearden from Dust Tracks on a Road Zora Neale Hurston from A Long Way from Home Claude McKay The Harlem Intelligentsia The New Negro in Paris La Bourgeoisie Noire E. Franklin Frazier With Langston Hughes in the USSR Louise Thompson Patterson Harlem Runs Wild Claude Mckay Blueprint for Negro Writing Richard Wright The Negro Renaissance and Its Significance Charles S. Johnson Part II. Poetry Song Gwendolyn Bennett Hatred The Day-Breakers Arna Bontemps Golgotha Is a Mountain Southern Road Sterling Brown Odyssey of Big Boy Frankie and Johnny Ma Rainey Long Gone Georgie Grimes Remembering Nat Turner The Young Voice Cries Mae Cowdery The Wayside Well Joseph S. Cotter For a Lady I Know Countee Cullen Incident Harlem Wine Yet Do I Marvel Heritage From the Dark Tower To a Brown Boy Tableau Saturday's Child Two Poets To France Nothing Endures Requiescam The Death Bed Waring Cuney La Vie C'est la Vie Jessie Redmon Fauset Dead Fires The Negro Speaks of Rivers Langston Hughes I, Too America The Weary Blues Jazzonia Mother to Son Negro Mulatto Elevator Boy Red Silk Stockings Ruby Brown Elderly Race Leaders Dream Variation Goodbye, Christ Advertisement for the Waldorf-Astoria Children of the Sun Fenton Johnson The Banjo Player Let Me Not Lose My Dream Georgia Douglas Johnson Old Black Men Black Woman The Heart of a Woman I Want to Die While You Love Me My Race Helene Johnson A Southern Road Sonnet to a Negro in Harlem Poem The White Witch James Weldon Johnson The Color Sergeant O Black and Unknown Bards Go Down Death The Creation If We Must Die Claude McKay Baptism The White House The Negro's Friend On a Primitive Canoe The Tropics in New York When Dawn Comes to the City The Desolate City The Harlem Dancer St. Isaac's Church, Petrograd Barcelona Lady, Lady Anne Spencer Song of the Son Jean Toomer Georgia Dusk The Blue Meridian Part III. Fiction from The Emperor Jones Eugene O'Neill from Cane Jean Toomer Karintha Fern Bona and Paul Birthright T. S. Stribling from There Is Confusion Jessie Redmon Fauset from Plum Bun from The Fire in the Flint Walter White Wedding Day Gwendolyn Bennett from Home to Harlem Claude McKay Snowstorm in Pittsburgh Spring in Harlem from Banjo Banjo's Ace of Spades from Banana Bottom from Quicksand Nella Larsen from Passing from The Closing Door Angelina Weld Grimke The Typewriter Dorothy West from The Dark Princess W. E. B. Du Bois from The Walls of Jericho Rudolph Fisher from Tropic Death Eric Walrond The Wharf Rats The Yellow One Smoke, Lilies and Jade Richard Bruce Nugent Luani of the Jungles Langston Hughes from Not Without Laughter Thursday Afternoon from The Ways of White Folks Father and Son The Blues I'm Playing Cordelia the Crude Wallace Thurman Harlem: A Forum of Negro Life from The Blacker the Berry...<br> from Infants of the Spring from Black No More George Schuyler from God Sends Sunday Arna Bontemps from Black Thunder from One Way to Heaven Countee Cullen Drenched in Light Zora Neale Hurston Color Struck Jonah's Gourd Vine from Mule-Bone Zora Neale Hurston Langston Hughes Biographical Notes Acknowledgments</p><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>Editor Lewis is a noted author of several books, e.g., When Harlem Was in Vogue ( LJ 3/15/81) and, most recently, W.E.B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 ( LJ 8/93). This hefty tome features many significant essays, poems, and stories not readily available to all scholars that are drawn from African American journals of the period, including Opportunity, Crisis, and Fire! In his introduction, Lewis carefully explores tension within this arts and letters movement. The collected excerpts of writers like Cullen, Hurston, Hughes, McKay, DuBois, and Wright represent a balance between those Renaissance supporters and writers who ``saw the small cracks in the wall of racism that could, they anticipated, be widened through the production of exemplary racial images'' and those who ``saw art not as politics by other means--civil rights between covers or from a stage or an easel.'' This anthology will balance and enhance any modern American literature collection.-- Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia </article>
87American Short StoriesBert Hitchcock0Bert Hitchcockamerican-short-storiesbert-hitchcock97803214848950321484894$76.05HardcoverLongmanOctober 20078th EditionShort Story Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies7605.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)<p><b>American short stories capture America’s past and present in a unique way. Now you have an opportunity to immerse yourself in the more than two hundred year history of the American short story by taking this course and reading the new eighth edition of <i>American Short Stories</i>. While retaining its historical thrust and chronological organization, the new eighth edition features more contemporary stories and gives increased attention to the social and cultural contexts in which the short fiction of the United States has unfolded.</b></p> <p>WHAT YOU’LL FIND IN THIS EDITION</p> <ul> <li>An enriched, powerful selection of stories from classic and contemporary authors. Of the sixty selected stories making up this anthology, sixteen are new to the eighth edition and nine are new authors.</li> <li>A new selection of contemporary stories is given an historical section of their own.</li> <li>New and improved Suggestions for Discussion and Writing features encourage meaningful class discussion and stimulate writing.</li> <li>Increased representation of cultural diversity with attention to race, ethnicity, gender, region, and individual social and cultural concerns.</li> <li>Enhanced Introductions and Headnotes make use of an author’s own words to place the author in relation to his or her time, to other writers, and to American literary history.</li> </ul><p><P>American Short Stories, 8/e is a streamlined anthology that includes "classic" works and contemporary stories that are organized chronologically. Of the sixty selected stories making up this anthology, sixteen are new to the eighth edition and nine of the authors are new. Increased attention is given to the social and cultural contexts in which the short fiction of the United States unfolded. The stories represent a wide range of themes and techniques, forms and types, motifs, tones, and issues.</p><table><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Story of the Captain's Wife, and an Aged Woman</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Peter Rugg, The Missing Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">28</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Legend of Sleepy Hollow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">49</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Horse-Swap</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">69</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Young Goodman Brown</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">75</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Black Cat</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">85</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Big Bear of Arkansas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">93</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bartleby, the Scrivener</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">103</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">129</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Outcasts of Poker Flat</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">135</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">"Europe"</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">143</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A White Heron</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">157</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Passing of Grandison</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">192</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Storm</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">200</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A New England Nun</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">205</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Caballero's Way</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">215</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Other Two</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">224</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">239</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Paul's Case</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">248</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">To Build a Fire</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">263</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Death in the Woods</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">275</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Jury of Her Peers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">285</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Silent Snow, Secret Snow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">313</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Grave</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">326</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Gilded Six-Bits</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">331</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Memorial to the Slain</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">341</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Secret Life of Walter Mitty</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">349</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Blood-Burning Moon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">354</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Babylon Revisited</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">361</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Barn Burning</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">377</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In Another Country</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">391</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Chrysanthemums</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">396</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Thank You, Ma'm</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">405</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Big Black Good Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">422</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Petrified Man</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">433</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Man in the House</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">444</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Swimmer</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">453</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Jewbird</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">462</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Samuel</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">469</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Children on Their Birthdays</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">473</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Good Country People</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">486</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The School</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">501</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A & P</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">505</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Sky Is Gray</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">511</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">532</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Girl's Story</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">545</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">What He Was Like</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">566</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mazes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">570</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Boxes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">574</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Wrath-bearing Tree</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">584</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Shiloh</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">591</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Strong Horse Tea</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">601</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Hunters in the Snow</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">607</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fairy Tale</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">620</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Things They Carried</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">627</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Gryphon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">640</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cheers</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">652</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fleur</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">655</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mericans</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">665</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the American Society</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">667</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Acknowledgments</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">681</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Index</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">685</TD></table>
88Great Love PoemsShane Weller0Shane Wellergreat-love-poemsshane-weller97804862728490486272842$1.99PaperbackDover PublicationsOctober 1992Special ValuePoetry, American Literature Anthologies, Anthologies, General & Miscellaneous Poetry, English, Irish, & Scottish Poetry1285.12 (w) x 8.34 (h) x 0.32 (d)Treasury of over 150 familiar poems by English and American poets, including a selection of Shakespeare's sonnets, John Donne's "The Ecstasy," William Blake's "The Garden of Love," as well as works by W. B. Yeats, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, John Keats, John Milton, Robert Frost, and many more.&nbsp;Includes 2 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative.<br><p><p>Over 150 familiar works by English and American poets&#58; John Donne's "The Ecstasy," William Blake's "The Garden of Love," as well as poems by Shakespeare, Milton, Keats, Whitman,&#160;Dickinson, many more.<p></p>
89The Harper American Literature, Single Volume EditionDonald McQuade0Donald McQuade, Justin Kaplan, Martha Bantathe-harper-american-literature-single-volume-editiondonald-mcquade97803210126920321012690$89.47HardcoverLongmanDecember 19983rd EditionAmerican Literature Anthologies28676.38 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 2.45 (d)A richly diverse gathering of new and familiar voices, on subjects new and old, The Harper Single Volume American Literature takes the reader on a journey through America's literary past and ever-projecting future. Eleven cultural portfolios provide windows into historic moments in our literary past and present; superbly informative and readable period introductions further deepen the reader's understanding of the America from which this literature evolved. Five great plays, an unprecedented wealth of complete works, approximately one hundred carefully chosen black and white images - a collection both deeper and broader than other single volume anthologies. The Harper Single Volume American Literature, Third Edition has it all.<p>A richly diverse gathering of new and familiar voices, on subjects new and old, The Harper Single Volume American Literature takes the reader on a journey through America's literary past and ever-projecting future. Eleven cultural portfolios provide windows into historic moments in our literary past and present; superbly informative and readable period introductions further deepen the reader's understanding of the America from which this literature evolved. Five great plays, an unprecedented wealth of complete works, approximately one hundred carefully chosen black and white images - a collection both deeper and broader than other single volume anthologies. The Harper Single Volume American Literature, Third Edition has it all.</p><P><br> CONTENTS The Literature of the New World. Introduction. The Discoveries of America. Native American Literature&lt;58&gt; First Encounters. How the New World Became America. A Literature of Experience. America and the Pastoral Ideal. Survival and Rebirth. Toward a Pluralistic Culture. Native American Narratives. A Bering Strait Eskimo Creation Account. The Time When There Were No People on the Earth Plain. Seneca Account. The Story Telling Stone. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The European Conquest of America. The Saga of the Greenlanders, Anonymous. Michele de Cuneo&rsquo;s Letter on Columbus&rsquo;s Second Voyage, Michele de Cuneo. Broken Spears&lt;58&gt; The Aztec Account of Conquest of Mexico, Anonymous. @MAHEADS = The Conquest of New Spain, Bernal D&iacute;az. The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel, Anonymous. The Conquest of New Spain, Bernal D&iacute;az. Letter to the King, Giovanni da Verrazano. The Narrative of the Expedition of Coronado, Pedro de Casteneda. A Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia, Thomas Hariot. The Journal of the First Voyage, October 12, 1492. Michele de Cuneo&rsquo;s Letter on the Second Voyage, October 28, 1495. Columbus&rsquo;s Letter to the Sovereigns on the Third Voyage, October 18, 1498. The Narrative of N&uacute;&ntilde;ez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar N&uacute;&ntilde;ez Cabeza de Vaca. Letter to Captain John Smith, Powhatan. The Generall Historie of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles, Book III, Chapter II &lt;91&gt;Captain Smith&rsquo;s Captivity&lt;93&gt;, Captain John Smith. From a Description of New England &lt;91&gt;Growing Rich in the New World&lt;93&gt;. The Literature of Colonial America. Introduction. A &ldquo;Cittyupon a Hill&lt;58&gt;&rdquo; - New England. The Religious Background. The Voyage; The Landfall. Puritan Beliefs. Puritan Literature. Native Americans. Government Obedience. Women. A &ldquo;Vale of Plenty&rdquo; - The South. Southern Intellectual Life. Toward the Revolution&lt;58&gt; the 18th Century. The Enlightenment. Jonathan Edwards and the Great Awakening. Settlers and Skirmishes. Of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford. Related Voices. The Life of William Bradford, Esq, Cotton Mather. A Model of Christian Charity, John Winthrop. The Prologue, Anne Bradstreet. The Author to Her Book. Before the Birth of One of Her Children. To My Dear and Loving Husband. In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet. Here Follows Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House. To My Dear Children. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The Witchcraft Trials. Witch Hunting &amp; Witch Trials, C. L&rsquo;Estrange Ewen. Magnelia Christi Americana, Cotton Mather. The Diary of Samuel Sewall, Samuel Sewall. Anne Hutchinson&rsquo;s Trial. From The Antinomian Controversy (David D. Hall, ed.). From John Winthrop&rsquo;s Journal. A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Mary Rowlandson. Related Voices. Hanna Dustan&rsquo;s Narrative, Cotton Mather. @AHEADS = Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The Ways of the Native Americans. Book III&lt;58&gt; Of the Indians, Their Religion, Laws, and Customs, in War and Peace, Robert Beverly. A Key Into the Language of America, Roger Williams. History of the Dividing Line, William Byrd. Notes on the State of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson. Preparatory Meditations, Edward Taylor. William Byrd&lt;58&gt; His Secret Diary for the Years 1709-1712, William Byrd. From Personal Narrative, Jonathan Edwards. From Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. The Autobiography, Benjamin Franklin. Poor Richard Improved, 1758. From Information to Those Who Would Remove to America. Native Americans and the Myth of the Noble Savage. From &ldquo;Of Coaches&rdquo;, Michel de Montaigne. Of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford. From Letter to Sir William Ashurst (May 3, 1700), Samuel Sewall. From Letter (1732), General Jeffrey Amherst. From Discourse upon the Origin and Foundation of the Inequality Among Mankind, Jean-Jacques Rousseau. From A Narrative of the Late Massacres in Lancaster County, Benjamin Franklin. From Travels Round the World in the Years 1767-1771, Pierre Marie Fran&ccedil;ois de Pages. The Unseen Helpers, Seneca and Cherokee Oral History. Hemp-Carrier. A Sermon Preached at the Execution of Moses Paul, An Indian Samson Occom. On the Death of the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield, 1770, Phillis Wheatley. On Being Brought from Africa to America. To S. M. a Young African Painter, on Seeing His Works. To His Excellency General Washington. Related Voices. Thomas Jefferson. Notes on the State of Virginia, 1787. The Literature of the New Republic, 1776-1836. Introduction. The Literature of Persuasion. Making Thirteen Clocks Tick Together. Cultivating New Meanings. The Quest for Literary Independence. Westward Course of Empire. Printing and the Reading Public. Frontiers of Literature. The Prospects of an American Literature. The Makings of American Literature. European Models and the American Landscape. The Declaration of Independence as Adopted by Congress, Thomas Jefferson. Notes on the State of Virginia. Letter to John Adams&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;March 31, 1776&lt;58&gt; The Passion for Liberty&lt;93&gt;, Abigail Adams. Related Voices. From An Address to the Legislature of New York Proposing a Plan for Improving Female Education (1819), Emma Willard. Common Sense, Thomas Paine. The American Crisis. Letters from an American Farmer, St. Jean de Cr&egrave;vecoeur. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Oloudah Equiano, Oloudah Equiano (Gustavus Vassa). Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; Slavery, Freedom, and Identity. The Selling of Joseph&lt;58&gt; A Memorial, Samuel Sewall. An Address to the Public; from the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, Benjamin Franklin. Notes on the State of Virginia&lt;58&gt; On the Traits of Blacks, Thomas Jefferson. Black Petitions for Freedom. The American Museum; or, Repository of Ancient and Modern Fugitive Pieces, Prose and Poetical (May 1789), Anonymous. From Letter IX&lt;58&gt; Charleston Slave, St. Jean de Cr&egrave;vecoeur. No. 10 &lt;91&gt;James Madison&lt;93&gt; The Federalist. On the Emigration to America and Peopling the Western Country, Philip Freneau. The Wild Honey Suckle. The Indian Burying Ground. On Mr. Paine&rsquo;s Rights of Man. Native Americans and &ldquo;Westward the Course of Empire&rdquo;. &ldquo;1786&rdquo;, Thomas Jefferson. July 13, 1787, Northwest Ordinance. &ldquo;Message to Congress (December 6, 1830)&rdquo;, President Andrew Jackson. &ldquo;Indian Wars of the West (1833), Timothy Flint. From Letter to President Martin Van Buren on the removal of the Cherokee Indians (April 23, 1838), Ralph Waldo Emerson. From Review of Francis Parkman&rsquo;s The California and Oregon Trail 1849), Herman Melville. A Son of the Forest, William Apess. The Sketch Book, Washington Irving. Rip Van Winkle. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; Asserting a National Language and Literature. Dissertations on the English Language (1789), Noah Webster. Fable from American Spelling Book. Letters from an American Farmer, St. Jean de Cr&egrave;vecoeur. From American Language and Literature (1815), Walter Channing. Salmagundi, Second Series. Saturday, August 19, 1820, James Kirke Paulding. Preface to The Leather-stocking Tales, James Fenimore Cooper. The Deerslayer. The Pioneers. The Prairie. Appeal to the Christian Women of the South, Sarah and Angelina Grimk&egrave;. Related Voices. Sojourner Truth &lt;91&gt;As Reported in The Anti-Slavery Bugle&lt;93&gt;. Thanatopsis, William Cullen Bryant. To a Waterfowl. The Prairies. The Literature of the American Renaissance, 1836-1865. @AHEADS = Introduction. &ldquo;Who Reads American Books?&rdquo; A Revolution in Consciousness. &ldquo;Incomparable Materials.&rdquo; An Improving Spirit. &ldquo;Self-made or Never Made.&rdquo; Gold Rush. Railroad Iron. Impending Crisis. &ldquo;Swallow Barn&rdquo;, John Pendleton Kennedy. Ralph Waldo Emerson. Related Voices. &ldquo;The Supremacy of Mind over Matter&rdquo;, George Ripley. Nature. The American Scholar. Related Voices. Air Intllectual declaration of Independence Thomas Carlyle, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. An Address. Self-Reliance. The Poet. Experience. Concord Hymn. The Rhodora. Each and All. Hamatreya. Days. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; Nature&rsquo;s Nation. From Essay on American Scenery, Thomas Cole. From Nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson. From Circles. From The Knickerbocker, James Brooks. The Maine Woods, Henry David Thoreau. From The Pioneers, James Fenimore Cooper. Walden, Henry David Thoreau. Resistance to Civil Government. American Literature, Margaret Fuller. Ligeia, Edgar Allan Poe. The Fall of the House of Usher. The Purloined Letter. The Cask of Amontillado. The Philosophy of Composition. Sonnet - To Science. To Helen. The Raven. Ulalume - A Ballad. Annabel Lee. The Bells. My Kinsman, Major Molineux, Nathaniel Hawthorne. Young Goodman Brown. Wakefield. The Maypole of Merry Mount. The Minister&rsquo;s Black Veil. Rappacini&rsquo;s Daughter. Bartleby, The Scrivener&lt;58&gt; A Tale of Wall Street, Herman Melville. The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids. Billy Budd, Sailor. Battle Pieces and Aspects of the War. Timoleon, Etc. Massachusetts to Virginia, John Greenleaf Whittier. Ichabod. Skipper Ireson&rsquo;s Ride. Telling the Bees. Uncle Tom&rsquo;s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe. Headnote, Harriet Ann Jacobs. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. The Big Bear of Arkansas, Thomas Bangs Thorpe. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, Frederick Douglass. A Diary from Dixie, Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut. Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln. Second Inaugural Address. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott. Rebecca Harding Davis. Life in the Iron Mills. Related Voices. From Iron Interests of Wheeling, A. W. Campbell. From The Gospel of Wealth, Andrew Carnegie. From Testimony Before the United States Senate Committee on Labor and Education, 1883, John Roach. From Lectures to Young Men, Henry Ward Beecher. Leaves of Grass &lt;91&gt;1891-1892&lt;93&gt;Preface to the 1855 Edition, Walt Whitman. Inscriptions. One&rsquo;s Self I Sing. I Hear America Singing. Song of Myself. Children of Adam. I Sing the Body Electric. Once I Pass&rsquo;d Through a Populous City. Facing West from California&rsquo;s Shores. As Adam Early in the Morning. Calamus. I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing. Here the Frailest Leaves of Me. Crossing Brooklyn Ferry. Sea Drift. Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking. As I Ebbed With the Ocean of Life. By the Roadside. When I Heard the Learn&rsquo;d Astronomer. Drum-Taps. Cavalry Crossing a Ford. A March in the Ranks Hard-Prest, and the Road Unknown. A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim. The Wound-Dresser. Reconciliation. Memories of President Lincoln. When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom&rsquo;d. Autumn Rivulets. There Was a Child Went Forth. Passage to India. The Sleepers. Whispers of Heavenly Death. A Noiseless Patient Spider. 67&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Success is counted sweetest&lt;93&gt;, Emily Dickinson. 185&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;&ldquo;Faith&rdquo; is a Fine Invention&lt;93&gt;. 214&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Taste a Liquor Never Brewed-&lt;93&gt;. 216&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Safe in the Alabaster Chambers-&lt;93&gt;. 241&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Like a Look of Agony&lt;93&gt;. 258&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;There&rsquo;s a Certain Slant of Light&lt;93&gt;. 280&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I felt a Funeral, in My Brain&lt;93&gt;. 303&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;The Soul Selects her own Society-&lt;93&gt;. 324&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church-&lt;93&gt;. 338&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Know that He Exists&lt;93&gt;. 341&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;After Great Pain, a Formal Feeling Comes-&lt;93&gt;. 401&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;What Soft-Cherubic Creatures-&lt;93&gt;. 435&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Much Madness is Divinest Sense-&lt;93&gt;. 441&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;This is My Letter to the World&lt;93&gt;. 448&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;This was a Poet - It is That&lt;93&gt;. 449&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Died for Beauty - But was Scarce&lt;93&gt;. 465&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Heard a Fly Buzz - When I Died-&lt;93&gt;. 501&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;This World is not Conclusion&lt;93&gt;. 536&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;The Hearts asks Pleasure - First-&lt;93&gt;. 585&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Like to See it Lap the Miles-&lt;93&gt;. 632&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;The Brain - is Wider Than the Sky-&lt;93&gt;. 640&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Cannot Live with You-&lt;93&gt;. 650&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Pain - Has an Element of Blank-&lt;93&gt;. 657&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Dwell in Possibility-&lt;93&gt;. 709&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Publication - is the Auction&lt;93&gt;. 712&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Because I Could Not Stop for Death-&lt;93&gt;. 721&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Behind Me - Dips Eternity-&lt;93&gt;. 754&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;My Life had Stood - A Loaded Gun-&lt;93&gt;. 764&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Presentiment - is That Long Shadow - on the Lawn&lt;93&gt;. 986&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;A Narrow Fellow in the Grass&lt;93&gt;. 1052&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;I Never Saw a Moor-&lt;93&gt;. 1071&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Perception of an Object Costs&lt;93&gt;. 1078&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;The Bustle in a House&lt;93&gt;. 1125&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Oh Sumptuous Moment&lt;93&gt;. 1129&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Tell All the Truth But Tell it Slant-&lt;93&gt;. 1463&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;A Route of Evanescence&lt;93&gt;. 1540&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;As Imperceptibly as Grief&lt;93&gt;. 1545&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;The Bible is an Antique Volume-&lt;93&gt;. 1624&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Apparently with No Surprise&lt;93&gt;. 1651&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;A Word made Flesh is Seldom&lt;93&gt;. 1670&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;In Winter in My Room&lt;93&gt;. 1732&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;My Life Closed Twice Before its Close-&lt;93&gt;. 1755&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;To Make a Prairie it Takes a Clover and One Bee&lt;93&gt;. 1760&lt;58&gt; &lt;91&gt;Elysium is as Far as To&lt;93&gt;. Excerpts from the Letters of Emily Dickinson. The Literature of an Expanding Nation, 1865-1912. Introduction. The Paradox of Peace. Opportunism and Corruption. Exposure and Reform. The Old Order Gives Way. The Writer&rsquo;s Profession. Getting at &ldquo;The Real.&rdquo; Writing About Lives on the Margin. The Writer&rsquo;s Challenge. What is an &ldquo;American&rdquo;? Emerging Feminine Identities. New Words, New Definitions. A Nation Connected. A New Reading Public. Thinking Hard and Writing Well. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The New Immigrants. The New Colossus, Emma Lazarus. The American Scene, Henry James. The Rise of David Levinsky, Abraham Cahan. Angel Island, Anonymous. The Biography of a Chinaman, Lee Chew. From Bread Givers, Anzia Yezierska. Native American Assimilation and a Reemerging Tradition. From The Conspiracy of Pontiac (1851), Francis Parkman. From Message to Congress (1867), President Andrew Johnson. From United States v. Lucero (1869) U.S. Supreme Court. From letter to the city officials at Santa Fe, New Mexico (1883), Walt Whitman. From the North American Review (April 1902), Hamlin Garland. From The Bear (1942), William Faulkner. Seattle (1786-1866) Our People are Ebbing Away Like a Rapidly Receding Tide. Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins (1844-1891) Life Among the Piutes. The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, Mark Twain. Fenimore Cooper&rsquo;s Literary Offenses. Corn-Pone Opinions. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. From The American Short Story, William Dean Howells. Editha. The Education of Henry Adams, Henry Adams. The Dynamo and the Virgin (1900). From The Art of Fiction, Henry James. From Preface to The American. From Hawthorne. Daisy Miller. The Diary of Alice James, Alice James. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Ambrose Bierce. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; Oral Traditions and Turn-of-the-Century Literature. The Journal of American Folklore, Franz Boas, et al. Sam Lawson&rsquo;s Oldtown Fireside Stories, Harriet Beecher Stowe. My Opinions and Betsey Bobbet&rsquo;s, Marietta Holley (Josiah Allen&rsquo;s Wife). Eastern European Jewish Oral Tradition. Yiddish Proverbs, Translated by Isadore Goldstick. How to Tell a Story, Mark Twain. The Virginian, Owen Wister. From Sut Lovingood&lt;58&gt; Yarns Spun by a Nat&rsquo;ral Born Durn&rsquo;d Fool, George Washington Harris. The Rabbit and the Tar Wolf, Cherokee Oral Tradition. Uncle Remus&lt;58&gt; His Songs and His Sayings, Joel Chandler Harris. Mules and Men, Zora Neale Hurston. Steal Away to Jesus, African American Spirituals. Go Down, Moses. The Souls of Black Folk, W. E. B. Dubois. Ballads and World Songs, John Henry. Cotton Mill Colic. Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell. A White Heron, Sarah Orne Jewett. The Awakening, Kate Chopin. The Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Why I Wrote &ldquo;The Yellow Wallpaper&rdquo;. Related Voices. The Great Modern American Stories, William Dean Howells. The Other Two, Edith Wharton. Up from Slavery, Booker T. Washington. The Souls of Black Folks, W. E. B. Dubois. Frederick Douglass, Paul Laurence Dunbar. We Wear the Mask. Sympathy. Richard Cory, Edward Arlington Robinson. Miniver Cheevy. Eros Turannos. Mr. Flood&rsquo;s Party. The Open Boat, Stephen Crane. The Black Riders and Other Lines. He Got a Ride, Theodore Dreiser. To Build a Fire, Jack London. Impressions of an Indian Childhood, Zitkala S&acute;a (Gertrude Simmons Bonnin). School Days. The Literature of a New Century, 1912-1945. Introduction. New World&lt;58&gt; New Writers. The Great War. The Age of Business and Frolic. Racism and Sexism. An Alienated Generation. The Making of American Modernists. From the Crash to the New Deal. Social Criticism and Marxism. The Second World War. The Dawn of Postmodernism. Neighbor Rosicky, Willa Cather. The Mending Wall, Robert Frost. The Road Not Taken. The Oven Bird. After Apple-Picking. Birches. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. Once by the Pacific. Desert Places. Design. The Most of It. Directive. Trifles, Susan Keating Glaspell. The Egg, Sherwood Anderson. Chicago, Carl Sandburg. Fog. Cool Tombs. Sunday Morning, Wallace Stevens. Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird. Anecdote of the Jar. The Emperor of Ice-Cream. The Idea of Order at Key West. The Poem that Took the Place of a Mountain. America and I, Anzia Yezierska. Queen Anne&rsquo;s Lace, William Carlos Williams. Spring and All. The Red Wheelbarrow. This is Just to Say. The Yachts. The River-Merchant&rsquo;s Wife&lt;58&gt; A Letter, Ezra Pound. A Pact. In a Station in the Metro. From Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (Life and Contacts). From The Cantos. Sea Rose, H. D. (Hilda Doolittle). Oread. Helen. Boats in a Fog, Robinson Jeffers. Hurt Hawks. Poetry, Marianne Moore. The Fish. A Grave. The Monkeys. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, T. S. Eliot. Gerontion. The Waste Land. The Hollow Men. From Tradition and the Individual Talent. The Emperor Jones, Eugene O&rsquo;Neill. The Jilting of Granny Weatherall, Katherine Anne Porter. The Gilded Six-Bits, Zora Neale Hurston. Spunk. &lt;91&gt;Euclid Alone has Looked on Beauty Bare&lt;93&gt;, Edna St. Vincent Millay. &lt;91&gt;Love is Not All; It is Not Meat nor Drink&lt;93&gt;. Cane, Jean Toomer. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The Harlem Renaissance. From The New Negro&lt;58&gt; An Interpretation, Alain Locke. God&rsquo;s Trombones, James Weldon Johnson. From The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, Langston Hughes. The Heart of a Woman, Georgia Douglas Johnson. Smothered Fires. Motherhood. Sweat, Zora Neale Hurston. Ma Rainey, Sterling A. Brown. Slim in Hell. Remembering Nat Turner. Yet Do I Marvel, Countee Cullen. Incident. Heritage. Sonnet to a Negro in Harlem, Helene Johnson. What Do I Care for Morning. Remember Not. The Big Sea, Langston Hughes. &lt;91&gt;in Just-&lt;93&gt;, E. E. Cummings. &lt;91&gt;the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls&lt;93&gt;. &lt;91&gt;next to god of course america i&lt;93&gt;. &lt;91&gt;my sweet old etcetera&lt;93&gt;. &lt;91&gt;i sing of Olaf glad and big&lt;93&gt;. &lt;91&gt;anyone lived in a pretty how town&lt;93&gt;. &lt;91&gt;what a proud dreamhorse&lt;93&gt;. Winter Dreams, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Spotted Horses, William Faulkner. That Evening Sun. Barn Burning. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; The Southern Renaissance. From The Mind of the South, W. J. Cash. Look Homeward, Angel, Thomas Wolfe. From The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner. Two Writers&rsquo; Beginnings. From Black Boy&lt;58&gt; A Record of Childhood and Youth, Richard Wright. From American Hunger. From A Sweet Devouring, Eudora Welty. Three Poets. Bells for John Whiteside&rsquo;s Daughter, John Crowe Ransom. Piazza Piece. The Equilibrists. Ode to the Confederate Dead, Allen Tate. Bearded Oaks, Robert Penn Warren. Two Collaborations. From You Have Seen Their Faces, Erskine Caldwell and Margaret Bourke-White. From Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, James Agee and Walker Evans. Black Tambourine, Hart Crane. Chaplinesque. At Melville&rsquo;s Tomb. Voyages I, II, III. The Bridge (selection). Soldier&rsquo;s Home, Ernest Hemingway. The Negro Speaks of Rivers, Langston Hughes. The Weary Blues. I, Too. Dream Boogie. Theme for English B. Long Black Song, Richard Wright. Why I Live at the P.O. , Eudora Welty. The Literature Since Midcentury, 1945- the Present. Introduction. Contemporary Literature. The First Post war Generation. The Second Post war Generation and Vietnam. Cuttings, Theodore Roethke. Cuttings (later). My Papa&rsquo;s Waltz. The Lost Son. Elegy for Jane. The Waking. The Fish, Elizabeth Bishop. At the Fishhouses. Questions of Travel. Sestina. In the Waiting Room. One Art. The Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams. Homage to the Empress of the Blues, Robert Hayden. Those Winter Sundays. A Letter from Phillis Wheatley. Related Voices. A Letter to Obour Tanner, Phillis Wheatley. I Stand Here Ironing, Tillie Olsen. The Battle Royal, Ralph Ellison. The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner, Randall Jarrell. The Woman at the Washington Zoo. Memories of West Street and Lepke, Robert Lowell. Skunk Hour. For the Union Dead. History. For John Berryman. Epilogue. From A Street in Bronzeville, Gwendolyn Brooks. Negro Hero. A Bronzeville Mother Loiters in Mississippi.@AHEADS = Meanwhile, a Mississippi Mother Burns Bacon. The Last Quatrain of the Ballad of Emmet Till. The Blackstone Rangers. Young Afrikans@MAHEADS = Love Calls Us to the Things of This World, Richard Wilbur. Playboy. The Writer. Cottage Street, 1953. Pleasures, Denise Levertov. The Ache of Marriage. O Taste and See. Where Is the Angel? From The Armies of the Night, Norman Mailer. Sonny&rsquo;s Blues, James Baldwin. Letter to My Nephew on the One-Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation. A Good Man Is Hard to Find, Flannery O&rsquo;Connor. From Howl, Allen Ginsburg. A Supermarket in California. America. The Painter, John Ashbery. These Lacustrine Cities. Soonest Mended. Syringa. Landscapeople. Lament for My Brother on a Hayrake, James Wright. A Note Left in Jimmy Leonard&rsquo;s Shack. At the Executed Murderer&rsquo;s Grave. Autumn Begins in Martin&rsquo;s Ferry, Ohio. Lightning Bugs Asleep in the Afternoon. Coming Home, Philip Levine. They Feed the Lion. You Can have It. Her Kind, Anne Sexton. The Truth the Dead Know. Self in 1958. For My Lover, Returning to His Wife. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Letter from a Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King, Jr. Living in Sin, Adrienne Rich. The Knight. Necessities of Life. &ldquo;I Am in Danger - Sir -.&rdquo; Trying to Talk with a Man. Diving into the Wreck. Translations. The Ninth Symphony of Beethoven Understood at Last as a Sexual Message. Playing in the Dark, Toni Morrison. Separating, John Updike. Black Rook in Rainy Weather, Sylvia Plath. Daddy. Medusa. Ariel. Lady Lazarus. Death &lt;38&gt; Co. Fever 1030. The Conversion of the Jews, Philip Roth. Black Mother Woman, Audre Lorde. Equinox. Walking Our Boundaries. Afterimages. House Made of Dawn, N. Scott Momaday. From The Priest of the Sun. Ghosts, Mary Oliver. Owls. The Sun. When Death Comes. Thorow, Susan Howe. Dear John, Dear Coltrane, Michael S. Harper. American History. Nightmare Begins Responsibility. Peace on Earth. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? Joyce Carol Oates. What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Raymond Carver. Shiloh, Bobbie Ann Mason. The Woman Warrior; No Name Woman, Maxine Hong Kingston. Everyday Use, Alice Walker. The Things They Carried, Tim O&rsquo;Brien. Storyteller, Leslie Marmon Silko. Lullaby. The Geese, Jorie Graham. Over and Over Stitch. Mind. My Garden, My Daylight. Banneker, Rita Dove. Parsley. Roast Possum. Dusting. Mississippi. In a Neutral City. The Kind of Light That Shines on Texas, Reginald McKnight. Lost on September Trail, 1967, Alberto Rios. Mi Abuelo. Nani. The Good Lunch of Oceans. Barbie-Q, Sandra Cisneros. Lulu&rsquo;s Boys, Louise Erdrich. Lost Sister, Cathy Song. Youngest Daughter. The White Porch. Beauty and Sadness. Mona in the Promised Land, Gish Jen. Angels in America&lt;58&gt; Millennium Approaches, Tony Kushner. Eating Together, Li-Young Lee. Persimmons. The City in Which I Love You. Cultural Portfolio&lt;58&gt; Who Is an American Writer? Terra Incognita, Vladimir Nabokov. Escape from Civilization, Isaac Bashevis Singer. To Robinson Jeffers, Czeslaw Milosz. To the Western World, Louis (Aston Marantz) Simpson. American Poetry. A Far Cry From Africa, Derek Walcott. Preparing for Exile. Old New England. Sarita, Maria Irene Fornes. Happiness, Bharati Mukherjee. Letters from the Ming Dynasty, Joseph Brodsky. May 24, 1980, Girl, Jamaica Kincaid. Letters from the Ming Dynasty, Joseph Brodsky. May 24, 1980, Girl, Jamaica Kincaid.
90The Latino Reader: An American Literary Tradition from 1542 to the PresentMargarite Fernandez Olmos0<p>HAROLD AUGENBRAUM is the executive director of the National BookFoundation. He lives in the Bronx, New York.</p>Margarite Fernandez Olmos (Editor), Harold Augenbraumthe-latino-readermargarite-fernandez-olmos97803957652890395765285$13.98PaperbackHoughton Mifflin HarcourtMarch 1997NonePeoples & Cultures - American Anthologies, Hispanic & Latin American Literature Anthologies, Literature Anthologies - General & Miscellaneous5285.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.50 (d)<p>The Latino Reader is the first anthology to present the full history of this important American literary tradition, from the mid-sixteenth century to the present day. Selections include works of history, memoirs, letters, and essays, as well as fiction, poetry, and drama. Adding to the importance of the volume are several selections from rare and little-known texts that have been translated into English for the first time.</p><p><p>The Latino Reader is the first anthology to present the full history of this important American literary tradition, from the mid-sixteenth century to the present day. Selections include works of history, memoirs, letters, and essays, as well as fiction, poetry, and drama. Adding to the importance of the volume are several selections from rare and little-known texts that have been translated into English for the first time.<p></p><h3>Library Journal</h3><p>The compilers, scholars who have studied and written about the Latino population in the United States, have put together an anthology of literary works dealing with the panorama of Latino writings in the United States. The selections range widely, from Cabeza de Vaca's 1542 description of the South to recent excerpts from Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Mexican American authors. The collection is primarily literary though it does include some historical, autobiographical, and essay excerpts. It offers what would be expected in this type of anthology, with an occasional surprise, such as an excerpt from John Rechy's novel City of Night. Readers will be primarily college and university students, but this will also be of value to smaller public libraries with limited Latino collections. [Editor Augenbraum is a longtime LJ reviewer.-Ed.]-Mark L. Grover, Brigham Young Univ., Provo, Utah</p><table><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Introduction: An American Literary Tradition</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Editor's Note</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT"></TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">4</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Account [1542/1555]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">5</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Inca, Garcilaso de la Vega</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">17</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Florida [1605]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">18</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Gaspar Perez de Villagra</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">22</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The History of New Mexico [1610]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">23</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Fray Mathias Saenz de San Antonio</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">33</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lord, If the Shepherd Does Not Hear [1724]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">34</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Unknown Author</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">42</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Comanches [ca. 1780]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">43</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Francisco Palou</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">56</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Historic Account of the Life and Apostolic Work of the Venerable Fray Junipero Serra [1787]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">57</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jose Maria Heredia</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">66</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Niagara [1824]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">67</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Eulalia Perez</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">71</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">An Old Woman Remembers [1877]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">72</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">80</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Squatter and the Don [1885]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">81</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jose Marti</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">98</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Vindication of Cuba [1889]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">99</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Simple Verses [1891]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">105</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pachin Marin</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">108</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">New York from Within [1892]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">108</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">In the Album of an Unknown Woman [1892]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">112</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Improvisation [1892]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">113</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Eusebio Chacon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">114</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Son of the Storm [1892]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">114</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Unknown Author</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">132</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez [ca. 1901]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">133</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Leonor Villegas de Magnon</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">141</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Rebel [ca. 1920]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">142</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">William Carlos Williams</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">155</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">To Elsie [1923]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">156</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">All the Fancy Things [1927]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">158</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Arthur A. Schomburg</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">159</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jose Campeche 1752-1809 [1934]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">160</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bernardo Vega</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">165</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Memoirs of Bernardo Vega [ca. 1944]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">166</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Josephina Niggli</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">173</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mexican Village [1945]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">174</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Mario Suarez</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">201</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cuco Goes to a Party [1947]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">202</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Julia de Burgos</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">208</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Returning [1947]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">209</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Farewell in Welfare Island [1953]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">210</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Cleofas Jaramillo</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">211</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Romance of a Little Village Girl [1955]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">212</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pedro Juan Soto</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">220</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">God in Harlem [1956]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">221</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Jose Antonio Villarreal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">236</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pocho [1959]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">237</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Americo Paredes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">248</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Hammon and the Beans [1963]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">248</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">John Rechy</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">253</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">City of Night [1963]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">254</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">265</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">I Am Joaquin [1967]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">266</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Piri Thomas</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">279</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Down These Mean Streets [1967]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">280</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Victor Hernandez Cruz</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">285</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Today Is a Day of Great Joy [1969]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">286</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">African Things [1973]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">287</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Alurista</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">287</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">el maguey en su desierto [1971]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">288</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">must be the season of the witch [1971]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">289</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">to be fathers once again [1971]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">289</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tomas Rivera</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">290</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him [1971]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">291</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Rudolfo Anaya</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">295</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Bless Me, Ultima [1972]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">296</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Oscar "Zeta" Acosta</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">307</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">The Revolt of the Cockroach People [1973]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">308</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nicholasa Mohr</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">317</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Nilda [1973]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">318</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Pedro Pietri</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">328</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Puerto Rican Obituary [1973]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">329</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Miguel Pinero</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">337</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Short Eyes [1974]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">338</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A Lower East Side Poem [1980]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">349</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Dolores Prida</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">351</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Beautiful Senoritas [1977]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">352</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Luis Valdez</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">364</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Zoot Suit [1978]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">365</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Tato Laviera</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">378</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">My Graduation Speech [1979]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">379</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">AmeRican [1985]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">380</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Sandra Maria Esteves</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">382</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">From the Commonwealth [1979]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">383</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">A la Mujer Borrinquena [1980]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">384</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lourdes Casal</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">385</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">For Ana Veldford [1981]</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" ALIGN="RIGHT">385</TD><TR><TD WIDTH="20%"></TD><TD WIDTH="70%">Lorna Dee Cervantes</TD><TD WIDTH="10%" A</table><article> <h4>From the Publisher</h4>"Anthologies of Latino literature abound, and rightly so, but most focus on contemporary authors. Augenbraum and Olmos dig deeper, tracing the roots of this vibrant literary tradition all the way back to the mid-sixteenth century. They have selected strikingly effective works of history, memoirs, letters, essays, poetry, drama, and fiction, including texts translated into English for the first time, creating a broad range of voices and perspectives. The volume begins with Alva Nunez Cabeza de Vaca's Account, a chronicle of a disastrous 1527 expedition in the Southwest that is emblematic of all encounters between Spanish conquistadores and the indigenous peoples of the Americas. This powerful piece serves as the anthology's overture, and establishes Latino literature's key cultural and political themes. Other compelling and enlightening offerings include works by William Carlos Williams, a poet whose Puerto Rican heritage has rarely been considered integral to his poetic innovations; novelist John Rechy; Cleofas Jaramillo, a descendent of hispano pioneers; and a host of remarkable Latino writers prominent in decades past but overlooked in recent compilations." Booklist, ALA </article> <article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>The compilers, scholars who have studied and written about the Latino population in the United States, have put together an anthology of literary works dealing with the panorama of Latino writings in the United States. The selections range widely, from Cabeza de Vaca's 1542 description of the South to recent excerpts from Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Mexican American authors. The collection is primarily literary though it does include some historical, autobiographical, and essay excerpts. It offers what would be expected in this type of anthology, with an occasional surprise, such as an excerpt from John Rechy's novel City of Night. Readers will be primarily college and university students, but this will also be of value to smaller public libraries with limited Latino collections. [Editor Augenbraum is a longtime LJ reviewer.-Ed.]-Mark L. Grover, Brigham Young Univ., Provo, Utah </article>
91Black NatureCamille T. Dungy0<p><p>Camille T. Dungy is an associate professor in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University. She is the author of two poetry collections, <I>What to Eat, What to Drink, What to Leave for Poison</I> and <I>Suck on the Marrow</I>, and has helped edit two other poetry anthologies.<p></p>Camille T. Dungyblack-naturecamille-t-dungy97808203343180820334316$14.87PaperbackUniversity of Georgia PressDecember 2009Poetry Anthologies, Poetry - General & Miscellaneous, American Poetry, African American Literature - Literary Criticism, American Literature Anthologies, U.S. & Canadian Poetry - General & Miscellaneous - Literary Criticism4326.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)<p><i>Black Nature</i> is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.</p> <p>Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry—anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild.</p> <p>Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements.</p> <p><i>Black Nature</i> brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole.</p> <p>A Friends Fund Publication.</p><p><p><i>Black Nature</i> is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated.<p>Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry&#8212;anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild.<p>Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements.<p><i>Black Nature</i> brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole.<p></p><article> <h4>Library Journal</h4>No pleasures are more aesthetic than poetry and nature, so it is only natural that the two should unite. Editor Dungy here merges the worlds in a satisfying compilation that features over 100 poems by 93 African American poets, including celebrated writers June Jordan and Yusef Komunyakaa as well as newer artists like Remica L. Bingham and Indigo Moor. The collection, which is assembled in cycles that beg "Nature, Be with Us," recognizes "Pest, People Too," and recalls "What the Land Remembers," explores a multitude of themes that incorporate the beauty, transformation, and unpredictability of Earth's elements. Though the collection moves away from political and protest poetry, readers will likely appreciate "Disasters, Natural and Other," as the section draws from familiar incidents. James A. Emanuel's "Emmett Till" paints a haunting yet wondrous fantasy of his spirit, while Douglas Kearney's historical "Floodsong 2: Water Moccasin's Spiritual" has contemporary relevance following Hurricane Katrina. VERDICT Expanding the realm of traditional nature poetry and African American writings, this work will appeal to readers of both genres.—Ashanti White, Univ. of North Carolina at Greensboro </article>
92Anthology of American Literature Volume IIGeorge McMichael0George McMichael, James Leonard, James S. Leonardanthology-of-american-literature-volume-iigeorge-mcmichael97801322164700132216477$92.20PaperbackPrentice HallJanuary 20079th EditionLiterary Collections<p><P>This leading, two-volume anthology represents America&#39;s literary heritage from the colonial times of William Bradford and Anne Bradstreet to the contemporary era of Saul Bellow and Alice Walker. This anthology is best known for its solid headnotes and introductions as well as a balance approach to selections.<p></p><P>Preface<p>About the Editors<p>The Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century<p><i>[NEW] </i><i>Reading the Historical Context</i><p>[NEW] MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)<p>FROM Life on the Mississippi<p>[Sir Walter Scott and the Southern Character]<p>[NEW] ALBION TOURG&Eacute;E (1838-1905)<p>FROM The Invisible Empire<p>[NEW] <i>Reading the Critical Context</i><p>WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837-1920) <p>FROM Criticism and Fiction<p>[The Ideal Grasshopper]<p>[American Fiction]<p>HENRY JAMES (1843-1916) <p>The Art of Fiction<p>[NEW] MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)<p>Fenimore Cooper&rsquo;s Literary Offences<p><i>The Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century</i><p>WALT WHITMAN (1819&mdash;1892) <p>Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass<p>Song of Myself<p>FROM Inscriptions<p>To You<p>One&rsquo;s-Self I Sing<p>When I read the book<p>I Hear America Singing<p>Poets to Come<p>FROM Children of Adam<p>From pent-up aching rivers<p>Out of the rolling ocean the crowd<p>As Adam, Early in the Morning<p>Once I pass&rsquo;d through a populous city<p>Facing west from California&rsquo;s shores<p>FROM Calamus<p>In paths untrodden<p>Scented herbage of my breast<p>What Think You I take My Pen In Hand?<p>I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing<p>I hear it was charged against me<p>Crossing Brooklyn Ferry<p>FROM Sea-Drift<p>Out of the cradle endlessly rocking<p>As I ebb&rsquo;d with the ocean of life<p>FROM By the Roadside<p>When I heard the learn&rsquo;d astronomer<p>The Dalliance of the Eagles<p>FROM Drum-Taps<p>Beat! Beat! Drums!<p>Cavalry Crossing a Ford<p>Bivouac on a Mountain Side<p>Vigil strange I kept on the field one night<p>A march in the ranks hard-prest, and the road unknown<p>A sight in camp in the daybreak gray and dim<p>The Wound-Dresser<p>FROM Memories of President Lincoln<p>When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom&rsquo;d<p>FROM Autumn Rivulets<p>There was a child went forth<p>Sparkles from the Wheel<p>Who Learns My Lesson Complete?<p>Passage to India<p>The Sleepers<p>From Whispers of Heavenly Death<p>A noiseless patient spider<p>FROM Noon to Starry Night<p>To a Locomotive in Winter<p>FROM Democratic Vistas<p>EMILY DICKINSON (1830&mdash;1886) <p>49 I never lost as much but twice<p>67 Success is counted sweetest<p>125 For each ecstatic instant<p>130 These are the days when Birds come back<p>165 A <i>Wounded</i> Deer &ndash; leaps highest<p>185 &ldquo;Faith&rdquo; is a fine invention<p>210 The thought beneath so slight a film<p>214 I taste a liquor never brewed<p>216 Safe in their Alabaster Chambers<p>241 I like a look of Agony<p>249 Wild Nights&ndash;Wild Nights!<p>258 There&rsquo;s a certain Slant of light<p>280 I felt a Funeral, in my Brain<p>287 A Clock stopped<p>303 The Soul selects her own Society<p>324 Some keep the Sabbath going to Church<p>328 A Bird came down the Walk<p>338 I know that He exists<p>341 After great pain, a formal feeling comes<p>401 What Soft&ndash;Cherubic Creatures<p>414 &rsquo;Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch<p>435 Much Madness is divinest Sense<p>441 This is my letter to the World<p>448 This was a Poet&ndash;It is That<p>449 I died for Beauty&ndash;but was scarce<p>465 I heard a Fly buzz&ndash;when I died<p>510 It was not Death, for I stood up<p>520 I started Early&ndash;Took my Dog<p>585 I like to see it lap the Miles<p>613 They shut me up in Prose<p>632 The Brain&ndash;is wider than the sky<p>640 I cannot live with You<p>650 Pain&ndash;has an Element of Blank<p>657 I dwell in Possibility<p>670 One need not be a Chamber&ndash;to be Haunted<p>709 Publication&ndash;is the Auction<p>712 Because I could not stop for Death<p>732 She rose to His Requirement&ndash;dropt<p>745 Renunciation&ndash;is a piercing Virtue<p>754 My life had stood&ndash;a Loaded Gun<p>764 Presentiment&ndash;is that long Shadow&ndash;on the Lawn<p>976 Death is a Dialogue between<p>986 A narrow Fellow in the Grass<p>1052 I never saw a Moor<p>1078 The Bustle in a House<p>1129 Tell all the truth but tell it slant<p>1207 He preached upon &ldquo;Breadth&rdquo; till it argued him narrow<p>1463 A Route of Evanescence<p>1545 The Bible is an antique Volume<p>1624 Apparently with no surprise<p>1670 In Winter in my Room<p>1732 My life closed twice before its close<p>1755 To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee<p>1760 Elysium is as far as to<p>Letters to T. W. Higginson<p>MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)<p>The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County<p>[NEW] Story of the Bad Little Boy<p>[NEW] Disgraceful Persecution of a Boy<p>[NEW] FROM Goldsmith&rsquo;s Friend Abroad Again<p>[NEW] Sociable Jimmy<p>[NEW] A True Story<p>FROM Old Times on the Mississippi<p>[A Boy Wants to Be a Pilot]<p>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn<p>[NEW] My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It<p>[NEW] To the Person Sitting in Darkness<p>[NEW] The War Prayer<p>MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN (1852-1930)<p>A New England Nun<p>[NEW] A Mistaken Charity<p>SARAH ORNE JEWETT (1849-1909)<p>A White Heron<p>[NEW] The Town Poor<p>BRET HARTE (1836-1902)<p>Tennessee&rsquo;s Partner<p>GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE (1844-1925)<p>Belles Demoiselles Plantation<p>CHARLES WADDELL CHESNUTT (1858-1932)<p>The Goophered Grapevine<p>[NEW] The Wife of His Youth<p>[NEW] A Metropolitan Experience<p>JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS (1848-1908)<p>How Mr. Rabbit Was Too Sharp for Mr. Fox 287<p>Free Joe and the Rest of the World<p>WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (1837-1920)<p>Editha<p>HENRY JAMES (1843-1916)<p>Daisy Miller&#58; A Study<p>The Real Thing<p>The Beast in the Jungle<p>AMBROSE BIERCE (1842-1914)<p>An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge<p>[NEW] Chickamauga<p>CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN (1860-1935)<p>The Yellow Wall-Paper<p>[NEW] If I Were a Man<p>[NEW] The Unnatural Mother<p>KATE CHOPIN (1851-1904)<p>The Awakening<p>[NEW] The Storm<p>STEPHEN CRANE (1871-1900) <p>Black riders came from the sea<p>In the desert<p>A god in wrath<p>I saw a man pursuing the horizon<p>Supposing that I should have the courage<p>On the horizon the peaks assembled<p>A man feared that he might find an assassin<p>Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind<p>A man said to the universe<p>A man adrift on a slim spar<p>[NEW] The Blue Hotel<p>The Open Boat<p>FRANK NORRIS (1870-1902)<p>A Deal in Wheat<p>JACK LONDON (1876-1916)<p>The Law of Life<p>[NEW] To Build a Fire<p>[NEW] ANNA JULIA COOPER<p>Has America a Race Problem...?<p>FROM A Voice from the South<p>ABRAHAM CAHAN<p>The Imported Bridegroom<p>EDITH WHARTON (1862-1937)<p>The Other Two<p>[NEW] PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR (1871-1906)<p>The Ingrate<p>We Wear the Mask<p>An Ante-Bellum Sermon<p>When Malindy Sings<p>The Colored Soldiers<p>When Dey &lsquo;Listed Colored Soldiers<p>Sympathy<p>The Race Question Discussed<p>The Fourth of July and Race Outrages<p>THEODORE DREISER (1871-1945)<p>Free<p>[NEW] FROM Sister Carrie<p>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900 To 1945) <p><i>[NEW] </i><i>Reading the Historical Context</i><p>HENRY ADAMS (1838-1918)<p>FROM The Education of Henry Adams<p>The Dynamo and the Virgin<p><i>[NEW] </i><i>Reading the Critical Context</i><p>T. S. ELIOT (1888-1965)<p>Tradition and the Individual Talent<p><i>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900 To 1945) </i><p>[NEW] O. HENRY (WILLIAM SYDNEY PORTER) (1862-1910)<p>A Municipal Report<p>[NEW] OWEN WISTER (1860-1938)<p>FROM The Virginian<p>[NEW] JAMES WELDON JOHNSON (1871-1938)<p>Lift Every Voice and Sing<p>FROM <i>Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man</i><p>W. E. B. DU BOIS (1868-1963)<p>FROM The Souls of Black Folk<p>The Forethought<p>Of the Black Belt<p>Of the Passing of the First Born<p>The After-Thought<p>FROM The Crisis<p>[NEW] A Mild Suggestion<p>[NEW] On Being Crazy<p>[NEW] A Litany in Atlanta<p>[NEW] The Comet<p>EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON (1869-1935) <p>Luke Havergal<p>Zola<p>Richard Cory<p>Cliff Klingenhagen<p>Miniver Cheevy<p>How Annandale Went Out<p>Eros Turannos<p>Mr. Flood&rsquo;s Party<p>ROBERT FROST (1874-1963)<p>Mending Wall<p>Home Burial<p>After Apple-Picking<p>The Road Not Taken<p>An Old Man&rsquo;s Winter Night<p>Birches<p>The Oven Bird<p>For Once, Then, Something<p>Fire and Ice<p>Design<p>Nothing Gold Can Stay<p>Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening<p>Acquainted with the Night<p>West-Running Brook<p>Desert Places<p>Neither out Far Nor in Deep<p>Directive<p>In Winter in the Woods Alone<p>[NEW] GERTRUDE SIMMONS BONNIN (ZITKALA SA) (1876-1938)<p>The School Days of an Indian Girl<p>[NEW] CARL SANDBURG (1878-1967)<p>Chicago<p>Lost<p>Graceland<p>Fog<p>Psalm of Those Who Go Forth Before Daylight<p>Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind<p>WILLA CATHER (1873-1947) <p>A Wagner Matin&eacute;e<p>[NEW] Paul&rsquo;s Case<p>ELLEN GLASGOW (1873-1945) <p>The Difference<p>GERTRUDE STEIN (1874-1946) <p>FROM Three Lives<p>The Gentle Lena<p>Susie Asado<p>Picasso<p>A Movie<p>[NEW] SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876-1941) <p>FROM Winesburg, Ohio<p>The Book of the Grotesque<p>Hands<p>Mother<p>Tandy<p>JOHN DOS PASSOS (1896-1970) <p>FROM U.S.A.<p>Preface<p>FROM The 42<sup>nd</sup> Parallel<p>Proteus<p>FROM 1919<p>Newsreel XLIII<p>The Body of an American<p>FROM The Big Money<p>Newsreel LXVI<p>The Camera Eye (50)<p>Vag<p>EUGENE O&rsquo;NEILL (1888-1953)<p>The Hairy Ape<p>SUSAN GLASPELL (1876-1948)<p>Trifles<p>[NEW] SINCLAIR LEWIS (1885-1951)<p>FROM Babbitt<p>EZRA POUND (1885-1972)<p>Portrait d&#39;une Femme<p>Salutation<p>A Pact<p>In a Station of the Metro<p>The River-Merchants Wife&#58; A Letter<p>FROM Hugh Selwyn Mauberley<p>I [E.P. Ode pour l&rsquo;Election de son Sepulchre]<p>II [The age demanded an image]<p>III [The tea-rose tea-gown, etc.]<p>IV [These fought in any case]<p>V [There died a myriad]<p>FROM The Cantos<p>I [And then went down to the ship]<p>II [Hang it all, Robert Browning]<p>XLV [With <i>Usura</i>]<p>LXXXI [What thou lovest well remains]<p>A Retrospect<p>T. S. ELIOT (1888-1965)<p>The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock<p>Preludes<p>Gerontion<p>The Waste Land<p>Notes on The Waste Land<p>Journey of the Magi<p>E. E. CUMMINGS (1894-1962)<p>[in Just-]<p>[O sweet spontaneous]<p>[Buffalo Bills defunct]<p>[the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls]<p>[&ldquo;next to of course god america I&rdquo;]<p>[my sweet old etcetera]<p>[somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond]<p>[r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r]<p>[anyone lived in a pretty how town]<p>[pity this busy monster,manunkind]<p>[when serpents bargain for the right to squirm]<p>[1(a]<p>HART CRANE (1899-1932)<p>Chaplinesque<p>At Melville&rsquo;s Tomb<p>Voyages<p>FROM The Bridge<p>To Brooklyn Bridge<p>Powhatan&rsquo;s Daughter<p>The Harbor Dawn<p>Van Winkle<p>The River<p>The Tunnel<p>Atlantis<p>[NEW] EDGAR LEE MASTERS (1868-1950)<p>FROM Spoon River Anthology<p>Knowlt Hoheimer<p>Nellie Clark<p>Petit, the Poet<p>Anne Rutledge<p>Lucinda Matlock<p>[NEW] ANZIA YEZIERSKA (1880-1970)<p>The Fat of the Land<p>[NEW] EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY (1892-1950)<p>Spring<p>First Fig<p>[I shall forget you presently, my dear]<p>[Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare]<p>WALLACE STEVENS (1879-1955)<p>Peter Quince at the Clavier<p>Disillusionment of Ten O&rsquo;Clock<p>Sunday Morning<p>Domination of Black<p>The Death of a Soldier<p>Anecdote of the Jar<p>A High-Toned Old Christian Woman<p>The Emperor of Ice-Cream<p>The Idea of Order at Key West<p>Of Modern Poetry<p>Final Soliloquy of the Interior Paramour<p>The Plain Sense of Things<p>Of Mere Being<p>WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS (1883-1963)<p>Con Brio<p>The Young Housewife<p>Pastoral<p>Tract<p>Danse Russe<p>Queen-Anne&rsquo;s-Lace<p>Spring and All<p>To Elsie<p>The Red Wheelbarrow<p>At the Ball Game<p>Between Walls<p>This Is Just to Say<p>The Yachts<p>These<p>Seafarer<p>Landscape with the Fall of Icarus<p>ROBINSON JEFFERS (1887-1962)<p>Boats in a Fog<p>Hurt Hawks<p>Shine, Perishing Republic<p>MARIANNE MOORE (1887-1972)<p>To a Steam Roller<p>The Fish<p>Poetry<p>No Swan So Fine<p>The Mind Is an Enchanting Thing<p>In Distrust of Merits<p>[NEW] <i>THE NEW NEGRO</i> (1925)<p>Foreword, by Alain Locke<p>Vestiges, by Rudolph Fisher<p>Fog, by John Matheus<p>Fern, by Jean Toomer<p>Spunk, by Zora Neale Hurston<p>Harlem Wine, by Countee Cullen<p>White Houses, by Claude McKay<p>I Too, by Langston Hughes<p>The Black Finger, by Angelina Grimke<p>The Road, by Helene Johnson<p>COUNTE CULLEN (1903-1946)<p>Yet Do I Marvel<p>For a Lady I Know<p>Incident<p>From the Dark Tower<p>A Brown Girl Dead<p>Heritage<p>Scottsboro, Too, Is Worth Its Song<p>JEAN TOOMER (1894-1967)<p>FROM Cane<p>Blood-Burning Moon<p>Cotton Song<p>Carma<p>Song of the Son<p>ZORA NEALE HURSTON (1891-1960) <p>[NEW] How It Feels to be Colored Me<p>The Gilded Six-Bits<p>THOMAS WOLFE (1900-1938)<p>Only the Dead Know Brooklyn<p>The Far and the Near<p>F. SCOTT FITZGERALD (1896-1940)<p>[NEW] Bernice Bobs Her Hair<p>Winter Dreams<p>ERNEST HEMINGWAY (1899-1961)<p>Big Two-Hearted River<p>WILLIAM FAULKNER (1897-1962)<p>That Evening Sun<p>[NEW] Intruder in the Dust<p>LANGSTON HUGHES (1902-1967)<p>The Negro Speaks of Rivers<p>The Weary Blues<p>Young Gal&rsquo;s Blues<p>Note on Commercial Theatre<p>Dream Boogie<p>Harlem<p>Theme for English B<p>On the Road<p>JOHN STEINBECK (1902-1968)<p>[NEW] FROM The Long Valley<p>The Snake<p>The Vigilante<p>KATHERINE ANNE PORTER (1890-1980)<p>Flowering Judas<p>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945 to Present)<p>[NEW] <i>Reading the Historical Context</i><p>[NEW] MARTIN LUTHER KING (1929-1968)<p>I Have a Dream<p>[NEW] TIM O&rsquo;BRIEN (1946&mdash;)<p>FROM The Things They Carried<p>On the Rainy River<p>[NEW] DIN&Eacute; BAHANE&rsquo;&#58; THE NAVAJO CREATION STORY<p>[The Quarrel Between First Man and First Woman]<p><i>Reading the Critical Context</i><p><p><p><i>The Literature of the Twentieth Century (1945 to Present)</i><p>EUDORA WELTY (1909-2001)<p>[NEW] Powerhouse<p>RICHARD WRIGHT (1908-1960)<p>[NEW] FROM <i>Native Son</i><p><br>RALPH ELLISON (1914-1994) <p>FROM Invisible Man<p>TENNESSEE WILLIAMS (1911-1983) <p>The Glass Menagerie<p>THEODORE ROETHKE (1908-1963)<p>Dolor<p>Open House<p>Cuttings<p>Cuttings (Later)<p>Root Cellar<p>My Papas Waltz<p>In a Dark Time<p><p>RANDALL JARRELL (1914-1965)<p>Losses<p>The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner<p>A Girl in the Library<p>In Montecito<p>ELIZABETH BISHOP (1911-1979)<p>A Miracle for Breakfast<p>The Fish<p>Over 2,000 Illustrations and a Complete Concordance<p>Visits to St. Elizabeths<p>Sestina<p>The Armadillo<p>Brazil, January 1, 1502<p>In the Waiting Room<p>One Art<p>ROBERT LOWELL (1917-1977)<p>The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket<p>Mr. Edwards and the Spider<p>Memories of West Street and Lepke<p>Skunk Hour<p>For the Union Dead<p>Waking Early Sunday Morning<p>Will Not Come Back<p>[NEW] ANN PETRY (1908-1997)<p>Solo on the Drums<p>RICHARD WILBUR (1921&mdash;)<p>Marginalia<p>Lamarck Elaborated<p>A Hole in the Floor<p>Trolling for Blues<p>[NEW] SHIRLEY JACKSON (1916-1965)<p>The Lottery<p>[NEW] JOSEPH HELLER (1923-1999)<p>FROM Catch-22<p>Major Major Major Major<p>NORMAN MAILER (1923&mdash;)<p>FROM <i>The</i> <i>Armies of the Night</i><p>ALLEN GINSBERG (1926-1997)<p>Howl<p>[NEW]Footnote to Howl<p>A Supermarket in California<p>America<p>To Aunt Rose<p>GARY SNYDER (1930&mdash;)<p>Riprap<p>[Translation of a Poem by Han-Shan]<p>Poem Left in Sourdough Mountain Lookout<p>I Went into the Maverick Bar<p>Soy Sauce<p>ADRIENNE RICH (1929&mdash;)<p>At a Bach Concert<p>Living in Sin<p>Breakfast in a Bowling Alley in Utica, New York<p>Divisions of Labor<p>For This<p>1999<p>DENISE LEVERTOV (1923-1997)<p>Beyond the End<p>Pure Products<p>Come into Animal Presence<p>The Ache of Marriage<p>O Taste and See<p>Abel&rsquo;s Bride<p>Mad Song<p>A Hunger<p>Zeroing in<p>ANNE SEXTON (1928-1974)<p>The Farmer&rsquo;s Wife<p>Ringing the Bells<p>And One for My Dame<p>The Addict<p>Us<p>Rowing<p>SYLVIA PLATH (1932-1963)<p>The Bee Meeting<p>Lady Lazarus<p>Ariel<p>Daddy<p>Fever 103&Uacute;<p>JAMES DICKEY (1923-1997)<p>The Lifeguard<p>Reincarnation (I)<p>In the Mountain Tent<p>The Shark&rsquo;s Parlor<p>W. S. MERWIN (1927&mdash;)<p>Grandfather in the Old Men&rsquo;s Home<p>The Drunk in the Furnace<p>Noah&rsquo;s Raven<p>The Dry Stone Mason<p>Fly<p>Strawberries<p>Direction<p>A. R. AMMONS (1926-2001)<p>Sight Seed<p>Motion Which Disestablishes Organizes Everything<p>The Damned<p>JAMES BALDWIN (1924-1987)<p>Sonny&rsquo;s Blues<p>FLANNERY OCONNOR (1925-1964)<p>A Good Man Is Hard to Find<p>JOHN UPDIKE (1932&mdash;)<p>[NEW] A & P<p>PHILIP ROTH (1933&mdash;)<p>The Conversion of the Jews<p>BERNARD MALAMUD (1914-1986)<p>The Magic Barrel<p>TILLIE OLSEN (1913&mdash;)<p>I Stand Here Ironing<p>TOM&Aacute;S RIVERA (1935-1984)<p>. . . And the Earth Did Not Part<p>AMIRI BARAKA (LEROI JONES) (1934-)<p>In Memory of Radio<p>The Bridge<p>Notes for a Speech<p>An Agony, As Now<p>A Poem for Democrats<p>A Poem for Speculative Hipsters<p>A Poem Some People Will Have to Understand<p>A Poem for Half-White College Students<p>Biography<p>SONIA SANCHEZ (1934&mdash;)<p>the final solution/<p>to blk/record/buyers<p>Womanhood<p>Masks<p>Just Don&rsquo;t Never Give Up on Love<p>[NEW] BLACK FIRE (1968)<p>Poem, by James T. Stewart<p>Neon Diaspora, by David Henderson<p>when my uncle willie saw, by Carol Freeman<p>For the Truth, Because It&#39;s Necessary, by Edward Spriggs<p>&ldquo;Oh shit a riot!&rdquo; by Jacques Wakefield<p>RITA DOVE (1952-)<p>Kentucky, 1833<p>Adolescence &mdash; I<p>Adolescence &mdash; II<p>Adolescence &mdash; III<p>Banneker<p>Jiving<p>The Zeppelin Factory<p>Under the Viaduct, 1932<p>Roast Possum<p>Weathering Out<p>Daystar<p>MAXINE HONG KINGSTON (1940&mdash;)<p>No Name Woman<p>EDWARD ALBEE (1928&mdash;)<p>The Zoo Story<p>SAUL BELLOW (1915&mdash;)<p>A Silver Dish<p>KURT VONNEGUT (1922&mdash;)<p>Welcome to the Monkey House<p>WILLIAM STYRON (1925&mdash;)<p>FROM The Confessions of Nat Turner<p>N. SCOTT MOMADAY (1934&mdash;)<p>FROM The Way to Rainy Mountain<p>The Arrowmaker<p>THOMAS PYNCHON (1937&mdash;) <p>Entropy<p>JAMES WELCH (1940-2003)<p>FROM The Death of Jim Loney<p>JOYCE CAROL OATES (1938&mdash;)<p>How I Contemplated the World from the Detroit House of<p>Correction and Began My Life over Again<p>JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON (1943&#151;-)<p>The Faithful<p>ALICE WALKER (1944&mdash;)<p>Everyday Use<p>[NEW]Burial<p>AMY TAN (1952&mdash;)<p>FROM The Joy Luck Club<p>Half and Half<p>BOBBIE ANN MASON (1940&mdash;)<p>Shiloh<p>[NEW] DAVID BRADLEY (1950&mdash;)<p>FROM The Chaneysville Incident<p>197903042100 (Sunday)<p>GLORIA NAYLOR (1950&mdash;)<p>FROM The Women of Brewster Place<p>Lucielia Louise Turner<p>LESLIE MARMON SILKO (1948&mdash;)<p>The Man to Send Rain Clouds<p>Coyote Holds a Full House in His Hand<p>RAYMOND CARVER (1938-1988) <p>Cathedral<p>DON DELILLO (1936&mdash;)<p>FROM White Noise<p>[NEW] GLORIA ANZALD&Uacute;A (1942-2004)<p>FROM Borderlands/La Frontera&#58; The New Mestiza<p>The Homeland, Aztl&aacute;n / El otro M&eacute;xico<p>JAMAICA KINCAID (1949&mdash;)<p>Girl<p>Wingless<p>LOUISE ERDRICH (1954&mdash;)<p>FROM Love Medicine<p>The Red Convertible<p>TINA HOWE (1937&#151;-)<p>Painting Churches<p>FREDERICK BUSCH (1941-2006)<p>Bring Your Friends to the Zoo<p>BILLY COLLINS (1941&mdash;)<p>Winter Syntax<p>Books<p>Introduction to Poetry<p>SIMON ORTIZ (1941&mdash;)<p>A Designated National Park<p>Canyon de Chelly<p>Final Solution&#58; Jobs, Leaving<p>SHERMAN ALEXIE (1966&mdash;)<p>What you Pawn I Will Redeem<p>Defending Walt Whitman<p>Reference Works, Bibliographies<p>Criticism, Literary and Cultural History<p>Acknowledgements<p>Index to Authors, Titles, and First Lines
93Best Remembered PoemsMartin Gardner0Martin Gardner (Editor), Martin Gardnerbest-remembered-poemsmartin-gardner9780486271651048627165X$5.94PaperbackDover PublicationsDecember 1992Poetry Anthologies, American Poetry, English Poetry, English & Irish Literature Anthologies, American Literature Anthologies2245.40 (w) x 8.45 (h) x 0.45 (d)The 126 poems in this superb collection of 19th- and 20th-century British and American verse range from the impassioned "Renascence" of Edna St. Vincent Millay to Edward Lear's whimsical "The Owl and the Pussycat."&nbsp; Famous poets such as Wordsworth, Tennyson, Whitman, and Frost are well-represented, as are less well-